Legacy Planning Law Group
Weekly Blog

Estate & Elder Law

Protect Your Family. Preserve Your Legacy

If you’re interested in learning more about our process and the solution for you and your family, please book your free 15-minute call with us today!

Selling your Life Insurance Policy

Should I Sell My Life Insurance Policy?

Should I Sell My Life Insurance Policy?

It is quite common to buy life insurance. It may have been to protect your family financially or as a vehicle to provide liquidity for estate taxes. As we grow older and laws change, it is critical to determine if your policy has outlived its intended purpose. The traditional strategy of “buy and hold” no longer applies to the ever-changing world. Today, it may be a good idea to consider selling your policy.

Forbes’ recent article entitled “What You Should Know Before Selling Your Old Life Insurance Policy” explains that a lesser-known alternative to abandoning or surrendering a policy is known as a life settlement. This gives the policy owners the chance to get a much bigger cash lump sum, than what is provided by the life insurance carrier’s cash surrender value.

Life settlements are not new. Third-party institutional buyers have now started to acquire ownership of policies, in exchange for paying the owner a lump sum of cash. As a consequence, the policy owner no longer needs to make future premium payments.

The policy buyer then owns the life insurance policy and takes on the responsibility of future premium payments. They also get the full death benefit payable from the life insurance carrier when the insured dies.

Research shows that, on average, the most successful life settlement deals are with policies where the insured is age 65 or older. Those who are younger than 65 usually require a health impairment to receive a life settlement offer.

Knowing what your life insurance policy is worth is important, and its value is based on two primary factors: (i) the future projected premiums of the policy; and (ii) the insured’s current health condition.

Many policy owners don’t have the required experience with technical life expectancies, actuarial tables and medical knowledge to properly evaluate their life settlement value policies. This knowledge gap makes for an imbalance, since inexperienced policy owners may try to negotiate against experienced and sophisticated policy buyers trying to acquire the policy at the lowest possible cost.

To address this imbalance, the policy owner should seek help from an experienced estate planning attorney to help them with the process to sell the policy for the highest possible price.

If you have an old life insurance policy that’s collecting dust, ask an experienced estate planning attorney to review the policy’s importance and purpose in your portfolio. This may be the right time to turn that unneeded life insurance policy into cash.

Reference: Forbes (Jan. 26, 2021) “What You Should Know Before Selling Your Old Life Insurance Policy”

Read more related articles at:

5 Tips for Selling Your Life Insurance

Can you sell your life insurance policy?

Also, Read one of our previous Blogs at :

Is Life Insurance a Good Idea for My Estate Plan?

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

DEATH OF SPOUSE

How Do You Plan for the Death of a Spouse?

How Do You Plan for the Death of a Spouse?

The COVID pandemic has become a painful lesson in how important it is to having estate plans in order, especially when a spouse becomes sick, incapacitated, or dies unexpectedly. With more than 400,000 Americans dead from the coronavirus, not every one of them had an estate plan and a financial plan in place, leaving loved ones to make sense of their estate while grieving. This recent article from Market Watch titled “How to get your affairs in order if your spouse is dying” offers five things to do before the worst occurs.

Start by gathering information. Make all of your accounts known and put together paperwork about each and every account. Look for documents that will become crucial, including a durable power of attorney, an advanced health care directive and a last will. Gather paperwork for life insurance policies, investment portfolios and retirement accounts. Create a list of contact information for your estate planning attorney, accountant, insurance agent, doctors and financial advisors and share it with the people who will be responsible for managing your life. In addition, call these people, so they have as much information as possible—this could make things easier for a surviving spouse. Consider making introductions, via phone or a video call, especially if you have been the key point person for these matters.

Create a hard copy binder for all of this information or a file, so your loved ones do not have to conduct a scavenger hunt.

If there is an estate plan in place, discuss it with your spouse and family members so everyone is clear about what is going to happen. If your estate plan has not been updated in several years, that needs to be done. There have been many big changes to tax law, and you may be missing important opportunities that will benefit those left behind.

If there is no estate plan, something is better than nothing. A trust can be done to transfer assets, as long as the trust is funded properly and promptly.

Confirm beneficiary designations. Check everything for accuracy. If ex-spouses, girlfriends, or boyfriends are named on accounts that have not been reviewed for decades, there will be a problem for the family. Problems also arise when no one is listed as a beneficiary. Beneficiary designations are used in many different accounts, including retirement accounts, life insurance policies, annuities, stock options, restricted stock and deferred compensation plans.

