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funding a trust

Why Is Trust Funding Important in Estate Planning?

Why Is Trust Funding Important in Estate Planning?

Trust funding is a crucial part of estate planning that many people forget to do. If done properly with the help of an experienced estate planning attorney, trust funding will avoid probate, provide for you in the event of your incapacity and save on estate taxes, says Forbes’ recent article entitled “Don’t Overlook Your Trust Funding.”

If you have a revocable trust, you have control over the trust and can modify it during your lifetime. You can also fund the trust while you’re alive. This will save your family time and aggravation after your death.

You can also protect yourself and your family, if you become incapacitated. Your revocable trust likely provides for you and your family during your lifetime. You are able to manage your assets yourself, while you are alive and in good health. However, who will manage the assets in your place, if your health declines or if you are incapacitated?

If you go ahead and fund the trust now, your successor trustee will be able to manage the assets for you and your family if you’re not able. However, if a successor trustee doesn’t have access to the assets to manage on your behalf, a conservator may need to be appointed by the court to oversee your assets, which can be expensive and time consuming.

If you’re married, you may have created a trust that has terms for estate tax savings. These provisions will often defer estate taxes until the death of the second spouse, by providing income to the surviving spouse and access to principal during her lifetime. The ultimate beneficiaries are your children.

You’ll need to fund your trust to make certain that these estate tax provisions work properly.

Any asset transfer will need to be consistent with your estate plan. Ask an experienced estate planning attorney about transferring taxable brokerage accounts, bank accounts and real estate to the trust.

You may also want to think about transferring tangible items to the trust and a closely held business interests, like stock in a family business or an interest in a limited liability company (LLC).

Reference: Forbes (July 13, 2020) “Don’t Overlook Your Trust Funding”

Read more related articles at:

Understanding Funding Your Living Trust

What Is Funding a Trust?

Also read one of our previous Blogs at :

10 Reasons Why You Need A Trust

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children

How Do I Include Care for My Children in Estate Planning?

 

How Do I Include Care for My Children in Estate Planning?

To make certain that parents’ wishes are followed, they should create a will that designates a guardian and a conservator in case both parents die, counsels The Choteau (MT) Acantha article entitled “Plan for children’s future when making out a will.”

A guardianship provides for the care of the children, until they reach adulthood (usually age 18) and gives the guardian the authority and responsibility of a parent. A guardian makes decisions about a child’s well-being, education and health. A conservatorship is designed to manage and distribute funds and assets left to children, until they’re age 18. A single individual can be appointed to do both roles, or separate people can be designated as guardian and conservator.

Frequently, the toughest decisions parents have is agreeing who they want to have the responsibility of raising their children and managing their money. Usually they select a person with similar values, lifestyle and child rearing beliefs.

It can be important to talk about the issue with older children, because some states (like Montana) permit children ages 14 and older to ask a court to appoint a guardian, other than the person named in parents’ wills.

You should also name a backup guardian and conservator, in case their first choices aren’t up to the task and review your choices periodically.

In many states, the law stipulates that when children attain the age of 18, they are able to get the property that was in the care of a conservator, no matter what their capability to manage it. Another option is to leave the assets in a trust, rather than a conservatorship.

Parents can provide in their wills the property that they want to pass directly to the trust, which is also called a testamentary trust. These assets can include life insurance payments, funds from checking accounts, stocks, bonds, or other funds. Parents can create a trust agreement with an experienced estate planning attorney that provides their named trustee with the power to manage the trust assets and use the income for their children’s benefit.

The trust agreement goes into effect at the death of both parents. It says the way in which the parents want the money to be spent, who the trustee should be and when the trust ends. The trustee must follow the parents’ instructions for the children.

Reference: Choteau (MT) Acantha (May 13, 2020) “Plan for children’s future when making out a will”

Read more related articles at:

Estate Planning for Young Families: 5 Questions Parents Need to Answer

Your Children

Also, Read one of our previous Blogs at :

Should I Use a Trust to Protect My Children’s Inheritance?

