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House

Don’t Give Your Adult Kids Your House

Don’t Give Your Adult Kids Your House

Gifting a house outright to an adult child or adding them to the property’s deed may avoid the hassle of probate, but doing so may bring along its own slew of issues. These problems range from a potentially large tax bill to the house being in danger if the child files for bankruptcy.

Sometimes parents transfer a home to their child to try to qualify for Medicaid, the government program that pays health care and nursing home bills for the indigent. But gifts or transfers made within five years of applying for Medicaid can lead to a penalty period when seniors are disqualified from receiving benefits.

If an adult child is gifted a house through inheritance or a will, they will also get a “step-up in tax basis.” Meaning the value of the house upon the conveyance will not be based on the date they acquired it, but rather when the previous owner acquired it. Kenneth Robinson of Rocky River, Ohio had a client that received his mother’s house as a gift – against his advice – prior to the mother’s death. The mother purchased the house in 1976 for $16,000, but the son acquired the property with a market value of $200,000 with a tax bill of $32,000 because of the $184,000 gain.

However, Section 2036 of the Internal Revenue Code says that if the mother retained a “life interest” in the property, which includes the right to continue living there, the home would remain in her estate rather than be considered a completed gift. There are specific rules for what constitutes a life interest, including the power to determine what happens to the house and liability for its bills. The executor of the person would then file gift tax return on the deceased’s behalf to show that the recipient was given a remainder interest, or the right to inherit at the person’s death.

See Liz Weston, Don’t Give Your Adult Kids Your House, Nerd Wallet, April 3, 2020.

Read more related articles at :

Liz Weston: Don’t give your adult kids your house

Don’t give your adult kids your house

Also, Read one of our previous Blogs at :

The Estate Planning Goal of What To Do with Mom’s House

 

Elder Law attorney

What Does It Mean to Be an Elder Law Attorney?

What Does It Mean to Be an Elder Law Attorney?

As we age, changes to our body, our health, our financial picture, and our family is ever-evolving. When we were young, we didn’t worry about infirmity, incapacity, or how we want our estates managed. But time marches on and those issues become the forefront of our lives. Being an elder law attorney means using our knowledge of the legal issue to help aging or disabled clients find solutions to problems as they arise and formulate a plan to avoid problems in the future. The work we do focuses on the needs of the client and may or may not always involve a legal solution.

Being an elder law attorney means we must have a working knowledge of many areas of the law, such as estate planning, asset protection, Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Veterans Benefits, long term health care insurance, guardianship, special needs trusts and disability planning, probate, trust administration, elder abuse and elder exploitation, nursing home discharge issues, patient rights, retirement benefits, health law, and mental health law. It’s a long list but most clients have issues that span across many of those areas and planning can be complex.

Being an elder law attorney means we practice using a holistic approach, thinking about the issue at hand, but also considering future issues that might arise and how to plan for them. Our job is to point out the potential “holes in the road” that may come up, and help our clients stay out of those holes. In addition, we must consider the financial and mental well-being of the family as a whole, which means having knowledge of community resources to provide support to those with non-legal needs such as caregiver stress or financial management.

Being an elder law attorney means we keep a box of tissues on our desks, provide adequate lighting for those with vision issues, decorate our offices with chairs that are easy to get in and out of, use a larger font on our websites, and only hire staff that are compassionate and have a genuine interest in the practice. Our clients may have hearing issues, and not technically savvy, so we must meet the client where he or she is comfortable, and communication is often done by “snail mail” rather than email or by phone.

Being an elder law attorney means that not all our clients are elderly. In my practice I serve special needs clients of all ages, from children to adults. My office must be wheelchair friendly and able to accommodate all family members who want to be involved in seeking solutions for their loved one, especially when the client is a child with special needs.

Being an elder law attorney means I must listen with a sympathetic ear, let my clients have time to tell their story, and not rush them to get to the issue at hand. This time is important not only for them but for me as well as it gives me a greater understanding of their needs and how I can help.

Being an elder law attorney means we go to hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living communities, and the client’s home. If a client can’t get to us, we go to them. Many times, being in their own home makes a difficult conversation a bit easier.

When choosing an elder law attorney look for someone who focuses his or her practice exclusively in the area of elder law, who has the expertise you need, the compassion to listen, and is willing to accommodate your needs before, during, and after the initial consultation.