Many Americans die without a will, known as “intestate.” With no will, the court must rely on the state’s estate laws, which does not always result in the people you wanted receiving your property. Any immediate family or next of kin may become heirs, even if they were people you with whom you were not close or from whom you may even have been estranged. Having no will can lead to estate battles or having strangers claim part of your estate.

If there are minor children and no will to declare who their guardian should be, the court will decide that also. If you have minor children, you must have a will to protect them and a plan for their financial support.

Create a master list of digital assets. These assets range from photographs to financial accounts, utility bills and phone bills to URLs for websites. What would happen to your social media accounts, if you died and no one could access them? Some platforms provide for a legacy contact, but many do not. Prepare what information you can to avoid the loss of digital assets that have financial and sentimental value.

Gathering these materials and having these conversations is difficult, but they are a necessity if a family member receives a serious diagnosis. If there is no estate plan in place, have a conversation with an estate planning attorney who can advise what can be done, even in a limited amount of time.

Reference: Market Watch (Jan. 22, 2021) “How to get your affairs in order if your spouse is dying”

Read more related articles here:

‘When life goes sideways’ – how to prepare for the death of a spouse

Death Of A Spouse Planning Tips

Also, read one of our previous blogs here:

What Do I Need to Do after the Death of My Spouse?

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

Spouse dying in hospital

Get Estate Plan in Order, If Spouse Is Dying from a Terminal Illness

Get Estate Plan in Order, If Spouse Is Dying from a Terminal Illness

Thousands of people are still dying from COVID-19 complications every day, and others are dealing with life-threatening illnesses like cancer, heart attack and stroke. If your spouse is ill, the pain is intensified by the anticipated loss of your life partner.

Wealth Advisor’s recent article entitled “Your Spouse Is Dying: 5 Ways To Get Your Estate In Order Now,” says that it’s frequently the attending physician who suggests that your spouse get his affairs in order.

Your spouse’s current prognosis and whether he or she’s at home or in a hospital will determine whether updates can be made to your estate plan. If it has been some time since the two of you last updated your estate plan, you should review the planning with your elder law attorney or estate planning attorney to be certain that you understand it and to see if there are any changes that can and should be made. There are five issues on which to focus your attention:

A Fiduciary Review. See who’s named in your estate planning documents to serve as executor and trustee of your spouse’s estate. They will have important roles after your spouse dies. Be sure you are comfortable with the selected fiduciaries, and they’re still a good fit. If your spouse has been sick, you’ve likely reviewed his or her health care proxy and power of attorney. If not, see who’s named in those documents as well.

An Asset Analysis. Determine the effect on your assets when your partner dies. Get an updated list of all your assets and see if there are assets that are held jointly which will automatically pass to you on your spouse’s death or if there are assets in your spouse’s name alone with no transfer on death beneficiary provided. See if any assets have been transferred to a trust. These answers will determine how easily you can access the assets after your spouse’s passing.

A Trust Assessment. Any assets that are currently in a trust or will pass into a trust at death will be controlled by the trust document. See who the beneficiaries are, how distributions are made and who will control the assets.

Probate Prep. If there’s property solely in your spouse’s name with no transfer on death beneficiary, those assets will pass according to his or her will. Review the will to make sure you understand it and whether probate will be needed to settle the estate.

Beneficiary Designation Check. Make certain that beneficiaries of your retirement accounts and life insurance policies are current.

If changes need to be made, an experienced elder law or estate planning attorney can counsel you on how to best do this.

Reference: Wealth Advisor (Jan. 26, 2021) “Your Spouse Is Dying: 5 Ways To Get Your Estate In Order Now”

Read more related articles at:

How to get your affairs in order if your spouse is dying

Planning During Terminal Illness

Caring for someone with a terminal illness: Planning for deterioration and death

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

Surviving Spouse Needs An Estate Plan

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

 

 

Scariest issues of Retirement

What are the Scariest Statistics for Retirement?

What are the Scariest Statistics for Retirement?