Click here to check out our Master Class!

Update Will

Update Will at These 12 Times in Your Life

Update Will at These 12 Times in Your Life

Estate planning lawyers hear it all the time—people meaning to update their will, but somehow never getting around to actually getting it done. The only group larger than the ones who mean to “someday,” are the ones who don’t think they ever need to update their documents, says the article “12 Different Times When You Should Update Your Will” from Kiplinger. The problems become abundantly clear when people die, and survivors learn that their will is so out-of-date that it creates a world of problems for a grieving family.

There are some wills that do stand the test of time, but they are far and few between. Families undergo all kinds of changes, and those changes should be reflected in the will. Here are one dozen times in life when wills need to be reviewed:

Welcoming a child to the family. The focus is on naming a guardian and a trustee to oversee their finances. The will should be flexible to accommodate additional children in the future.

Divorce is a possibility. Don’t wait until the divorce is underway to make changes. Do it beforehand. If you die before the divorce is finalized, your spouse will have marital rights to your property. Once you file for divorce, in many states you are not permitted to change your will, until the divorce is finalized. Make no moves here, however, without the advice of your attorney.

Your divorce has been finalized. If you didn’t do it before, update your will now. Don’t neglect updating beneficiaries on life insurance and any other accounts that may have named your ex as a beneficiary.

When your child(ren) marry. You may be able to mitigate the lack of a prenuptial agreement, by creating trusts in your will, so anything you leave your child won’t be considered a marital asset, if his or her marriage goes south.

Your beneficiary has problems with drugs or money. Money left directly to a beneficiary is at risk of being attached by creditors or dissolving into a drug habit. Updating your will to includes trusts that allow a trustee to only distribute funds under optimal circumstances protects your beneficiary and their inheritance.

Named executor or beneficiary dies. Your old will may have a contingency plan for what should happen if a beneficiary or executor dies, but you should probably revisit the plan. If a named executor dies and you don’t update the will, then what happens if the second executor dies?

A young family member grows up. Most people name a parent as their executor, then a spouse or trusted sibling. Two or three decades go by. An adult child may now be ready to take on the task of handling your estate.

New laws go into effect. In recent months, there have been many big changes to the law that impact estate planning, from the SECURE Act to the CARES act. Ask your estate planning attorney every few years, if there have been new laws that are relevant to your estate plan.

An inheritance or a windfall. If you come into a significant amount of money, your tax liability changes. You’ll want to update your will, so you can do efficient tax planning as part of your estate plan.

Can’t find your will? If you can’t find the original will, then you need a new will. Your estate planning attorney will make sure that your new will has language that states revokes all prior wills.

Buying property in another country or moving to another country. Some countries have reciprocity with America. However, transferring property to an heir in one country may be delayed, if the will needs to be probated in another country. Ask your estate planning attorney, if you need wills for each country in which you own property.

Family and friends are enemies. Friends have no rights when it comes to your estate plan. Therefore, if families and friends are fighting, the family member will win. If you suspect that your family may push back to any bequests to friends, consider adding a “No Contest” clause to disinherit family members who try to elbow your friends out of the estate.

Reference: Kiplinger (May 26, 2020) “12 Different Times When You Should Update Your Will”

Read more related articles at:

When Should You Redo Your Will?

6 Times You Need to Update Your Will

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at :

Wills v. Trusts: What’s Right for You?

Click here to check out our Master Class!

 

covid estate planning

How Can Estate Planning Protect Me from COVID-19?

There are several things you need to consider, when it comes to estate planning,

There are several things you need to consider, when it comes to estate planning, explains WFMY.com in the recent article “A different kind of coronavirus protection: Wills & Power of Attorney documents.”

