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Power of Attorney

The Second Most Powerful Estate Planning Document: Power of Attorney

The Second Most Powerful Estate Planning Document: Power of Attorney.  All too often, people wait until it’s too late to execute a power of attorney. It’s uncomfortable to think about giving someone full access to our finances, while we are still competent. However, a power of attorney can be created that is fully exercisable only when needed, according to a useful article “Power of attorney can be tailored to circumstances” from The News-Enterprise. Some estate planning attorneys believe that the power of attorney, or POA, is actually the second most important estate planning document after a will. Here’s what a POA can do for you.

The term POA is a reference to the document, but it also is used to refer to the person named as the agent in the document.

Generally speaking, any POA creates a fiduciary relationship, for either legal or financial purposes. A Medical or Healthcare POA creates a relationship for healthcare decisions. Sometimes these are for a specific purpose or for a specific period of time. However, a Durable POA is created to last until death or until it is revoked. It can be created to cover a wide array of needs.

Here’s the critical fact: a POA of any kind needs to be executed, that is, agreed to and signed by a person who is competent to make legal decisions. The problem occurs when family members or spouse do not realize they need a POA, until their loved one is not legally competent and does not understand what they are signing.

Incompetent or incapacitated individuals may not sign legal documents. Further, the law protects people from improperly signing, by requiring two witnesses to observe the individual signing.

The law does allow those with limited competency to sign estate planning documents, so long as they are in a moment of lucidity at the time of the signing. However, this is tricky and can be dangerous, as legal issues may be raised for all involved, if capacity is challenged later on.

If someone has become incompetent and has not executed a valid power of attorney, a loved one will need to apply for guardianship. This is a court process that is expensive, takes several months and leads to the court being involved in many aspects of the person’s life. The basics of this process: three professionals are needed to personally assess the “respondent,” the person who is said to be incompetent. The respondent loses all rights to make decisions of any kind for themselves. They also lose the right to vote.

A power of attorney can be executed quickly and does not require the person to lose any rights.

The biggest concern to executing a power of attorney, is that the person is giving an agent the control of their money and property. This is true, but the POA can be created so that it does not hand over this control immediately.

This is where the “springing” power of attorney comes in. Springing POA means that the document, while executed immediately, does not become effective for use by the agent, until a certain condition is met. The document can be written that the POA becomes in effect, if the person is deemed mentally incompetent by a doctor. The springing clause gives the agent the power to act if and when it is necessary for someone else to take over the individual’s affairs.

Having an estate planning attorney create the power of attorney that is best suited for each individual’s situation is the most sensible way to provide the protection of a POA, without worrying about giving up control while one is competent.

Reference: The News-Enterprise (Feb. 24, 2020) “Power of attorney can be tailored to circumstances”

Read More About this subject at:

9 Things You Need To Know About Power Of Attorney/Forbes

Power of Attorney/AmericanBarAssociation

Also read our previous Blogs at:

Why Do I Need a Power of Attorney?

C19 UPDATE: If You Have Not Yet Named Someone with Medical Power of Attorney, Do It Now

What is the Difference between Guardianship and Power of Attorney?

What is the Difference between Guardianship and Power of Attorney? Protecting yourself or a loved one can take many different forms, since aging takes a toll on the ability to handle financial and medical decisions. In most situations, guardianship or a power of attorney does the trick, says the article “Guardianships vs. Powers of Attorney” from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.  How to know which is the best one to use?

A guardianship is a court-authorized assignment of surrogate decision-making power for the benefit of a person who has lost the ability to make informed decisions on their own, often described as a person who has become incapacitated. The decisions that another person can make on their behalf can be very broad, or they can be very specific.

If a person becomes incapacitated, either through a slowly progressing illness like dementia or quickly, as the result of an accident, a judge will appoint a person or sometimes an organization to handle health care and financial decisions. The court-appointed guardian or organization could be a person or agency you have never heard of and would not know your family or anything about you.

Yes, that is scary. However, guardianship takes place when families do not plan in advance to appoint a surrogate decision maker, also known as an “agent.”

Here’s even more scary news: once the court has appointed a guardian, that relationship may continue for the rest of the incapacitated person’s life. That means annual accountings and involvement with the court, legal fees and other professional fees the guardian or court deems necessary.

There are some guardians who have made headlines for stealing money and making care decisions that the individual and their families did not want.

