As a Trust Beneficiary, Am I Required to Pay Taxes?
Trust Beneficiaries

As a Trust Beneficiary, Am I Required to Pay Taxes?

When an irrevocable trust makes a distribution, it deducts the income distributed on its own tax return and issues the beneficiary a tax form called a K-1. This form shows the amount of the beneficiary’s distribution that’s interest income, as opposed to principal. With that information, the beneficiary know how much she’s required to claim as taxable income when filing taxes.

Investopedia’s recent article on this subject asks “Do Trust Beneficiaries Pay Taxes?” The article explains that when trust beneficiaries receive distributions from the trust’s principal balance, they don’t have to pay taxes on the distribution. The IRS assumes this money was already taxed before it was put into the trust. After money is placed into the trust, the interest it accumulates is taxable as income—either to the beneficiary or the trust. The trust is required to pay taxes on any interest income it holds and doesn’t distribute past year-end. Interest income the trust distributes is taxable to the beneficiary who gets it.

The money given to the beneficiary is considered to be from the current-year income first, then from the accumulated principal. This is usually the original contribution with any subsequent deposits. It’s income in excess of the amount distributed. Capital gains from this amount may be taxable to either the trust or the beneficiary. All the amount distributed to and for the benefit of the beneficiary is taxable to her to the extent of the distribution deduction of the trust.

If the income or deduction is part of a change in the principal or part of the estate’s distributable income, then the income tax is paid by the trust and not passed on to the beneficiary. An irrevocable trust that has discretion in the distribution of amounts and retains earnings pays trust tax that is $3,011.50 plus 37% of the excess over $12,500.

The two critical IRS forms for trusts are the 1041 and the K-1. IRS Form 1041 is like a Form 1040. This is used to show that the trust is deducting any interest it distributes to beneficiaries from its own taxable income.

The trust will also issue a K-1. This IRS form details the distribution, or how much of the distributed money came from principal and how much is interest. The K-1 is the form that allows the beneficiary to see her tax liability from trust distributions.

The K-1 schedule for taxing distributed amounts is generated by the trust and given to the IRS. The IRS will deliver this schedule to the beneficiary, so that she can pay the tax. The trust will fill out a Form 1041 to determine the income distribution deduction that’s conferred to the distributed amount. Your estate planning attorney will be able to help you work through this process.

Trust distributions need to be done carefully.

Reference: Investopedia (July 15, 2019) “Do Trust Beneficiaries Pay Taxes?”

Do I Need a Beneficiary for my Checking Account?
Beneficiary Designations are Part of Good Estate Planning

Do I Need a Beneficiary for my Checking Account?

When you open up most investment accounts, you’ll be asked to designate a beneficiary. This is an individual who you name to benefit from the account when you pass away. Does this include checking accounts?

Investopedia’s recent article asks “Do Checking Accounts Have Beneficiaries?” The article explains that unlike other accounts, banks don’t require checking account holders to name beneficiaries. However, even though they’re not needed, you should consider naming beneficiaries for your bank accounts, if you want to protect your assets.

Banks usually offer their customers payable-on-death (POD) accounts. This type of account directs the bank to transfer the customer’s money to the beneficiary. The money in a POD bank account usually becomes part of a person’s estate when they die but is not included in probate, when the account holder dies.

To claim the money, the beneficiary just has to present herself at the bank, prove her identity and show a certified copy of the account holder’s death certificate.

You should note that if you are married and have a checking account converted into a POD-account and live in a community property state, your spouse automatically will be entitled to half the money they contributed during the marriage—despite the fact that another beneficiary is named after the account holder passes away. Spouses in non-community property states have a right to dispute the distribution of the funds in probate court.

If you don’t have the option of a POD account, you could name a joint account holder on your checking account. This could be a spouse or a child. You can simply have your bank add another name on the account. Be sure to take that person with you, because they’ll have to sign all their paperwork.

An advantage of having a joint account holder is that there’s no need to name a beneficiary, because that person’s name is already on the account. He or she will have access and complete control over the balance. However, a big disadvantage is that you have to share the account with that person, who may be financially irresponsible and leave you in a bind.

Remember, even though you may name a beneficiary or name a joint account holder, you should still draft a will. Speak with a qualified estate planning attorney to make sure about all your affairs, even if your accounts already have beneficiaries.

Beneficiary designations are part of good overall estate planning.

Reference: Investopedia (August 4, 2019) “Do Checking Accounts Have Beneficiaries?”

Should I Use a Trust to Protect My Children’s Inheritance?
Protect Children's Inheritances and Keep the Family Treasure in the Family Bloodline

Should I Use a Trust to Protect My Children’s Inheritance?

Parents with savings often want to protect their children’s future inheritances. Using a trust is a great way to do keep everything in the family bloodline.

nj.com’s recent article answers this question: “We have $1.5 million. Should we get a trust for our children’s inheritance?” According to the article, parents could first protect the assets for the benefit of the surviving spouse during the spouse’s lifetime.

After that, they can have the remainder of the assets pass in trusts for each of the children, until they reach a certain age or ages.

A lifetime trust is one that’s created during an individual’s lifetime. This is different from a trust that is created after a person’s lifetime through the operation of that person’s will.

Usually the individual who sets things up (the “Grantor”) will retain control over the assets, including the right to revoke the assets during his or her lifetime.

Another option is to have these types of trusts continue for the benefit of the grandchildren.

The children’s trusts can have instructions that the assets and income are to be used for the health, maintenance, education and support of the child.

The parents would need to name a trustee or co-trustee. This is the person who’s responsible for investing the assets, filing tax returns and paying taxes (if necessary). He or she will also distribute the assets, according to the terms that are laid out.

This is complicated business, so meet with an experienced estate planning attorney to determine the best strategies based on your circumstances and goals.

A revocable living trust provides a great foundation for your estate plan.

Reference: nj.com (October 16, 2019) “We have $1.5 million. Should we get a trust for our children’s inheritance?”