A financial power of attorney is first on the list of things to consider. This essential legal document gives a trusted agent the authority to make financial decisions on your behalf, if you become incapacitated. A financial power of attorney can go into effect whenever you want. However, most people have their estate planning attorney draft the POA to go into effect, once the principal or the person who’s giving the authority can no longer make decisions for themselves.

In addition, if you become ill and fall into a coma, you need someone to be able to also make medical decisions. A health care power of attorney permits your agent to make medical decisions on your behalf. You can also sign a living will, which can state your wishes about healthcare decisions, especially end of life decisions.

A will can state your decisions for the distribution of your assets when you die. However, your property will stay in your name until that occurs. Another option is a living trust, which places your property in a trust for the benefit of a charity, your loved ones, or both. A trust may distribute the property more efficiently.

While the terms in your will and trust are important, you should also have a discussion with your family and let them know what you’re thinking. This will help avoid hard feelings after you’re gone.

It’s important to speak with an experienced estate planning attorney and talk to the people you want to be your POA attorney-in-fact, executor of your will and your trustee. Talk to your attorney about what happens when one of these key persons included in your planning dies.

You should also think about your parents and if they have an estate plan. You should know what will happen, if they become ill and need care. What happens if they get Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia?

You should make certain that you and those you love, have legal estate planning documents in place prepared by an experienced estate planning attorney.

From there, review your plan every few years with your attorney, because things change.

Reference: WFMY.com (April 22, 2020) “A different kind of coronavirus protection: Wills & Power of Attorney document

Read more related Articles at :

Impact of COVID-19 on Estate Planning

Estate Planning and COVID-19: Four Must-Have Documents for Protection During a Crisis

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at :

Requests for Estate Plans Reflect Fears about Coronavirus

 

 

Family Estate Planning

Am I Making One of the Five Common Estate Planning Mistakes?

You don’t have to be super-wealthy to see the benefits from a well-prepared estate plan. However, you must make sure the plan is updated regularly, so these kinds of mistakes don’t occur and hurt the people you love most, reports Kiplinger in its article entitled “Is Anything Wrong with Your Estate Plan? Here are 5 Common Mistakes.”

An estate plan contains legal documents that will provide clarity about how you’d like your wishes executed, both during your life and after you die. There are three key documents:

  • A will
  • A durable power of attorney for financial matters
  • A health care power of attorney or similar document

In the last two of these documents, you appoint someone you trust to help make decisions involving your finances or health, in case you can’t while you’re still living. Let’s look at five common mistakes in estate planning:

# 1: No Estate Plan Whatsoever. A will has specific information about who will receive your money, property and other property. It’s important for people, even with minimal assets. If you don’t have a will, state law will determine who will receive your assets. Dying without a will (or “intestate”) entails your family going through a time-consuming and expensive process that can be avoided by simply having a will.

A will can also include several other important pieces of information that can have a significant impact on your heirs, such as naming a guardian for your minor children and an executor to carry out the business of closing your estate and distributing your assets. Without a will, these decisions will be made by a probate court.

# 2: Forgetting to Name or Naming the Wrong Beneficiaries. Some of your assets, like retirement accounts and life insurance policies, aren’t normally controlled by your will. They pass directly without probate to the beneficiaries you designate. To ensure that the intended person inherits these assets, a specific person or trust must be designated as the beneficiary for each account.

# 3: Wrong Joint Title. Married couples can own assets jointly, but they may not know that there are different types of joint ownership, such as the following:

  • Joint Tenants with Rights of Survivorship (JTWROS) means that, if one joint owner passes away, then the surviving joint owners (their spouse or partner) automatically inherits the deceased owner’s part of the asset. This transfer of ownership bypasses a will entirely.
  • Tenancy in Common (TIC) means that each joint owner has a separately transferrable share of the asset. Each owner’s will says who gets the share at their death.