Think Advisor’s recent article entitled “11 Scariest Retirement Statistics: 2020” says that there is a lack of preparation, savings difficulty and general uncertainty that American retirees are facing. Here are those scary stats:

  1. Just a quarter of Americans are on a trajectory to maintain their lifestyles in retirement. The other 75% will need to work longer, move to lower-cost housing and cut spending to maintain their standard of living, largely due to the coronavirus downturn.
  2. The Social Security trust funds would be empty by 2023, without the payroll tax. While President Trump let employers temporarily defer the employee portion of payroll taxes, he said the deferred taxes could later be forgiven, or the cut made permanent. When he signed the order, he vowed to “terminate the tax,” if reelected. Republican lawmakers subsequently debuted a plan to fund any shortfalls from the Treasury.
  3. Social Security benefits will be decreased by 21% if the trust fund runs out. Congress will have to intercede, or it could happen 10 years from now, if not sooner.
  4. Those born in 1960 will have a big problem because of the complicated formula the Social Security Administration uses to calculate benefits. Pre-retirees born in 1960 will see a nearly 15% cut to their lifetime benefits from Social Security when it’s time to collect. If the pandemic suppresses the economy into 2022, those cuts will impact more pre-retirees. The impact to their Social Security benefits will also be permanent.
  5. The 2021 Social Security cost of living adjustment, or COLA, will be just 1.3%. Retirees should note that rising health care costs and a potential 6% increase in Medicare Part B premiums may absorb that benefit increase.
  6. More than 50% of Americans think the economy is worse now than in 2008, with 51% of Americans seeing the COVID slowdown as worse than the 2008 recession. A survey from Edelman Financial Engines also found that 26% had withdrawn money from retirement or savings for living expenses.
  7. About 60% of retirement savers have fallen behind, according to a TIAA study. Among these, 30% said it was directly due to the pandemic.
  8. Internet searches for “move out of the U.S.” have increased 16 times. International Living magazine says it had seen the jump in search traffic around the phrase since May. A total of 20% of respondents in a survey it conducted also said they wanted to move due to the pandemic. However, just 45% cited a desire to save money.
  9. Approximately 42% of investors sold stock, and most of them (88%) of them regretted it. In response to the drop in stocks in mid-March last year, 42% of investors in a survey by MagnifyMoney sold at least one stock and 24% sold all their holdings. About 69% of those who sold stock at the start of the pandemic greatly regretted it, and 19% said they were somewhat regretful.
  10. Roughly 80% of older Americans don’t understand retirement planning and don’t know the basics of how to successfully plan for a financially secure retirement, according to a study by The American College of Financial Services. The survey also found only 30% of respondents had a plan in place to fund long-term care needs, and just one in four actually had long-term care insurance.
  11. About 3 million workers may have been driven into early retirement due to the pandemic. From March to August of 2020, 2.8 million older workers might have been pushed out of their jobs prematurely, with economic turmoil and poor health making it hard for them to resume their careers elsewhere, according to by the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis at the New School. The report found that 38% of unemployed older adults stopped looking for work and left the workforce, and an additional 1.1 million were expected to do likewise.

Reference: Think Advisor (Oct. 30, 2020) “11 Scariest Retirement Statistics: 2020”

Read more related articles at:

Scary Statistics on Retirement Readiness

15 Scary Retirement Statistics

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

How Do I Include Retirement Accounts in Estate Planning?

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

Corona 3

Did the Pandemic Put a Premium on Estate Planning?

Did the Pandemic Put a Premium on Estate Planning?

The number of life insurance applications from people under age 44 increased by more than 7% in 2020, according to the MIB Group, a data sharing service for insurance companies, which tracks life insurance applications.

NBC News’ recent article entitled “Americans flocked to buy life insurance, prepare wills and trusts last year” says that life insurance applications for the age group had been mostly down over the last several years. So, that’s a big increase.

There are a number of factors that contributed to the spike, but experts point to the pandemic and the insurance awareness it brought on.

People are looking at mortality like they’ve never looked at it before, especially younger adults. Those who felt invincible have been shaken by COVID-19. They now realize we are all mortal.

With millions of jobs lost during the early stages of the pandemic, many workers had to leave behind their employer-paid life insurance through their employee health benefits packages. Roughly 54% of Americans had life insurance earlier this year, most of them through their employers.

Overall, insurance applications are up by 4% this year. Northwestern Mutual, the nation’s largest seller of life insurance last year, sold 15% more life insurance policies from April to September, compared to the same time last year, CNBC reported in October.

Other companies also saw their applications grow.

