Can I Create a Power of Attorney without Giving Up Control?
Mother Happy Giving Power of Attorney to Daughter

Can I Create a Power of Attorney without Giving Up Control?

Seniors sometimes hesitate to sign off on a power of attorney that allows someone to act on their behalf, because they fear loss of control and exploitation. You do not have to lose control when giving a power of attorney to someone, says Daily Local News in the article “How to stay in control when appointing a power of attorney.” A power of attorney is a great tool to make sure someone is in place to make decisions for you when you can’t anymore.

On one hand, without having a signed power of attorney, which is relatively simple to obtain from an estate planning attorney, the family may be faced with going to court to file for guardianship.

Guardianship is expensive, time consuming, can limit the individual’s freedom and may even result in an appointment of someone the person does not want to be their guardian. There are some instances where guardianship is necessary.

On the other hand, the seniors who believe that a power of attorney is a powerful document that requires careful consideration, are right to give it the thoughtfulness this document deserves.

Here’s how to maintain some measure of control, while having a power of attorney:

Be certain about the agent you name. This is not a role for someone you recently met who feels like an old friend. It must be someone you would easily trust with your entire life savings, without a second thought. You need to be 100% sure that the person would act responsibly, in your best interests, following through in paying bills, consulting with experts when necessary, keeping records and being scrupulously honest and putting your interest first in everything they do.

Don’t name someone just because they are your oldest child and someone’s feelings would be hurt. If a person has money problems themselves, that person is not a good candidate for this role.

Have a backup. Or two. If your primary “attorney in fact” is unable or unwilling to act on your behalf, have a second person, or even a third, ready to act.

Ask your estate planning attorney to create documents that work for you. There are forms you can use, but they may not be appropriate for your situation. Your best bet is to have an attorney prepare a power of attorney document that meets your needs. For instance, you may not want to give someone unlimited power, or you may want to give them power to do everything but gift assets. You might want to give them the ability to cash in insurance policies for your medical expenses, but not to change the beneficiaries on your insurance policies.

If you want two agents to act together, you need to know whether your bank, brokerage house, financial institution or financial advisor will accept two. Will they be able to work together?

Separate financial power of attorney and health care power of attorney. One person does not need to handle all your tasks. One of your children may be great in crisis situations, while another is good at finances. Divide up the tasks, so that each can participate in decision making, in different areas.

Who needs to know about your power of attorney? It’s best if all your children know if one of them has been named attorney in fact and others have not. They will find out eventually, and it may be better, even if there is some grumbling, for them to know in advance of a crisis.

Fire at will. You retain the right to fire your agent(s), by serving them with a revocation or by appointing another attorney in fact. If the family is not getting along and things have turned ugly, speak with your estate planning attorney to ensure that the proper protections are in place.

Lastly, protect yourself by keeping access to debit cards, credit cards, usernames, passwords and online access to bank and investments carefully secure. If you run into a problem, don’t hide from it—get the help you need, either from a family member, trusted friend, or your estate planning attorney.

Read more how a power of attorney is a great tool to make sure someone is in place to make decisions for you when you can’t anymore.

Reference: Daily Local News (June 11, 2019) “How to stay in control when appointing a power of attorney”

Make Sure Your Power of Attorney Works When Needed
Daughter Helping Mom With Power of Attorney

Make Sure Your Power of Attorney Works When Needed

If you present a POA (Power of Attorney) to a bank and the agents are described as Bill and Samantha, for instance, instead of Samantha or Bill, the bank clerk may bristle. John as agent under power of attorney with Mary as successor agent is more likely to be acceptable. The use of the word “and” in a POA often presents a problem to banks. Did the document get drafted with the intent that Bill and Samantha both be present for any transactions? Having the right power of attorney is critical.

In Pennsylvania, major changes were made to the POA law in 2014 that addressed wording, witnessing and other requirements and protections for the party accepting the POA. The “Vine fix” law describes what a bank, financial institution or other party who is presented with a POA can and cannot do. The “Vine fix” provides immunity to anyone who accepts a POA in good faith, without actual knowledge that the POA is invalid, says The Mercury in the article “Planning Ahead: Will your bank honor your power of attorney?”

This law came about as a result of a case, Vine v. Commonwealth of PA State Employees’ Retirement Board. A Pennsylvania State employee, who was incapacitated following a car accident and a stroke, was given a POA to sign by the man who was then her husband. He changed her retirement options and later filed for divorce. At issue was the question of whether Mrs. Vine could invalidate his option and file for disability benefits. She did not have legal capacity, when she signed the document.

This was a case of hard facts making bad law. The State Supreme Court found that a third party (the Pennsylvania State Employees Retirement Board) could not rely on a void power of attorney, even where it did not know it was void when it was accepted. Banks saw the decision and were concerned that they could be sued for damages in similar cases.

The new law offers some immunity and additional protections for banks. However, as a result, there’s a little more push back with banks recognizing agents under power of attorney. The bank can request an agent’s certification or affidavit or opinion of counsel, as to whether the agent is acting within the scope of his legal authority. There is still a civil liability for refusing to accept a power of attorney that meets all the requirements.

Some estate planning attorneys have their clients obtain Power of Attorney forms directly from the institutions. This decreases the chances of any problems, when POAs are presented. It’s also a good idea to update the POA when you update your estate plan, which should be every three or four years. Regardless of your state of residence, a POA dated 10 or 15 years ago is likely to meet with some scrutiny. Talk with your estate planning attorney about the best way to address this in advance.

Learn what a good power of attorney can do for you.

Reference: The Mercury (April 2, 2019) “Planning Ahead: Will your bank honor your power of attorney?”

How Can a Power of Attorney Mistake Leave You Penniless?
Smiling woman avoids power of attorney mistakes

How Can a Power of Attorney Mistake Leave You Penniless?

Just before Dorothy Jorgensen’s husband died of cancer, he altered his power of attorney and designated one of his relatives. That relative used the power of attorney to withdraw everything but a few bucks, reports WPRI.com in the article “Son questions power of attorney after mother’s bank account is drained.”

“When I went to pick up a prescription for my mother, there was insufficient funds to pick up a prescription,” Dorothy’s son, Gene Weston, said. “I can’t believe that someone would do that to an elderly woman.”

The couple had been married for almost twenty years. Both had added money to the account.

“My mother is still alive, and my mother needs to continue living,” Weston said.

The son called the police, because he claims there’s no way the power of attorney document for his stepfather was legitimate.

“He was on morphine at the time,” Gene Weston said.

According to a local police report, detectives interviewed several people and found Jorgensen’s husband was “only taking a minimal dose of meds.”

Police determined that Mr. Jorgensen “acted with his own free will” and ended their criminal investigation.

However, these types of cases involving powers of attorney often wind up in civil court. When people make a change to a power of attorney right before their death, it can raise concerns, especially when the person is elderly and on medication.

One thing that many people don’t know, is that they can limit the legal document to protect a surviving spouse or family members.

It’s important to carefully choose an agent and make certain that the power of attorney is properly notarized. You should select a person whom you trust, and whom you know will do the right thing for you, in case you can’t make your own decisions.

The relative who withdrew the money from Jorgensen’s bank account was not willing to speak with a reporter. However, she said that she did nothing wrong. While this may be legally correct, clearly the amount of money taken by the relative that left the widow without any money, was not the right thing to do.

Call Legacy Planning Law Group in Jacksonville, Florida to learn more about how to avoid power of attorney mistakes.

Reference: WPRI 12 (April 15, 2019) “Son questions power of attorney after mother’s bank account is drained”