# 4: Not Funding a Revocable Living Trust. A living trust lets you put assets in a trust with the ability to freely move assets in and out of it, while you’re alive. At death, assets continue to be held in trust or are distributed to beneficiaries, which is set by the terms of the trust. The most common error made with a revocable living trust is failure to retitle or transfer ownership of assets to the trust. This critical task is often overlooked after the effort of drafting the trust document is done. A trust is of no use if it doesn’t own any assets.

# 5: The Right Time to Name a Trust as a Beneficiary of an IRA. The new SECURE Act, which went into effect on January 1, 2020 gets rid of what’s known as the stretch IRA. This allowed non-spouses who inherited retirement accounts to stretch out disbursements over their lifetimes. It let assets in retirement accounts continue their tax-deferred growth over many years. However, the new Act requires a full payout from the inherited IRA within 10 years of the death of the original account holder, in most cases, when a non-spouse individual is the beneficiary.

Therefore, it may not be a good idea to name a trust as the beneficiary of a retirement account. It’s possible that either distributions from the IRA may not be allowed when a beneficiary would like to take one, or distributions will be forced to take place at a bad time and the beneficiary will be hit with unnecessary taxes. Talk to an experienced estate planning attorney and review your estate plans to make certain that the new SECURE Act provisions don’t create unintended consequences.

Reference: Kiplinger (Feb. 20, 2020) “Is Anything Wrong with Your Estate Plan? Here are 5 Common Mistakes”

Read more related articles at:

5 Biggest Estate Planning Mistakes You Can Make

Is Anything Wrong with Your Estate Plan? Here are 5 Common Mistakes

Also read one of our Previous Blogs at:

Common Estate Planning Mistakes to Avoid

 

 

money and art

Does Artwork Belong in a Charitable Remainder Trust?

Does Artwork Belong in a Charitable Remainder Trust?

A charitable remainder trust is a tax-exempt irrevocable trust that is created to decrease taxable income of people, by initially giving income to the beneficiaries of the trust for a set period of time and then donating the rest of the trust funds to a designated charity.

Financial Advisor’s recent article entitled “Putting Art Into Charitable Remainder Trusts” says that people who have valuable artwork or other collectibles that are hard to divide or that their kids don’t want, can investigate a charitable remainder trust with an estate planning attorney as an option.

A Charitable Remainder Trust is designed to save asset owners taxes that they would have to pay, if they sold their artworks on the open market. CRTs are also designed so that when they expire, they allow philanthropically inclined individuals help their favorite charitable organizations.

Many people with higher net worth hold about a tenth of their wealth in art and collectibles.  Due to the nature of the assets, the value may be hard to split up among their heirs, or no one heir may want that specific piece of art. A charitable remainder trust gives the art or collectible owner a solution to that issue. The trust will reduce her taxable income, by first dispersing income to the trust beneficiaries for a certain period of time and then the remainder is donated to a charity.

It’s important to note that art markets are quirky, and a CRT protects an owner from forcing her into a fire sale, when she or a trustee is trying to divide the estate.

For example, say the parents purchased a number of pieces of artwork on a European vacation and shipped them back to the United States. They have three children, but there’s one piece of art that’s more valuable than the others. As a result, there was no way to equitably divide the pieces. If they sold the pieces outright, there would be a 28% tax imposed.

However, the parents could instead place the artwork in a charitable remainder trust, get a tax deduction for part of the value, get income from the trust and then give a sum to a selected charity.

The asset can be held in the trust until one owner dies, until both parents pass, or for up to a certain number of years, based on how the trust is set up. Contact an estate planning attorney experienced in charitable planning strategies.

Reference: Financial Advisor (Feb. 21, 2020) “Putting Art Into Charitable Remainder Trusts”

Read more related articles at:

New IRS Rule Opens Tax Saving Strategy To Art Collectors

Charitable Remainder Trusts

Also Read one of our previous Blogs at :

Charitable Giving and Your Estate Plan

 

Home in Trust

How Do I Revoke a Trust on My Home?