Meeting with an estate planning attorney to prepare for incapacity as part of an overall estate plan is a far better way. Why don’t more people do it?

  • They aren’t aware of the importance of power of attorney.
  • They don’t want to spend the money.
  • They don’t know who to choose as their power of attorney
  • They don’t want to think about incapacity or death.

In contrast to a court-supervised lifetime guardianship, a properly drafted power of attorney can provide for an agent to make a variety of financial and medical decisions. The person named as a power of attorney (the agent) can serve for the person’s lifetime, just like a guardian.

This is the most fundamental estate planning document, after the last will and testament. Once it’s prepared, you can always change your mind and you or your agent never need to go to court. Hopefully this shed some light  on what the difference between a Guardianship and a Power of Attorney is.

Reference: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Feb. 24, 2020) “Guardianships vs. Powers of Attorney”

Read other articles pertaining to this subject at : THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POWERS  OF ATTORNEY AND GUARDIANSHIPS/AARP

                                                                                                          Power of attorney and guardianship: What’s the difference?/care.com

You can also read some of our previous Blogs at :

Will Florida’s New Legislation Help Seniors in Guardianships?

When Do I Need a Power of Attorney?

Young Family

Estate Planning Is For Everyone

Estate planning is something anyone who is 18 years old or older needs to think about, advises the article “Estate planning for every stage of life from the Independent Record. It includes much more than a person’s last will and testament. It protects you from incapacity, provides the legal right to allow others to talk to your doctors if you can’t and takes care of your minor children, if an unexpected tragedy occurs. Let’s look at all the ages and stages where estate planning is needed.

Parents of young adults should discuss estate planning with their children. While parents devote decades to helping their children become independent adults, sometimes life doesn’t go the way you expect. A college freshman is more concerned with acing a class, joining a club and the most recent trend on social media. However, a parent needs to think about what happens when the child is over 18 and has a medical emergency. Parents have no legal rights to medical information, medical decision making or finances, once a child becomes a legal adult. Hospitals may not release private information and doctors can’t talk with parents, even in an extreme situation. Young adults need to have a HIPAA release, a durable power of medical attorney and a power of attorney for their finances created.

New parents also need estate planning. While it may be hard to consider while adjusting to having a new baby in the house, what would happen to that baby if something unexpected were to affect both parents? The estate planning attorney will create a last will and testament, which is used to name a guardian for any minor children, in case both parents pass. This also includes decisions that need to be made about the child’s education, medical treatment and even their social life. You’ll need to name someone to be the child’s guardian, and to be sure that they will raise your child the same way that you would.

An estate plan includes naming a conservator, who is a person with control over a minor child’s finances. You’ll want to name a responsible person who is trustworthy and good with handling money. It is possible to name the same person as guardian and conservator. However, it may be wise to separate the responsibilities.

An estate plan also ensures that your children receive their inheritance, when you think they will be responsible enough to handle it. If a minor child’s parents die and there is no  plan, the parent’s assets will be held by the court for the benefit of the child. Once the child turns 18, he or she will receive the entire amount in one lump sum. Few who are 18-years old are able to manage large sums of money. Estate planning helps you control how the money is distributed. This is also something to consider, when your children are the beneficiaries of any life insurance policies. An estate planning attorney can help you set up trusts, so the monies are distributed at the right time.

When people enter their ‘golden’ years—that is, they are almost retired—it is the time for estate plans to be reviewed. You may wish to name your children as power of attorney and medical power of attorney, rather than a sibling. It’s best to have people who will be younger than you for these roles as you age. This may also be the time to change how your wealth is distributed. Are your children old enough to be responsible with an inheritance? Do you want to create a legacy plan that includes charitable giving?

Lastly, update your estate plan any time there are changes in the family structure. Divorce, death, marriage or individuals with special needs all require a different approach to the basic estate plan. It’s a good idea to revisit an estate plan anytime there have been major changes in your relationships, to the law, or changes to your financial status.

Reference: Independent Record (March 1, 2020) “Estate planning for every stage of life

Read more relevant articles at:   ESTATE PLANNING IS FOR EVERYONE/globalwealthadvisors

You’re never too Young to Estate Plan

Also Read our previous gs at :  Creating an Estate Plan Should Be a New Year’s Resolution

                                                          Am I Too Young to Think About Estate Planning?

