What are the Most Important Items in an Estate Plan During the Pandemic?

Estate Plan Covid-19
Estate planning is the process of arranging, while you are alive, what will happen to your estate, your children and your wealth after you die.

What are the Most Important Items in an Estate Plan During the Pandemic?

KCRA’s article entitled“5 things to know about estate planning” says that estate planning is a topic that people frequently don’t like to think about. However, more people now want to create a will or revise one that’s already in existence, because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

You should have a will. You can find forms online, or you can (in some states) use a holographic will, which is handwritten. However, a holographic will can be incomplete and unclear. DIY estate planning isn’t a good idea if you have any property, minor children, or want to save on taxes for your family. Use an experienced estate planning attorney to ensure that you are covering all of your bases.

Without a will, your “state” makes one for you. If you die intestate, state law will dictate how your probate estate will be distributed at your death. However, this makes it take longer to administer your estate, which extends the grieving process for family members.  It is also more expensive, more time-consuming and more work for those you leave behind. Lastly, you have no say in how you want your property distributed.

Why do I need a will? Everyone should think about estate planning and have an estate plan in place. This should include what would happen, if you’re incapacitated. With the coronavirus pandemic, this might mean contracting the disease and being in a hospital on a ventilator for weeks and unable to care for your children.

How long does a will take? Drafting your will is a very personal and customized process that usually happens over several meetings with a qualified estate planning attorney. It could be weeks or months, but the average length of time it takes to create a will is 30 to 60 days. However, in the midst of the pandemic, estate planning attorneys are able to get these completed much more quickly, when necessary.

What about COVID-19? When your will is complete, there’s usually a signing meeting set with the attorney, witnesses, a notary and the person creating the will. However, now there’s no way to safely gather to sign these critical documents. Many states have made exceptions to the witness rule or are allowing processes using technology, known as remote notarization.

Reference: KCRA (April 16, 2020). “5 things to know about estate planning”

Read more related articles at:

The Covid-19 Essential Estate Planning “Go Package”

A Guide To Estate Planning During The Coronavirus Pandemic

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

Requests for Estate Plans Reflect Fears about Coronavirus

Click here to check out our Master Class!

 

Please Share:
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Subscribe!

WATCH OUR MASTERCLASS