In estate planning, the number of people drafting wills and trusts is also on the upswing because of the pandemic. A recent LegalZoom survey found that 32% of people ages 18 to 34 drafted wills because of COVID-19, and about 21% of that group did so because they knew someone who had contracted the virus.

Estate planning attorneys know that preparing for death can be cumbersome. However, as the pandemic has shown us, our demise can come at any time. We should all be prepared.

Reference: NBC News (Jan. 1, 2021) “Americans flocked to buy life insurance, prepare wills and trusts last year”

Read more related articles at:

Pandemic highlights importance of estate planning

Estate Planning In The Pandemic Age: It’s Time To Prepare For The Unexpected

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

How Can Estate Planning Protect Me from COVID-19?

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

Estate Planning

Do We Need Estate Planning?

Do We Need Estate Planning?

Estate planning also referred to as an EP, is not just about making a will, nor is it just for people who live in mansions. It is best described in the title of this article “Estate planning is an important strategy for arranging financial affairs and protecting heirs—here are five reasons why everyone needs an estate plan” from Business Insider. Estate planning is a plan for the future, for you, your spouse and those you love.

There are a number of reasons for estate planning:

  • Avoiding paying more federal and state taxes than necessary
  • Ensuring that assets are distributed as you want
  • Naming the people you choose for your own care, if you become incapacitated; and/or
  • Naming the people you choose to care for your minor children, if you and your spouse left them orphaned.

If that sounds like a lot to accomplish, it is. However, with the help of a trusted estate planning attorney, an EP can provide you with the peace of mind that comes with having all of the above.

If those decisions and designations are not made by you while you are alive and legally competent, the state law and the courts will determine who will get your assets, raise your children and how much your estate will pay in death taxes to state and federal governments. You can avoid that with an EP.

Here are the five key things about estate planning:

It’s more than a will.  It includes creating Durable Powers of Attorney to appoint individuals who will make medical and/or financial decisions, if you are not able to do so. The estate plan also contains Medical Directives to communicate your wishes about what kind of care you do or do not want, if you are so sick you cannot do so for yourself. The estate plan is where you can create Trusts to control how property passes from one person or one generation to the next.

Estate planning saves time, money, and angst. If you have a surviving spouse, they are usually the ones who serve as your executor. However, if you do not and if you do not have an estate plan, the court names a public administrator to distribute assets according to state law. While this is happening, no one can access your assets. There’s a lot of paperwork and a lot of legal fees. With a will, you name an executor who will take care of and gain access to most, if not all, of your assets and administer them according to your instructions.

Estate planning includes being sure that investment and retirement accounts with a beneficiary designation have been completed. If you don’t name a beneficiary, the asset goes through the probate court. If you fail to update your beneficiary designations, your ex or a person from your past may end up with your biggest assets.

Estate planning is also tax planning. While federal taxes only impact the very wealthy right now, that is likely to change in the future. States also have estate taxes and inheritance taxes of their own, at considerably lower exemption levels than federal taxes. If you wish your heirs to receive more of your money than the government, tax planning should be part of your estate plan.

The estate plan is also used to protect minor children. No one expects to die prematurely, and no one expects that two spouses with young children will die. However, it does happen, and if there is no will in place, then the court makes all the decisions: who will raise your children, and where, how their upbringing will be financed, or, if there are no available family members, if the children should become wards of the state and enter the foster care system. That’s probably not what you want.

The estate plan includes the identification of the person(s) you want to raise your children, and who will be in charge of the assets left in trust for the children, like proceeds from a life insurance policy. This can be the same person, but often the financial and child-rearing roles are divided between two trustworthy people. Naming an alternate for each position is also a good idea, just in case the primary people cannot serve.

Estate planning, finally, also takes care of you while you are living, with a power of attorney and healthcare proxy. That way someone you know, and trust can step in, if you are unable to take care of your legal and financial affairs.

Once your  plan is in place, remember that it is like your home: it needs to be updated every three or four years, or when there are big changes to tax law or in your life.

Reference: Business Insider (Jan. 14, 2021) “Estate planning is an important strategy for arranging financial affairs and protecting heirs—here are five reasons why everyone needs an estate plan”

Read more related articles at:

Do you need an estate plan?

5 Reasons You Need an Estate Plan

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

What Kind of Estate Planning Do I Need During the Pandemic?