 

 

 

COVID 19 AND SMALL BUSINESSES

C19 UPDATE: Small Businesses Hurt by COVID-19 May Qualify for SBA Disaster Relief Loans

C19 UPDATE: Small Businesses Hurt by COVID-19 May Qualify for SBA Disaster Relief Loans.  It’s estimated that some 30 million US small businesses may fall victim to the coronavirus through closures, cancellations and other revenue losses. With no clear end in sight, the Small Business Administration (SBA) is offering eligible businesses low-interest disaster relief loans to cover operating expenses.

These loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that can’t be paid because of the disaster’s impact. The interest rate is 3.75% for small businesses. The interest rate for non-profits is 2.75%. In order to keep payments affordable, they are offering long-term repayments, up to a maximum of 30 years. Terms are determined on a case-by-case basis, based upon each borrower’s ability to repay.

The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering designated states and territories low-interest federal disaster loans for working capital to small businesses suffering substantial economic injury as a result of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). Upon a request received from a state’s or territory’s Governor, SBA will issue under its own authority, as provided by the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act that was recently signed by the President, an Economic Injury Disaster Loan declaration.

For more information on areas currently eligible for SBA disaster relief and to apply for a loan, visit the SBA website at https://www.sba.gov/disaster-assistance/coronavirus-covid-19 or call the SBA disaster assistance customer service center at 1-800-659-2955 (TTY: 1-800-877-8339) or e-mail  disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.

Resources: SBA Disaster Assistance in Response to the Coronavirus.

Read Related Articles at :

SBA to Provide Disaster Assistance Loans for Small Businesses Impacted by Coronavirus (COVID-19)

SBA Updates Criteria on States for Requesting Disaster Assistance Loans for Small Businesses Impacted by Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Also read one of our previous Blogs at:

C19 UPDATE: Paying for Covid-19 Testing and Treatment if You Have a High Deductible Insurance Plan

C19 UPDATE: Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now

Grandparents and Family

Can an Elder Law Attorney Help My Family?

Can an Elder Law Attorney Help My Family?  The right elder law attorney can counsel a family through the difficult details and requirements of the situations that may come up to protect the rights and welfare of seniors and their families. An elder law attorney may help with issues, such as guardianship, conservatorship, power of attorney, estate planning, Medicaid planning, probate and estate administration and advanced directives.

The Senior List’s recent article entitled “What is Elder Law and How Can an Elder Law Attorney Help Me?” explains that because the laws on the care of the elderly differ in each state, and are always subject to change, it is essential to find an elder law attorney who is skilled, knowledgeable and up-to-date on elder law policy and legal issues.

Before meeting with an elder law attorney, create a list of the specific concerns for the present and foreseeable future, so you know what qualifications and capabilities your attorney will need. You want a lawyer who’s experienced and educated, as well as comfortable to speak with and relatable.

You can ask these questions of your elder law attorney to help you make your decision:

  • How long have you been practicing in elder law?
  • Do you stay up to date on this area of law, by ongoing study and attending seminars on this subject matter?
  • Take a look at the required services we think will be needed. Can you fulfill them?
  • Do you have litigation experience?
  • What type of fee schedule do you offer?

If you’d like to try to stay up to date on what’s happening within elder law, go online and search for “aging and disability” as well as the name of the state in which the senior lives. Every state government has a department in charge of these matters (the official names will vary).

While caring for a love done can be stressful, understanding what options are available to them and to you, can make it all much easier. This is why it is good to know if  an Elder Law Attorney Can Help My Family?

Reference: The Senior List (Oct. 10, 2019) “What is Elder Law and How Can an Elder Law Attorney Help Me?”

Read More related to this topic at :    Why elder law is a growing, ‘anything-can-happen practice’

 What Does An Elder Law Attorney Do?

Also read some of our previous Blogs at:      When Do I Need an Elder Law Attorney?

 Caring for Your Aging Parents – An Elder Law Attorney’s Top 5 Questions and Answers

Ozzy and Sharon estate Plan

Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne Have an Estate Plan

Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne Have an Estate Plan.  Heavy metal rock star Ozzy Osbourne and his talk show host wife, Sharon Osbourne say that they have a plan to pass the lion’s share of their estate to their children.

