A Power of Attorney and a Trust Protect You – Not Just Your Heirs
Power of Attorney and Trust are Meant for the Living, Not Just Heirs

A Power of Attorney and a Trust Protect You – Not Just Your Heirs

A good power of attorney is meant for you while you are alive. In similar fashion, a trust also helps you, not just your heirs. Experts urge people to develop estate plans to make sure you get to choose who will inherit from you and how much, and to select additional options that are available through legal documents, like trust agreements. It can be easy to procrastinate about putting the time and effort into going through this process, if you do not see a direct benefit to yourself. However, having a power of attorney and a trust can also have a dramatic effect on your life. You can protect yourself – not just your heirs – with your estate plan.

Living the Dream

You can have your elder law attorney draft documents that can make it possible for you to live your dream life, without a care in the world. Let’s say that you want to sail around the world for a few years or serve a tour of duty in the 50+ section of the Peace Corps. You cannot unplug 100 percent from the everyday world. Someone will have to pay your unavoidable bills, file your taxes and manage your money, when you are away and out of reach.

If you know someone whom you can trust without reservation, your lawyer can draft a financial power of attorney for the person you designate (your agent) to handle as many or as few business matters as you specify. You can revoke the power of attorney whenever you want, as long as you have the legal capacity to do so.

In other words, if the law would allow you to draft a valid power of attorney now, you have the legal capacity to revoke one. If you have become incompetent, for example, from an illness or injury, you cannot change the power of attorney, until or unless you regain competency.

Planning for the Worst

Your power of attorney will automatically expire, if you become incapacitated, unless you make sure that the document is a “durable” power of attorney. Being durable means that, at the time that you signed the paper, you intended for the document to continue in effect, if you could not manage matters for yourself.

If you do not have a durable power of attorney and one day you have a stroke or a catastrophic car crash, by way of example, the courts will decide who will make your financial decisions for you. Your family will have to file a request with the court (and pay the court costs to do so), wait for a hearing date, and get a ruling from a judge – a person who has never met you or your family. By the way, the judge will be required to appoint an independent attorney to represent you against your family, to protect your interests. If you prefer to have control over this decision rather than a total stranger, get a durable power of attorney.

Trusts are for the Living

Many people think of setting up a trust as a way to pass their assets to their loved ones privately and quickly, without having to go through the probate courts. While that is one of the purposes for trusts, you can also set up a living trust to stipulate how you want your assets, investments and other financial matters handled, if you become incapacitated.

You can even lay out how you want your business run, if you own a company. You can name someone to serve as your guardian and name a conservator who will manage your finances. You can also let a total stranger make these decisions.

Be sure to talk with an elder law attorney in your area, because this article is about the general law.  Your state’s rules might vary from the general law.

Find out more about how a power of attorney and trust can benefit you today.

References:

American Bar Association. Power of Attorney. (Accessed April 4, 2019) https://www.americanbar.org/groups/real_property_trust_estate/resources/estate_planning/power_of_attorney/

Wills v. Trusts: What’s Right for You?

It’s a good idea to take the time and make the effort to create an estate plan to take care of your estate — no matter if it’s a condo apartment and a housecat or a big house and lots of money in the bank — just in case something unexpected occurs tomorrow. That’s the advice from AZ Big Media in the article “The pros and cons of wills vs. trusts.”

Estate planning is the area of the law that focuses on the disposition of assets and expenses, when a person dies. The goal is to take care of the “business side” of life while you are living, so your family and loved ones don’t have to pick up the pieces after you are gone. It’s much more expensive, time-consuming and stressful for the survivors to do this after death, than it is if you plan in advance.

You have likely heard the words “trust” and “will” as part of estate planning. What are the differences between the two, and how do you know which one you need?

A will is the most commonly used legal document for leaving instructions about your property after you die. It is also used to name an executor — the person who will be in charge of your assets, their distribution, paying taxes and any estate expenses after you die. The will is very important, if you have minor children. This is how you will name guardians to raise your children, if something unexpected occurs to you and your partner, spouse or co-parent. The will is also the document you use to name the person who you would like to care for your pets, if you have any.

Burial instructions are not included in wills, since the will is not usually read for weeks or sometimes months after a person passes. It’s also not the right way to distribute funds that have been taken care of through the use of beneficiary designations or joint ownership on accounts or assets.

Another document used in estate planning is a trust. There are many different types of trusts, from revocable trusts, which you control as long as you are alive, and irrevocable trusts, which are controlled by trustees. There are too many to name in one article, but if there is something that needs to be accomplished in an estate plan, there’s a good chance there is a special trust designed to do it. An estate planning attorney will be able to tell you if you need a trust, and what purpose it will serve.

Trusts can be used by anyone with assets or property.

A will can be a very simple document. It requires proper formats and formalities to ensure that it is valid. If you try to do this on your own, your heirs will be the ones to find out if you have done it properly.  If it is not done correctly, the court will deem it invalid and your estate will be “intestate,” that is, without a will.

Many people believe that they should put all their assets into a trust to avoid probate. In some cases, this may be useful. However, there are many states where probate is not an onerous process, and this is not the reason for setting up trusts.

A trust won’t eliminate taxes completely, nor will it eliminate the need for any estate administration. However, it may make passing certain assets to another person or another generation easier. Your estate planning attorney will be able to guide you through this process.

Whether you use a will or a trust, or as is most common, a combination of the two, you need an estate plan that includes other documents, including power of attorney and health care power of attorney. These two particular documents are used while you are living, so that someone you name can make financial decisions (power of attorney) and medical health decisions (health care power of attorney) if you should become incapacitated, through illness or injury.

Speak with an estate planning attorney. Every person’s situation is a little different, and an estate planning attorney will create an estate plan that works for you and protects your family.

Reference: AZ Big Media (March 21, 2019) “The pros and cons of wills vs. trusts”

How Do Family Relationships Mess Up Estate Planning?

According to a recent Key Private Bank poll of financial advisors, 80% said that working through family issues is the most difficult aspect of estate planning.

With more and more blended families, the issues of equitable distributions among family members becomes even more complex. The interaction between parents, children, step-parents, and step-children can be tense in the estate-planning process—especially when a plan is put into action after a parent or step-parent’s death or disability.

Although these family dramas get in the way in many cases, there’s something you can do about it.

Having open family conversations about estate plans and wishes is the key. This can be hard because parents are afraid that sharing their wishes will cause conflict.

However, discussing your goals and how you’d like to share your wealth with your heirs, is only part of the story. You also have to update your documents to reflect your wishes. Review how your assets are titled and understand who is inheriting your wealth. From an estate planning perspective, you want to avoid probate and maintain control over the disbursement of your assets.

Probate is the process that states use to settle the estates of a deceased persons, who have not made arrangements to avoid probate. These proceedings are made a matter of public record, so there is no family privacy. It can also be expensive and time-consuming, and in some states can take a while, until beneficiaries get their shares.

Remember that retirement accounts like IRAs, 401(k)s and pension plans have named beneficiaries, so those assets pass directly outside of the probate process. The same is true for life insurance and annuities. These specific beneficiary designations—whether through “payable on death” or “transfer on death” accounts—will supersede any provisions in a will or trust. That’s why account holders and insurance policy owners should look at their beneficiary designations to be certain that the assets will transfer, according to their wishes.

Reference: CNBC (March 18, 2019) “This is the No. 1 issue keeping you from inheriting that windfall”