What Types of Long-Term Care is Available for Veterans?
VA Long-Term Care Benefits for Veterans

What Types of Long-Term Care is Available for Veterans?

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs offers some funding programs that can help offset the cost of some types of long-term care.

U.S. News & World Report’s recent article, “Veteran Benefits for Assisted Living,” explains that many senior living companies try to help many veterans maximize their long-term care benefits, which in some cases can significantly reduce the cost of senior living.

Note that the VA won’t pay for a veteran’s rent in an assisted living facility. However, VA benefits may pay for some of the extra services required, like nursing assistance, help with bathing and toileting, and possibly meals.

There are a variety of long-term benefits that may help, based on a vet’s specific service history and eligibility. The most commonly used benefits are the Aid & Attendance Pension. Another common benefit is the Survivor’s Pension for spouses of a deceased veteran with wartime service.

The VA’s Aid & Attendance and Housebound program is part of the pension benefits paid to veterans and survivors. The VA says these long-term care benefits are paid, in addition to monthly pension. A vet must satisfy one of the potential conditions, including:

  • Requiring the aid of another person to perform personal functions, like bathing, dressing, eating, toileting, or staying safe from hazards;
  • Being disabled and bedridden, above what would be thought of as recovery from a course of treatment, such as surgery;
  • Being a patient in a nursing home due to physical or mental incapacity; and
  • Having very poor eyesight (5/200 corrected visual acuity or less in both eyes) or a field of vision limited to five degrees or less.

Vets may qualify for these long-term care benefits, which are added to the standard monthly pension, when he or she is “substantially confined to your immediate premises because of permanent disability,” the VA says. Eligibility for the program is based on a case by case basis and involves a review by the VA.

It’s important to begin the application process early, rather than waiting for a crisis to occur. Ask an experienced estate planning or elder law attorney to help you and to discuss your long-term care options.

Learn more about VA pension planning.

Reference: U.S. News & World Report (August 12, 2019) “Veteran Benefits for Assisted Living”

Why You Need a Power of Attorney in Your Estate Plan
A Good Estate Plan Includes a Power of Attorney

Why You Need a Power of Attorney in Your Estate Plan

A power of attorney is an important legal document in your estate plan that allows a person, known as the principal, to designate a person of their choice to become their agent, acting on their behalf. This is usually done when the principal is unable to manage their financial affairs due to disability, illness or incapacity. It must be done while the principal is still competent, notes Delco Times in the article “What’s the difference between guardianship and power of attorney?” There are also instances when power of attorney is used when the principal is unable to conduct their own affairs, because they are traveling or are deployed overseas. A good estate plan includes more than just a will. A power of attorney is an important part.

Related documents are the health care power of attorney and the durable power of attorney. A durable financial power of attorney is a document where the principal designates the powers that the agent may exercise over their finances. The powers granted by this document can be used by the agent, regardless of the principal’s capacity or disability.

The principal has the option to grant very broad authority to their agent. For instance, the principal could give their agent the authority to gift all their assets, while they are still living. That’s why it is very important for the specific provisions in the power of attorney to be carefully reviewed and tailored to the principal’s wishes. There are risks in naming an agent, since they are able to exercise complete control over the principal’s assets. The agent must be 100% trustworthy.

A health care power of attorney allows an agent to make decisions about the principal’s health. Note that this document is operative only when a copy is provided to the attending physician, and the physician determines that the principal is incompetent.

Both health care power of attorney and financial power of attorney may be revoked by the principal at any time and for any reason.

If the principal has not had these documents prepared in advance and then becomes incompetent by reason of injury, illness, or mental health issues, they may not have the legal right to sign the power of attorney. When this happens, it is necessary for a guardianship proceeding to occur, so that other people may be named to take charge of the person’s financial and health affairs. Advance planning is always preferred.

If an individual is born with a disability that impacts their capacity and upon attaining legal age, does not have the capacity to sign a power of attorney, then a guardianship proceeding will be necessary. The court must determine if the person is truly incapacitated and if there might be an alternative to appointing a guardian. Once the guardian is appointed, the principal no longer has the legal right to make decisions on their own behalf.

A guardianship is a much more restrictive tool than a power of attorney. For one thing, the power of attorney generally does not need the involvement of the court. There is always the possibility that a guardian is appointed who does not know the family or the individual. A durable power of attorney allows a person to appoint someone they know and trust to help them and their family, if and when they become incapacitated.

Speak with your estate planning attorney about how power of attorney works, and when guardianship issues might arise. Being prepared in advance by having the right documents in place, is always better than having the family going to court and hoping that the right decisions are made.

See how a durable power of attorney is a critical piece of a good estate plan.

Reference: Delco Times (May 8, 2019) “What’s the difference between guardianship and power of attorney?”

How Much Money Should I Put into a Special Needs Trust for my Child?
Special Needs Trust Planning

How Much Money Should I Put into a Special Needs Trust for my Child?

One of the toughest things about planning for a child with special needs is trying to calculate the amount of money it’s going to take to provide both while the parents are alive and after the parents pass away. A special needs trust is a great way to set aside money for a special needs loved one to provide for them while at the same time preserving their ability to receive government benefits.

Kiplinger’s recent article asks “How Much Should Go into Your Special Needs Trust?” The article explains that it’s not uncommon for folks to have done some estate planning but not necessarily special needs estate planning. And they haven’t thought about how much money they should earmark to fund that trust someday and which assets would be the best to use.

Special needs estate planning involves creating a special needs trust that allows a person with a disability continue to receive certain public benefits. Typically, ownership of assets more than $2,000 would make the individual ineligible for certain public benefits. Assets held in a special needs trust don’t count toward this amount.

A child with special needs can generate multiple expenses. The precise amount will be based on the needs and lifestyle of the family and the child’s capabilities.

When the parents die, this budget must be increased because the things the parents did must be monetized.

A special needs trust usually isn’t funded until the parents’ death. Then, the trust would need to file a tax return each year and pay taxes.

There are also legal and trust administration expenses to think about. Public program benefits can in many cases offset many of the above-mentioned costs.

It’s vital to conduct a complete analysis of the future costs to provide for a child with special needs so that parents can start saving and making adjustments in their planning.

Speak with an elder law or estate planning attorney about special needs trusts.

Learn more about special needs trusts.

Reference: Kiplinger (June 10, 2019) “How Much Should Go into Your Special Needs Trust?”

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