Ozzy rose to fame during the 1970s as the lead vocalist of the heavy metal band Black Sabbath, and Sharon became a household name more recently, thanks to her role in the MTV reality show “The Osbournes” and her job as a daytime talk show host.

Sharon explained the couple’s plan on The Talk, while reacting to news that the late Kirk Douglas bequeathed most of his $80 million fortune to charity when he died in February 2020 at age 103, reports I Heart Radio’s recent article entitled “Ozzy, Sharon Osbourne’s Children Will Determine The Fate Of Their Fortune.”

“Everybody is different,” Sharon said. “And I just know that my husband’s body of work, that he’s written, and kept us all in the lifestyle that we love, goes to my children.”

The children will also be entrusted with determining what will happen to Ozzy’s image and likeness, Sharon also said.

“I don’t want someone that never met my husband owning his name and likeness and selling T-shirts everywhere and whatever. No, it stays in the Osbourne family.”

Ozzy’s latest solo album, Ordinary Man—which is his 12th overall—already ranks as his highest-charting solo debut ever in the United Kingdom.

Between Ozzy’s equity in Black Sabbath, the solo recordings that he and Sharon have worked so hard to control and the hours of television in which the two have starred, it’s not hard to see the fruits of the couple’s labor benefitting several future generations of Osbournes.

Estate planning is important in every field and for everyone. However, it’s particularly important in the entertainment business, where will contests and questions about inheritances frequently are publicized in the press. To that end, the estates of celebrated artists like Frank Zappa, Kurt Cobain, Prince, Tom Petty, Chris Cornell and many others have been the subject of public battles in recent years.

Even if you are not about to release your latest solo album, you still need to work with an experienced estate planning attorney to make certain that your plans for your assets and property are carried out after your death.  That probably is why Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne Have an Estate Plan.

Reference: I Heart Radio (March 2, 2020) “Ozzy, Sharon Osbourne’s Children Will Determine The Fate Of Their Fortune”

Read more about this at:    OZZY OSBOURNE Will Leave His ‘Body Of Work’ To His Children, Says SHARON OSBOURNE

Also this might be interesting :   15 Kids Who Won’t Inherit A Dime From Their Celeb Parents (And 5 Who Are Already Millionaires)

Read about other Celebrities and their Estate planning from one of our previous Blogs: The Latest on Kirk Douglas’ Estate

How Can Celebrities’ Estate Planning Be Impacted by Alzheimer’s?

COVID

C19 UPDATE: Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now

C19 UPDATE: Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now.

Though it may be hard not to panic when the grocery store shelves are empty, the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 keeps rising, and we see sobering statistics across the globe … we will not overcome this challenge with a panicked response.

Nonetheless, there are certain things we all need to be doing right now – and your public health officials are the best resource on how to stay personally safe and help prevent the virus from spreading. In fact, a March 16, 2020 Kiplinger article notes that the current crisis is serving as a wake-up call for many people to meet with their estate planning lawyer and get their estate plan in order.

When it comes to the seriousness of this outbreak, however, there also are some critical estate planning decisions you should make – or review – right now.

Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Who will make medical decisions for me should I become severely ill and unable to make these decisions myself?
  2. Who will make my financial decisions in that same situation — for example, who will be authorized to sign my income tax return, write checks or pay my bills online?
  3. Who is authorized to take care of my minor children in the event of my severe illness? What decisions are they authorized to make? How will they absorb the financial burden?
  4. If the unthinkable happens – what arrangements have I made for the care of my minor children, any family members with special needs, my pets or other vulnerable loved ones?
  5. How will my business continue if I were to become seriously ill and unable to work, even remotely … or in the event of my death?

These are the most personal decisions to make right now to protect yourself and your loved ones during this emergency. Now is also a good time to ask yourself if you have plans in place for the smooth transfer of your assets and preservation of your legacy.

We are ready to help walk you through these decisions, understand the ramifications of your choices, and memorialize your plans in binding legal documents. We are currently offering no-contact initial conferences remotely if you prefer. Book a call now and let us help you make the right choices for yourself and your loved ones. We can help you with Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now!

Check out these related articles:     

Trump declares coronavirus outbreak a national emergency/ Washingtonpost

Coronavirus Legal Advice: Get Your Business and Estate in Order Now

Also read one of our previous Blogs:         Health Crisis Strikes, Do you have a plan?