 

This article was provided by Teresa K. Bowman, Attorney at Law, Founder of Teresa K. Bowman P.A., one of Florida’s TOP Elder Law and Estate Planning Law Firms.  Attorney Bowman and her firm are Members of the National ElderCare Matters Alliance and have a Featured Listing on ElderCareMatters.com– America’s National Directory of Elder Care / Senior Care Resources to help families plan for and deal with the issues of Aging.


What Does An Elder Law Attorney Do?

5 SMART TIPS FOR HIRING AN ELDER LAW ATTORNEY

Also, read one of our previous blogs at :

Can an Elder Law Attorney Help My Family?

Coroanvirus dollar bill

Why Gifting during Volatile Markets Makes Sense

Why Gifting during Volatile Markets Makes Sense

Gifting assets to a trust for children or grandchildren is often an important part of an estate plan. The recent article “Is Now a Good Time to Make a Gift?” from The National Law Review takes a close look into the strategy of placing non-cash assets into a trust, without exceeding the annual gift tax exclusion amount or the Federal Gift Tax Exemption. If those assets increase in value later, the increases will further enhance the gift for beneficiaries.

Taxes on gifts made to a trust to benefit children and grandchildren are based primarily on the value of the gift. Annual exclusion gifts, that is, transfers of assets or cash that do not exceed the annual gift tax exclusion, are currently set at $15,000 per recipient per year. A married couple may give up to $30,000 per person in any calendar year. Many annual exclusion gifts do not require a Federal Gift Tax Return (Form 709), although it would be wise to speak with an estate planning attorney to make sure that this applies to you, since every situation is different.

Annual exclusion gifts are one way to reduce the overall value of the estate, but they do not reduce the Federal Estate Tax Exemption of the person making the gift.

Gifts in excess of the annual exclusion amount may still avoid gift taxes, if the person making the gift applies their gift tax exemption by filing IRS Form 709. The gift tax exemption is unified with the estate tax exemption, at $11.58 million per person in 2020. Gifts that are bigger than the annual exclusion of $15,000 per year, reduce the $11.58 million exemption for purposes of both the gift tax and the estate tax.

For example, if a person were to make taxable gifts of $1.0 million to a child in 2020, their lifetime gift tax and estate tax exemption will be reduced to $10.58 million. If that person were to die in 2020 when the applicable estate tax exemption is $10.58 million, then only estate assets in excess of the exemption will be subject to estate tax.

Given the uncertainly of the gift and estate tax exemptions, management and timing of these gifts is particularly important. If no legislative action occurs, these generous estate and gift tax exemptions will sunset at the end of 2025. They will return to the 2010 level of $5.0 million, indexed for inflation.

The exemptions need to be carefully used and budgeted, because federal estate tax starts at 18% and rises to 40% on all amounts over the exemption. Like the exemption, these rate rates may be changed by future elections and/or tax law changes.

If you are concerned about an estate becoming taxable, the current decline in asset values makes this a good opportunity to transfer more of the estate into trust for beneficiaries. The transfers can decrease the impact of a reduction in the exemption amount, as well as any changes to the tax rates. The currently reduced value of stocks and many other investments may also present an opportunity to reduce future taxes.

The best way forward would be to have a conversation with an estate planning attorney to review your overall estate plan and how moving assets into trusts during a time of lowered value could benefit the estate and its beneficiaries.

Reference: The National Law Review (April 10, 2020) “Is Now a Good Time to Make a Gift?”

Read more related articles at:

Estate Planning in a Volatile Market

Inheritance tax planning during the coronavirus crisis

Also read one of our previous Blogs at :

How Does the IRS Know if I Make Gifts To My Grandchildren?

 

 

estate planning COVID-19

The Coronavirus Pandemic Presents Ample Reasons to Reevaluate Your Estate Plan

The Coronavirus Pandemic Presents Ample Reasons to Reevaluate Your Estate Plan

The coronavirus health emergency is a reminder that life is unpredictable, and it makes sense to be prepared. It may sound self-serving, but the threats to life and finances posed by the pandemic offer ample reason to reevaluate your estate plan — or create one if you haven’t already.