 

How Do I Revoke a Trust on My Home?

There are a number of issues to consider, says nj.com’s recent article entitled “I want to revoke a trust on my house. What do I do?” To revoke a trust on a house, will require the assistance of an experienced estate planning attorney.

The answer to a question about how to get out of a trust on a home is going to be in the terms of the trust itself. However, if the terms of the trust are silent, the answer may be found in the trust laws in the state statutes.

However, if answering the question in general terms, the primary concern is whether the trust is revocable or irrevocable. If the trust is irrevocable, it means that the house can’t be removed from the trust. The exception to this rule is with a court order. Obtaining court approval can be very expensive and time consuming. In addition, there’s no guarantee you’ll get that approval, because courts frequently deny the requests depending on the facts of the case.

The first step is to determine whether the trust is revocable. You will then need to see who you are in relation to the trust.

Without a court order, the only person (or entity) who the trustee can sign a deed transferring a house that’s owned by a trust is the trustee.

The trust is set up to be managed by the trustee, rather than by any of the beneficiaries of the trust. Thus, for any change in the status of the house to occur, the trustee has to be in agreement that this should be done.

Next, let’s look at the reason why the home was initially put in a trust.

If the purpose was to lower estate taxes, it may make sense to remove the house from trust. This is especially the case, if the state no longer has an estate tax, like New Jersey which just got rid of theirs a few years ago, or there was never any state estate tax. An estate rarely meets the threshold for federal estate taxes.

However, if the house was put in the trust for purposes of asset protection as part of a long-term care plan, there aren’t many good reasons to take the house out of trust. The trust can sell the house and hold onto the proceeds or purchase another house without jeopardizing the asset protection plan.

Reference: nj.com (Feb. 4, 2020) “I want to revoke a trust on my house. What do I do?”

For more related articles go to:

How to Dissolve a Revocable Trust

How exactly does one go about revoking a revocable trust?

And read one of our previous Blogs at: 

What Do I Need to Know About Revocable Living Trusts?

 

Jeffrey Eptsein

What Will Happen to Jeffrey Epstein’s Estate?

What Will Happen to Jeffrey Epstein’s Estate? Jeffrey Epstein’s will was filed in the U.S. Virgin Islands. It’s a “pour-over will” that transfers all of his assets into a trust. The trust is secret, not open to the public, and is administered by trustees. Epstein’s will, which is a public document, claimed assets of more than $577 million.

However, none of that money can be moved into Epstein’s trust until a probate court decides what to do with the numerous claims made against the convicted sex offender and his estate.

CBS News’ recent article, “What we know about Jeffrey Epstein’s will, and what happens next with his estate,” provides a list of questions that can help explain what happens next with Epstein’s estate. His estate will be overseen by the two executors named in the will, attorneys Darren K. Indyke and Richard D. Kahn.

The terms of the trust are not public, because they’re not part of the will itself. Epstein’s creation of the trust is commonly done by those who desire privacy. Of course, there is some surprise because the will and the trust were created just two days before he died. One of the most intriguing parts of Epstein’s will is that it lists his domicile (his permanent residence) as the U.S. Virgin Islands. Domicile is important in determining which jurisdiction controls the estate. Domicile must be proven in a probate court, and is usually accomplished with tax returns, a driver’s license, or documented time spent in the jurisdiction.

Another question about Epstein’s will, is whether it will even be declared valid. His will, and thus his entire trust, can be held invalid, if the will wasn’t properly executed and if it wasn’t properly witnessed or signed. There can’t be any fraud, undue influence, or duress. Since the will was made right before his suicide, there’s no certainty of his mental capacity.

His testamentary capacity, which means his mental ability make a valid will or estate, will probably be decided by a probate judge. If his estate planning documents are voided, the assets would transfer to the beneficiary of the estate, which is his brother Mark Epstein. However, Mark would still be liable for creditors’ claims and any alleged victims’ lawsuits.

