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Young Family

Estate Planning Is For Everyone

Estate planning is something anyone who is 18 years old or older needs to think about, advises the article “Estate planning for every stage of life from the Independent Record. It includes much more than a person’s last will and testament. It protects you from incapacity, provides the legal right to allow others to talk to your doctors if you can’t and takes care of your minor children, if an unexpected tragedy occurs. Let’s look at all the ages and stages where estate planning is needed.

Parents of young adults should discuss estate planning with their children. While parents devote decades to helping their children become independent adults, sometimes life doesn’t go the way you expect. A college freshman is more concerned with acing a class, joining a club and the most recent trend on social media. However, a parent needs to think about what happens when the child is over 18 and has a medical emergency. Parents have no legal rights to medical information, medical decision making or finances, once a child becomes a legal adult. Hospitals may not release private information and doctors can’t talk with parents, even in an extreme situation. Young adults need to have a HIPAA release, a durable power of medical attorney and a power of attorney for their finances created.

New parents also need estate planning. While it may be hard to consider while adjusting to having a new baby in the house, what would happen to that baby if something unexpected were to affect both parents? The estate planning attorney will create a last will and testament, which is used to name a guardian for any minor children, in case both parents pass. This also includes decisions that need to be made about the child’s education, medical treatment and even their social life. You’ll need to name someone to be the child’s guardian, and to be sure that they will raise your child the same way that you would.

An estate plan includes naming a conservator, who is a person with control over a minor child’s finances. You’ll want to name a responsible person who is trustworthy and good with handling money. It is possible to name the same person as guardian and conservator. However, it may be wise to separate the responsibilities.

An estate plan also ensures that your children receive their inheritance, when you think they will be responsible enough to handle it. If a minor child’s parents die and there is no  plan, the parent’s assets will be held by the court for the benefit of the child. Once the child turns 18, he or she will receive the entire amount in one lump sum. Few who are 18-years old are able to manage large sums of money. Estate planning helps you control how the money is distributed. This is also something to consider, when your children are the beneficiaries of any life insurance policies. An estate planning attorney can help you set up trusts, so the monies are distributed at the right time.

When people enter their ‘golden’ years—that is, they are almost retired—it is the time for estate plans to be reviewed. You may wish to name your children as power of attorney and medical power of attorney, rather than a sibling. It’s best to have people who will be younger than you for these roles as you age. This may also be the time to change how your wealth is distributed. Are your children old enough to be responsible with an inheritance? Do you want to create a legacy plan that includes charitable giving?

Lastly, update your estate plan any time there are changes in the family structure. Divorce, death, marriage or individuals with special needs all require a different approach to the basic estate plan. It’s a good idea to revisit an estate plan anytime there have been major changes in your relationships, to the law, or changes to your financial status.

Reference: Independent Record (March 1, 2020) “Estate planning for every stage of life

Read more relevant articles at:   ESTATE PLANNING IS FOR EVERYONE/globalwealthadvisors

You’re never too Young to Estate Plan

Also Read our previous gs at :  Creating an Estate Plan Should Be a New Year’s Resolution

                                                          Am I Too Young to Think About Estate Planning?

 

 

 

Health Crisis

Health Crisis Strikes, Do you have a plan?

A woman wakes up to hear her husband gasping for breath, unresponsive and in full cardiac arrest. He was only 55, he biked 25 to 50 miles every day, he ate right and was one of the healthiest people she knew. Yet, he was having a heart attack. He did not have his health care directives, and she did not know what his wishes were in the case of a health emergency.

The story, as related in “START WITH A PLAN (not a heart attack)” from OakPark.com, is not as unusual as one would think. What does make it unusual, was that both of these individuals are attorneys. They had never had an estate plan created or drafted documents.

As the woman sat by his hospital bed in the critical care unit after his surgery, she started thinking about the practical realities. If he remained unconscious for some time, how would she access his individual finances, his paycheck or pay the monthly bills? She would need to hire an attorney and seek guardianship from the court to handle his financial affairs. If he died, she’d have to hire an attorney and open a probate case.

Without a will in place, her husband’s estate would be deemed intestate, and the laws of the state, in her case, Illinois, would be applied to distribute his property. Half of his property would be distributed to his children and the other half to her.

That might mean she would have to borrow money from her own children to pay bills and cover their college tuition.