Experts recommend that you will need to revisit your plan after certain key life events, including changes in health, finances, or family status. Unfortunately, this global health crisis can affect all of those aspects of your life. You should make sure you have these essential documents in place to protect yourself and your family:

  • Medical Directives. A medical directive may encompass a number of different documents, including a health care proxy, a durable power of attorney for health care, a living will, and medical instructions. The exact document or documents will depend on your state’s laws and the choices you make. Both a health care proxy and a durable power of attorney for health care designate someone you choose to make health care decisions for you if you are unable to do so yourself. A living will instructs your health care provider to withdraw life support if you are terminally ill or in a vegetative state. A broader medical directive may include the terms of a living will, but will also provide instructions if you are in a less serious state of health, but are still unable to direct your health care yourself.
  • Power of Attorney. A power of attorney allows a person you appoint — your “attorney-in-fact” — to act in your place for financial purposes when and if you ever become incapacitated. In that case, the person you choose will be able to step in and take care of your financial affairs. Without a durable power of attorney, no one can represent you unless a court appoints a conservator or guardian. That court process takes time, costs money, and the judge may not choose the person you would prefer. In addition, under a guardianship or conservatorship, your representative may have to seek court permission to take planning steps that she could implement immediately under a simple durable power of attorney.
  • Will. A will is a legally-binding statement directing who will receive your property at your death. If you do not have a will, the state will determine how your property is distributed. A will also appoints a legal representative (called an executor or a personal representative) to carry out your wishes. A will is especially important if you have minor children because it allows you to name a guardian for the children. However, a will covers only probate property. Many types of property or forms of ownership pass outside of probate. Jointly-owned property, property in trust, life insurance proceeds and property with a named beneficiary, such as IRAs or 401(k) plans, all pass outside of probate and aren’t covered under a will.
  • Trust. A trust is a legal arrangement through which one person (or an institution, such as a bank or law firm), called a “trustee,” holds legal title to property for another person, called a “beneficiary.” Trusts have one set of beneficiaries during those beneficiaries’ lives and another set — often their children — who begin to benefit only after the first group has died. There are several different reasons for setting up a trust. The most common reason is to avoid probate. If you establish a revocable living trust that terminates when you die, any property in the trust passes immediately to the beneficiaries. This can save time and money for the beneficiaries. Provided they are well-drafted, another advantage of trusts is their continuing effectiveness even if the donor dies or becomes incapacitated.
  • Beneficiary Designations. Although not necessarily a part of your estate plan, at the same time you create an estate plan, you should make sure your retirement plan beneficiary designations are up to date. If you don’t name a beneficiary, the distribution of benefits may be controlled by state or federal law or according to your particular retirement plan. Some plans automatically distribute money to a spouse or children. Although others may leave it to the retirement plan holder’s estate, this could have negative tax consequences. The only way to control where the money goes is to name a beneficiary.

Contact your attorney to make sure your estate plan is complete. Many attorneys are set up to meet with clients remotely, and states are beginning to temporarily relax their rules regarding requirements that documents be notarized in person. This is why The Coronavirus Pandemic Presents Ample Reasons to Reevaluate Your Estate Plan.

For more related articles visit:

A Guide To Estate Planning During The Coronavirus Pandemic

The Coronavirus Has Americans Scrambling to Set Their Estate Plans. Here Are Some Key Things to Know.

Also read one of our previous Blogs at:

Coronavirus News Should Make You Think about Estate Planning

Estate planning every age

If Not Now, When? Is It the Time for Estate Planning

If Not Now, When? Is It the Time for Estate Planning

What else could possibly go wrong? You might not want to ask that question, given recent events. A global pandemic, markets in what feels like free fall, schools closed for an extended period of time—these are just a few of the challenges facing our communities, our nation and our world. The time is now, in other words, to be sure that everyone has their estate planning completed, advises Kiplinger in the article “Coronavirus Legal Advice: Get Your Business and Estate in Order Now.”

Business owners from large and small sized companies are contacting estate planning attorney’s offices to get their plans done. People who have delayed having their estate plans done or never finalized their plans are now getting their affairs in order. What would happen if multiple family members got sick, and a family business was left unprotected?

Because the virus is recognized as being especially dangerous for people who are over age 60 or have underlying medical issues, which includes many business owners and CEOs, the question of “What if I get it?” needs to be addressed. Not having a succession plan or an estate plan, could lead to havoc for the company and the family.

Establishing a Power of Attorney is a key part of the estate plan, in case key decision makers are incapacitated, or if the head of the household can’t take care of paying bills, taxes or taking care of family or business matters. For that, you need a Durable Power of Attorney.

Another document needed now, more than ever: is an Advance Health Care Directive. This explains how you want medical decisions to be made, if you are too sick to make these decisions on your own behalf. It tells your health care team and family members what kind of care you want, what kind of care you don’t want and who should make these decisions for you.

This is especially important for people who are living together without the legal protection that being married provides. While some states may recognize registered domestic partners, in other states, medical personnel will not permit someone who is not legally married to another person to be involved in their health care decisions.