Epstein’s $577 million in assets will not pass from his estate into his private trust, until all creditors’ claims have been satisfied in a probate court.

Legal experts expect a long, drawn-out, and complex process for deciding the future of Epstein’s wealth.

This sheds a little light on What Will Happen to Jeffrey Epstein’s Estate?

Reference: CBS News (August 21, 2019) “What we know about Jeffrey Epstein’s will, and what happens next with his estate”

Read Related articles at :

Here’s why a bitter legal battle could be ahead for Jeffrey Epstein’s estate

What Jeffrey Epstein’s Last-Minute Will Means for Accusers Trying to Recover Money From His Estate

Read more about other celebrity estates from our Previous Blogs at:

Luke Perry’s Estate Planning – How Well Did He Do?

Which Stars Won’t Leave Their Estates to Their Children?

Living Trusts

Do I Need a Revocable Living Trust?

Do I Need a Revocable Living Trust?  A revocable living trust is created with a written agreement or declaration that names a trustee to manage and administer the property of the grantor. If you’re a competent adult, you can establish an RLT. As the grantor, or creator of the trust, you can name any competent adult as your trustee, or you can use a bank or a trust company for this role. The grantor can also act as trustee throughout his lifetime.

Investopedia’s article from last fall entitled “Should You Set up a Revocable Living Trust?” explains that after it’s created, you must retitled assets—like investments, bank accounts, and real estate—into the trust. You no longer “own” those assets directly. Instead, they belong to the trust and don’t have to go through probate at your death. However, with a revocable living trust, you retain control of the assets while you’re alive, even though they no longer belong to you directly. A revocable living trust can be changed, and any income earned by the trust’s assets passes to you and is taxable. However, the assets themselves don’t transfer from the trust to your beneficiaries until your death.

Avoiding probate is the big benefit of a living trust, but other benefits like privacy protection and flexibility make it a good choice. A living trust can be used to help control a guardian’s spending habits for the benefit of minor children. It can also instruct another individual to act on your behalf, if you become incapacitated and need someone to make decisions for you. Should you become impaired or disabled, the trust can automatically appoint your trustee to oversee it and your financial affairs without a durable power of attorney.

Although there are several advantages to establishing a revocable living trust, there also some drawbacks:

Expense. Establishing a trust requires legal assistance, which is an expense.

Maintaining Records. Most of the time, you need to monitor it on an annual basis and make adjustments as needed (they don’t automatically adapt to changed circumstances, like a divorce or a new grandchild). There’s the trouble of ensuring that future assets are continuously registered to the trust.

Re-titling Property. When your RLT is established, property must be re-titled in the name of the trust, requiring additional time. Fees can apply to processing title changes.

Minimal Asset Protection. Despite the myth, a revocable living trust offers little asset protection beyond avoiding probate if you retain an ownership interest, such as naming yourself as trustee.

Administrative Expenses. There can also be additional professional fees, such as investment advisory and trustee fees, if you appoint a bank or trust company as the trustee.

There’s No Tax Break. Your assets in the RLT will continue to incur taxes on their gains or income and be subject to creditors and legal action.

Compared to wills, revocable trusts have more privacy, more control and flexibility over asset distribution. With a revocable living trust, you do most of the work up front, making the disposition of your estate easier and faster. However, an RLT requires more effort, and there is an expense in creating and maintaining it.

Work with an experienced estate planning attorney, if you are considering a revocable living trust.

Hopefully this answers the question : Do I Need a Revocable Living Trust?

Reference: Investopedia (Oct. 31, 2019) “Should You Set up a Revocable Living Trust?”

Read more related articles at:

What Is a Revocable Living Trust?

Choosing a Will or Revocable Living Trust

Also read our previous Blogs at:

What Do I Need to Know About Revocable Living Trusts?

How Do I Set Up a Living Trust?

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