Princes brother

How Does the Death of Prince’s Brother Impact the Late Rock Star’s Estate?

How Does the Death of Prince’s Brother Impact the Late Rock Star’s Estate?  Alfred Jackson was one of six of Prince’s siblings who were heirs to their brother’s fortune worth at least $100 million. But they sold 90% of his estate rights last year to Primary Wave, a well-funded and growing entertainment company that invests in music publishing and recording rights. Prince’s sister Tyka Nelson also struck a deal with Primary Wave, and was given cash up front as the estate proceedings drag on.

The StarTribune’s recent article entitled “Death of Prince heir complicates estate settlement even more” reports that because of these moves, about a third of Prince’s assets could wind up being controlled by parties who were not related to him—which adds to the tough job of settling the late rock star’s estate.

Just a few hours after signing with Primary Wave in August of 2019, the sixty-six-year-old Jackson succumbed to heart disease, while at his home in Kansas City. However, unlike Prince, he had signed a will. Jackson did not have a wife or children. However, in another twist, rather than leaving his estate to his siblings, he bequeathed all his assets to a friend, Raffles Van Exel, who claims to be an entertainment consultant. However, he’s best known for hanging out with Whitney Houston in her final days, as well as Michael Jackson’s family. Exel was also a creative force behind O.J. Simpson’s notorious “If I Did It” book project.

Primary Wave’s deal with Jackson is being reviewed by his own family, at least his siblings who aren’t related to Prince. They aim to contest his will.

Prince’s accidental death by fentanyl in 2016 created one of the largest and most complicated probate court proceedings in Minnesota history. That’s because the rock star failed to draft a will. The value of his estate is somewhere between $100 million to $300 million estate and is comprised of potential music royalties.

Prince’s heirs are unable to get their money from his estate until it is settled. Because the probate proceedings are dragging on, Primary Wave offered Prince’s heirs the chance to raise cash by selling their estate rights. These heirs are all approaching 60Jackson wanted to enjoy life now, rather than wait for the process to be finalized. The siblings, by that time, may be too old, sick or dead to enjoy their inheritance.

Primary Wave tried to get at least three of Prince’s siblings — Sharon, Norrine, and John Nelson, to sell their estate rights. However, the three refused and said in a recent court filing that they are concerned that Primary Wave will use its deep pockets to their detriment. The company’s involvement would only lead to more delays and tensions, the siblings said in a letter directly to the probate judge. With the case draining their “limited resources,” the three explained that they are unable to pay legal counsel in this case and are representing themselves.

The terms of Primary Wave’s deals with Tyka Nelson and Alfred Jackson are private. However, the company has been asserting its rights in Prince’s probate case. A 2019 court filing said that the company says it “stands in the shoes” of the two heirs. That is How  the Death of Prince’s Brother Impacts the Late Rock Star’s Estate.

Reference: StarTribune (February 22, 2020) “Death of Prince heir complicates estate settlement even more”

Read more related articles at: 

Death of Prince heir complicates estate settlement even more

Prince’s Posthumous Year In Business Was Full Of Weirdos And Chaos

Read about other Celebrity Estate stories on one of our previous Blogs at:

Luke Perry’s Estate Planning – How Well Did He Do?

Why is Angelina Jolie Leaving Her Total Estate to Just One of Her Kids?

 

DIY Estate Planning

How Bad Can a Do-It-Yourself Estate Plan Be? Very!

How Bad Can a Do-It-Yourself Estate Plan Be? Very!  Here’s a real world example of why what seems like a good idea backfires, as reported in The National Law Review’s article “Unintended Consequences of a Do-It-Yourself Estate Plan.”

Mrs. Ann Aldrich wrote her own will, using a preprinted legal form. She listed her property, including account numbers for her financial accounts. She left each item of property to her sister, Mary Jane Eaton. If Mary Jane Eaton did not survive, then Mr. James Aldrich, Ann’s brother, was the designated beneficiary.

A few things that you don’t find on forms: wills and trusts need to contain a residuary, and other clauses so that assets are properly distributed. Ms. Aldrich, not being an experienced estate planning attorney, did not include such clauses. This one omission became a costly problem for her heir that led to litigation.

Mary Jane Eaton predeceased Ms. Aldrich. As Mary Jane Eaton had named Ms. Aldrich as her beneficiary, Ms. Aldrich then created a new account to receive her inheritance from Ms. Eaton. She also, as was appropriate, took title to Ms. Eaton’s real estate.