Personal information that lives only online is also at risk. Most bills today don’t arrive in the mail, but in your email inbox. What happens if the person who pays the bill is in a hospital, on a ventilator? Just as you make sure that your spouse or children know where your estate plan documents are, they also need to know who your estate planning attorney is, where your insurance policies, financial records and legal documents are and your contact list of key friends and family members.

Right now, estate planning attorneys are talking with clients about a “Plan C”—a plan for what would happen if heirs, beneficiaries and contingent beneficiaries are wiped out. They are adding language that states which beneficiaries or charities should receive their assets, if all of the people named in the estate plan have died. This is to maintain control over the distribution of assets, even in a worst-case scenario, rather than having assets pass via the rules of intestate succession. Without a Plan C, an entire estate could go to a distant relative, regardless of whether you wanted that to happen.

Reference: Kiplinger (March 16, 2020) “Coronavirus Legal Advice: Get Your Business and Estate in Order Now.”

Learn more about this topic at:

When Is The Best Time To Plan Your Estate?

A Guide To Estate Planning During The Coronavirus Pandemic

And read one of our previous Blogs at :

Coronavirus News Should Make You Think about Estate Planning

 

 

Financial Disaster

Are You One of the Many Headed toward Financial Disaster?

Are You One of the Many Headed toward Financial Disaster? You may be saving for retirement, paying down debt or simply budgeting for your everyday expenses. Whatever your goal is, it’s critical to have a plan in place. Some planning now can go a long way in making sure your finances are as healthy as possible. Without any type of plan, you’re just blindly throwing your money around and hoping for the best. And now with the impending doom of the Corona Virus, finances will be affected more than ever!

Motley Fool’s recent article entitled “A Whopping Number of Older Adults May Be Headed Toward a Financial Disaster” says that millions of older adults are making a critical mistake as they plan for the future. If they don’t make any changes soon, it could be extremely expensive.

More than one-third (34%) of baby boomers admit that they haven’t conducted any financial planning whatsoever in the last two years, according to the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors. Therefore, they haven’t planned for retirement, managed a budget, set any goals, reviewed their investments, considered their insurance needs, or done any tax or estate planning. It’s not just baby boomers who aren’t planning. Almost a quarter (24%) of Gen Xers also say they haven’t done any financial planning over the past two years. The generations most likely to have thought about the future are the millennial generation and Gen Z — only 16% and 15%, respectively, said that they haven’t done any recent financial planning.

While all of us should be thinking about our future plans, it’s even more essential for older Americans to focus on their finances. If you’re close to retirement age and haven’t reviewed your investments or thought about your retirement plan recently, you’ll have a hard time knowing if you’re on track. The longer you wait to know if you’re off track, the more difficult it’ll be to make changes and to catch up.

Baby boomers should have plans in place, in case the worst happens. Review your insurance and make an estate plan to be certain that your family is protected if something happens to you. Look at your plans regularly to make sure everything is up to date.

The first part of creating a financial plan is to set goals, like preparing for retirement, paying down your debt, or creating an emergency fund. Next, examine your money situation to find extra cash to put toward those goals. Begin monitoring your spending to get a good idea of just where your money is going every month. It’s a lot harder to stay on a budget and save more, if you don’t know how much you’re spending. Once you get into the habit of tracking your spending, it’ll be easier to discover parts of your budget to cut back. You can start reallocating that money toward your financial goals.

You should also remember that you’ll need to review your plan regularly to make adjustments when needed. This is especially vital when saving for retirement, because there many factors to consider as you’re saving. At least once a year, check that your retirement savings goal is still accurate, and decide whether your current savings are on track to reach that goal. Take a look at your investments to see if your asset allocation is still aligned with your risk tolerance. Make sure you are not One of the Many Headed toward Financial Disaster?

Reference: Motley Fool (Feb. 8, 2020) “A Whopping Number of Older Adults May Be Headed Toward a Financial Disaster”

Read More related articles at:

Credit markets signal the US risks heading towards a financial crisis

Also read one of our previous Blogs at: 

Estate Planning Is For Everyone

 

What is the Difference between Guardianship and Power of Attorney?

What is the Difference between Guardianship and Power of Attorney? Protecting yourself or a loved one can take many different forms, since aging takes a toll on the ability to handle financial and medical decisions. In most situations, guardianship or a power of attorney does the trick, says the article “Guardianships vs. Powers of Attorney” from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.  How to know which is the best one to use?