Her husband responded well to the surgery, but at one point he needed to be transferred to another hospital. As they travelled by ambulance to another hospital, a terrible thought occurred to her: what if the ambulance were in an accident and they were both killed? Who would rear their children? How long would it take to settle the estate, with no will?

Thankfully, the ambulance arrived safely at the hospital, her husband recovered from his heart attack and the first thing they attended to when he recovered was their estate plan.

It’s a dramatic story, but a telling one: everyone, no matter how healthy, needs to have an estate plan in place. That means a will, power of attorney, healthcare proxy, HIPAA release form and any other planning tools that each family’s situation may need.

Make an appointment to meet with an estate planning attorney to put your plan in place. Don’t wait until you have time, because you never know when you may run out of time.

Reference: Oak Park.com (Feb. 27, 2019) “START WITH A PLAN (not a heart attack)”

Elder Financial Abuse

How to Combat Elder Financial Abuse

One estimate is that the amount of elder financial fraud is $30 billion a year, defining it as the theft of money by thieves who include con artists, strangers, caregivers or trusted friends or family members. According to Consumer Reports, in the article “3 Critical Ways to Prevent Elder Financial Abuse,” these crimes are often not reported. Sometimes, the seniors are too embarrassed to admit that they were fooled, or they don’t want to put a family member at risk. They often don’t know they have been scammed, or are physically unable to articulate what has happened to them.

This is starting to change, as banks are starting to increase their reporting of suspected elder financial abuse. Last year, U.S. banks reported roughly 25,000 cases of suspected elder financial abuse to the U.S. Treasury. That’s more than double the amount reported in 2013, as reflected in data from the U.S. Treasury department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Bureau.

One reason behind the surge is demographics: although the baby boomers are getting older, they have a tremendous amount of assets and are vulnerable to being defrauded.

However, the increase in reported cases may also be bolstered by big pushes from the federal government, states, and the financial industry to fight elder financial abuse. New regulations are now in place to encourage people who are on the front lines for elder abuse: brokers, bankers and financial advisors.

FINRA, the self-regulatory agency that oversees brokers, now requires them to ask clients, no matter how young or old, to provide the name and contact information for a trusted family member or friend. If the broker believes that person is being exploited, they have someone to contact. The new regulations also allow brokers to put a hold on withdrawals from a client’s account, if they believe there may be elder financial abuse occurring. The hold is for 15 days but can be extended 10 more days.

From the federal government, the Senior Safe Act became law in 2018. It enables the employees of any financial institutions to report concerns about elder abuse, without fear of being held liable for disclosing private information. To qualify for this protection, financial institutions are required to provide training to staff about recognizing the abuse. At the state level, NASAA (the North American Securities Administrators Association, a group of state regulators) adopted a rule in 2016 which mandates that brokers and financial advisors report any suspected abuse to state authorities. The rule also allows them to stop withdrawals on accounts and protects brokers and advisors from liability, if they stop account disbursement. Sixteen states have enacted versions of the rule, and there are six more states working on legislation.

On a more personal level, there are three things family members and friends can do to prevent elder financial abuse. One is to stay in touch and ask questions of aging parents. Isolation and cognitive impairment are the biggest risk factors. Make sure that your parent is keeping up with bill paying, and whether he or she is in contact with new friends, strangers who may not have their best interests in mind.

If your parent is willing, start by offering to help with a few financial tasks, like bill paying. Keep it low key, by including a visit with the task. If you see things are not being handled well, stay on top of it.

Another step is to set up checks and balances, by making sure that critical legal documents are in place. There should be a will, a healthcare proxy, a HIPAA release form and a durable power of attorney. The durable power of attorney will let you pay bills and manage finances, if and when they can no longer manage. If there is no will or estate plan in place, make an appointment for your parent with a qualified estate planning attorney as soon as possible.

Consider streamlining aging parent’s finances. If they have too many credit cards and too many bank accounts, it may make things easier if they can pare things down to one bank and one credit card. Be very careful with retirement accounts, like 401(k)s and IRAs, to avoid any taxes and penalties.

Simplifying money management and being involved with your parent’s finances and their lives can help prevent financial elder abuse.

Reference: Consumer Reports (Feb. 22, 2019) “3 Critical Ways to Prevent Elder Financial Abuse”

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