However, Ms. Aldrich never updated her will to include the new account and the new real estate property.

After Ms. Aldrich’s death, James Aldrich became enmeshed in litigation with two of Ms. Aldrich’s nieces over the assets that were not included in Ms. Aldrich’s will. The case went to court.

The Florida Supreme Court ruled that Ms. Aldrich’s will only addressed the property specifically listed to be distributed to Mr. James Aldrich. Those assets passed to Ms. Aldrich’s nieces.

Ms. Aldrich did not name those nieces anywhere in her will, and likely had no intention for them to receive any property. However, the intent could not be inferred by the court, which could only follow the will.

This is a real example of two basic problems that can result from do-it-yourself estate planning: unintended heirs and costly litigation.

More complex problems can arise when there are blended family or other family structure issues, incomplete tax planning or wills that are not prepared properly and that are deemed invalid by the court.

Even ‘simple’ estate plans that are not prepared by an estate planning lawyer can lead to unintended consequences. Not only was the cost of litigation far more than the cost of having an estate plan prepared, but the relationship between Ms. Aldrich’s brother and her nieces was likely damaged beyond repair.  that is how bad a Do-It-Yourself Estate Plan Be!

Reference: The National Law Review (Feb. 10, 2020) “Unintended Consequences of a Do-It-Yourself Estate Plan”

Read more about this at : Do it yourself Estate Planning by the American Bar Association

Is Do-it- yourself Estate Planning a Valid option? from Forbes

You can also read one of our previous Blogs at:  Do it yourself Wills go wrong- Fast

 

 

Kirk Douglas

The Latest on Kirk Douglas’ Estate

What is The Latest on Kirk Douglas’ Estate? Wealth Advisor’s recent article entitled “Kirk Douglas Lived Well, Died Rich And May Trigger $200M Los Angeles Range War” explains that Douglas worked steadily in a four-decade period but slowed down after the early 1980s. Since that’s almost 40 years ago, one might think that what would be considered a modest legacy by modern standards would be whittled down considerably. However, Kirk Douglas died extremely rich, despite a long life and decades of semi-retirement.

Douglas was one of the first to ask to participate in the profit of his movies and was one of the first stars to form his own production company. For example, Spartacus was big enough to gross $30 million on its $12 million budget. When he started his company, he refused to pay himself for that film. Instead he took 60% of the profit and wound up about $3 million ahead. His company owned the films and sold off distribution rights.

His widow Anne is now the only shareholder of record. She’s rolled the money into a family trust that over the decades created numerous tiers of holding companies and joint ventures. One of those joint ventures ended up owning half the land under Marina Del Rey’s high-rise Shores apartment complex, a property that cost a reported $165 million to build. The land is nearly priceless.

Now that it’s only Anne, the successor trustees will one day need to decide what to do with the land. She called the shots on the accounting side. Kirk remarked that he didn’t even know where the money was. However, when he found out, he got eager to give it all away. Tens of millions have already been committed to hospitals, schools and theaters.

Estate tax won’t be an issue because Kirk and Anne conducted thorough estate planning so that any wealth that goes to the family will transfer via a trust. That way, they’ll get a portion of the income without triggering estate tax concerns.

Thanks to all of Kirk’s films—many of which he owned like Spartacus—he compiled tens of millions of dollars in cash and stock during his lifetime. In almost 70 years of marital bliss, his planning added up to a lot of marital property. It was good life with good things yet to come.

It’s a testament to the power of long-term thinking. Kirk Douglas’ fortune has remained intact for generations and will undoubtedly keep helping the world for many years to come.

So that is the Latest on Kirk Douglas’ Estate.

Reference:  Wealth Advisor (Feb. 4, 2020) “Kirk Douglas Lived Well, Died Rich And May Trigger $200M Los Angeles Range War”

Read these articles for more information:    Kirk Douglas gives most of $61M fortune to charity, leaving nothing for son Michael

                                                                                             Kirk Douglas leaves most of his $80 million fortune to charity

Also read one of our previous Blogs about other celebrities who left their Estate’s to charity:

George Michael’s Charity Continues

If you are interested in leaving part of your Estate to charity, we also have experience in this area. Visit our Website at:

Charitable Planning In Northeast Florida

 

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