A guardianship is a court-authorized assignment of surrogate decision-making power for the benefit of a person who has lost the ability to make informed decisions on their own, often described as a person who has become incapacitated. The decisions that another person can make on their behalf can be very broad, or they can be very specific.

If a person becomes incapacitated, either through a slowly progressing illness like dementia or quickly, as the result of an accident, a judge will appoint a person or sometimes an organization to handle health care and financial decisions. The court-appointed guardian or organization could be a person or agency you have never heard of and would not know your family or anything about you.

Yes, that is scary. However, guardianship takes place when families do not plan in advance to appoint a surrogate decision maker, also known as an “agent.”

Here’s even more scary news: once the court has appointed a guardian, that relationship may continue for the rest of the incapacitated person’s life. That means annual accountings and involvement with the court, legal fees and other professional fees the guardian or court deems necessary.

There are some guardians who have made headlines for stealing money and making care decisions that the individual and their families did not want.

Meeting with an estate planning attorney to prepare for incapacity as part of an overall estate plan is a far better way. Why don’t more people do it?

  • They aren’t aware of the importance of power of attorney.
  • They don’t want to spend the money.
  • They don’t know who to choose as their power of attorney
  • They don’t want to think about incapacity or death.

In contrast to a court-supervised lifetime guardianship, a properly drafted power of attorney can provide for an agent to make a variety of financial and medical decisions. The person named as a power of attorney (the agent) can serve for the person’s lifetime, just like a guardian.

This is the most fundamental estate planning document, after the last will and testament. Once it’s prepared, you can always change your mind and you or your agent never need to go to court. Hopefully this shed some light  on what the difference between a Guardianship and a Power of Attorney is.

Reference: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Feb. 24, 2020) “Guardianships vs. Powers of Attorney”

Read other articles pertaining to this subject at : THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POWERS  OF ATTORNEY AND GUARDIANSHIPS/AARP

                                                                                                          Power of attorney and guardianship: What’s the difference?/care.com

You can also read some of our previous Blogs at :

Will Florida’s New Legislation Help Seniors in Guardianships?

When Do I Need a Power of Attorney?

COVID

C19 UPDATE: Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now

C19 UPDATE: Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now.

Though it may be hard not to panic when the grocery store shelves are empty, the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 keeps rising, and we see sobering statistics across the globe … we will not overcome this challenge with a panicked response.

Nonetheless, there are certain things we all need to be doing right now – and your public health officials are the best resource on how to stay personally safe and help prevent the virus from spreading. In fact, a March 16, 2020 Kiplinger article notes that the current crisis is serving as a wake-up call for many people to meet with their estate planning lawyer and get their estate plan in order.

When it comes to the seriousness of this outbreak, however, there also are some critical estate planning decisions you should make – or review – right now.

Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Who will make medical decisions for me should I become severely ill and unable to make these decisions myself?
  2. Who will make my financial decisions in that same situation — for example, who will be authorized to sign my income tax return, write checks or pay my bills online?
  3. Who is authorized to take care of my minor children in the event of my severe illness? What decisions are they authorized to make? How will they absorb the financial burden?
  4. If the unthinkable happens – what arrangements have I made for the care of my minor children, any family members with special needs, my pets or other vulnerable loved ones?
  5. How will my business continue if I were to become seriously ill and unable to work, even remotely … or in the event of my death?

These are the most personal decisions to make right now to protect yourself and your loved ones during this emergency. Now is also a good time to ask yourself if you have plans in place for the smooth transfer of your assets and preservation of your legacy.

We are ready to help walk you through these decisions, understand the ramifications of your choices, and memorialize your plans in binding legal documents. We are currently offering no-contact initial conferences remotely if you prefer. Book a call now and let us help you make the right choices for yourself and your loved ones. We can help you with Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now!

Check out these related articles:     

Trump declares coronavirus outbreak a national emergency/ Washingtonpost

Coronavirus Legal Advice: Get Your Business and Estate in Order Now

Also read one of our previous Blogs:         Health Crisis Strikes, Do you have a plan?

Power of Attorney

What Is So Important About Powers Of Attorney?

What Is So Important About Powers Of Attorney? Powers of attorney or POA’s,  can provide significant authority to another person, if you are unable to do so. These powers can include the right to access your bank accounts and to make decisions for you.

AARP’s article from last October entitled, “Powers of Attorney: Crucial Documents for Caregiving,” describes the different types of powers of attorney.

Just like it sounds, a specific power of attorney restricts your agent to taking care of only certain tasks, such as paying bills or selling a house. This power is typically only on a temporary basis.

A general power of attorney provides your agent with sweeping authority. The agent has the authority to step into your shoes and handle all of your legal and financial affairs.

The authority of these POA’s can stop at the time you become incapacitated. Durable powers of attorney may be specific or general. However, the “durable” part means your agent retains the authority, even if you become physically or mentally incapacitated. In effect, your family probably won’t need to petition a court to intervene, if you have a medical crisis or have severe cognitive decline like late stage dementia.

In some instances, medical decision-making is part of a durable POA for health care. This can also be addressed in a separate document that is just for health care, like a health care surrogate designation.

There are a few states that recognize “springing” durable powers of attorney. With these, the agent can begin using her authority, only after you become incapacitated. Other states don’t have these, which means your agent can use the document the day you sign the durable POA.

A well-drafted POA helps your agent help you, because she can keep the details of your life addressed, if you cannot. That can be things like applying for financial assistance or a public benefit, such as Medicaid, or verifying that your utilities stay on and your taxes get paid. Attempting to take care of any of these things without the proper document can be almost impossible.

In the absence of proper incapacity legal planning, your loved ones will need to initiate a court procedure known as a guardianship or conservatorship. However, these hearings can be expensive, time-consuming and contested by family members who don’t agree with moving forward.

Don’t wait to do this. Every person who’s at least age 18 should have a POA in place. If you do have a POA, be sure that it’s up to date. Ask an experienced elder law or estate planning attorney to help you create these documents.

Reference: AARP (October 31, 2019) “Powers of Attorney: Crucial Documents for Caregiving”

Read more about this subject at:     Why Power of Attorney is So Important for Seniors

Power of Attorney/americanbar.org

You can also read one of our previous Blogs at :     Can I Create a Power of Attorney without Giving Up Control?

 

Elder Law

When Do I Need an Elder Law Attorney?

Elder law is different from estate law, but they frequently address many of the same issues. Estate planning contemplates your finances and property to best provide for you and your family while you’re still alive but incapacitated. It also concerns itself with the estate you leave to your loved ones when you die, minimizing probate complications and potential estate tax bills. Elder law contemplates these same issues but also the scenario when you may need some form of long-term care, even your eligibility for Medicaid should you need it.

A recent article from The Balance’s asks “Do You or a Family Member Need to Hire an Elder Law Attorney?” According to the article there are a variety of options to adjust as economically and efficiently as possible to plan for all eventualities. An elder law attorney can discuss these options with you.

Medicaid is a complicated subject, and really requires the assistance of an expert. The program has rigid eligibility guidelines in the event you require long-term care. The program’s benefits are income- and asset-based. However, you can’t simply give everything away to qualify, if you think you might need this type of care in the near future. There are strategies that should be implemented because the “spend down” rules and five-year “look back” period reverts assets or money to your ownership for qualifying purposes, if you try to transfer them to others. An elder law attorney will know these rules well and can guide you.

You’ll need the help and advice of an experienced elder law attorney to assist with your future plans, if one or more of these situations apply to you:

  • You’re in a second (or later) marriage;
  • You’re recently divorced;
  • You’ve recently lost a spouse or another family member;
  • Your spouse is incapacitated and requires long-term care;
  • You own one or more businesses;
  • You have real estate in more than one state;
  • You have a disabled family member;
  • You’re disabled;
  • You have minor children or an adult “problem” child;
  • You don’t have children;
  • You’d like to give a portion of your estate to charity;
  • You have significant assets in 401(k)s and/or IRAs; or
  • You have a taxable estate for estate tax purposes.

If you have any of these situations, you should seek the help of an elder law attorney.

If you fail to do so, you’ll most likely give a sizeable percentage of your estate to the state, an ex-spouse, or the IRS.

State probate laws are very detailed as to what can and can’t be included in a will, trust, advance medical directive, or financial power of attorney. These laws control who can and can’t serve as a personal representative, trustee, health care surrogate, or attorney-in-fact under a power of attorney.

Hiring an experienced elder law attorney can help you and your family avoid simple but expensive mistakes, if you or your family attempt this on your own.

Reference: The Balance (Jan. 21, 2020) “Do You or a Family Member Need to Hire an Elder Law Attorney?”

Read more at:

What Does An Elder Law Attorney Do?

What is Elder Law and How Can an Elder Law Attorney Help Me?

Also read one of our previous blogs at :

Elder Law Attorney Can Help Plan for Long-Term Care Costs

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