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

How to Help your Parents Retire

Have Your Parents Planned Carefully for Retirement?

Have Your Parents Planned Carefully for Retirement?

The self-employed are not alone. In fact, this lack of retirement planning is a crisis that most Americans are facing. The Fed’s 2018 Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households found that 25% of U.S. adults have no retirement savings. In addition, just 36% percent of non-retired adults say their retirement savings are on track. With this in mind, Nasdaq’s recent article asks “Do Your Parents Know How to Plan Retirement?”

It might, therefore, be time to ask your parents if they have a plan for their retirement. The faster you know about this, the sooner you can address this problem, so they can actually enjoy their Golden Years without burdening your family.

First, remember that Social Security is expected to be depleted by 2035, so that may need to be part of the planning. Social Security also only provides a similar standard of living for those in the lowest quartile of income earners in the U.S. Thus, unless their household is earning less than $30,000 a year, your parents will need to look to personal savings to keep their current standard of living in retirement.

Added to this is the fact that Medicare won’t cover assisted living, so that’s another topic in your discussion about your parents’ retirement. Here is a list of questions you might want your parents to answer:

  • What are your retirement plans and are you on the right path?
  • What are your sources of retirement income?
  • Do you have debt?
  • What insurance do you have (life, long-term care, Medicare)?
  • If you were unable to live in your current location, where would you want to live?

You should also talk to your siblings and spouse, so everyone is on the same page. Then, ask your parents if they’d be willing to share documents, like bank accounts, wills and trusts. Other information includes the following:

  • Health and long-term care insurance policies
  • Investments, pensions and details on Social Security
  • Estate planning documents, such as a durable power of attorney, a health care proxy and a living will; and
  • Mortgage and other outstanding debts.

With this information, you can help them create a budget to maximize their savings for retirement.

As you are helping your parents, be sure you are not putting your own retirement in jeopardy. Take care of your priorities and build your own savings. Then, if you’re comfortable and have the means, you can assist them financially.

Reference: Nasdaq (Dec. 29, 2020) “Do Your Parents Know How to Plan Retirement?”

Read more related articles at:

Six Steps to Having a Retirement Conversation with Parents

Retirement: How to preserve it while helping your parents

How to Help Your Parents Retire Without Derailing Your Own Retirement

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

Retirement Planning and Declining Abilities

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

Estate Planning Terms

What Key Estate Planning Terms Should I Know?

What Key Estate Planning Terms Should I Know?

Estate planning can help you accomplish several objectives, including naming guardians for minor children, choosing healthcare agents to make decisions for you should you become ill, minimizing taxes so you can give more wealth to your heirs and saying how and to whom you would like to pass your estate at death.

Emmett Messenger Index’s recent article entitled “13 Estate Planning Terms You Need to Know” provides some important terms to understand as you consider your own estate plan.

Assets: This is anything a person owns. It can include a home and other real estate, bank accounts, life insurance, investments, furniture, jewelry, collectibles, art, and clothing.

Beneficiary: This is an individual or entity (like a charity) that gets a beneficial interest in an asset, such as an estate, trust, account, or insurance policy.

Distribution: A payment in cash or asset(s) to the beneficiary who’s designated to receive it.

Estate: All of the assets and debts left by a person at death.

Fiduciary: An individual with a legal obligation or duty to act primarily for another person’s benefit, such as a trustee or agent under a power of attorney.

Funding: The process of transferring or retitling assets to a trust. Note that a living trust will only avoid probate at the trustmaker’s death if it’s fully funded. A trustmaker also may be known as a grantor, settlor, or trustor.

Incapacitated or Incompetent: The situation when a person is unable to manage her own affairs, either temporarily or permanently, and often involves a lack of mental capacity.

Inheritance: These are assets received from someone who has died.

Probate: This is the orderly court-supervised process of distributing the assets of a person who has died.

Trust: This is a fiduciary relationship where a trustmaker gives a trustee the right to hold property or assets for the benefit of another party, known as the beneficiary. The trust is a written trust agreement that directs how the trust assets will be distributed to the beneficiary.

Will: A written document with directions for disposing of a person’s assets after their death. A will is enforced by a probate court. A will can provide for the nomination of a guardian for minor children.

Reference: Emmett Messenger Index (Oct. 28, 2020) “13 Estate Planning Terms You Need to Know”

Read more related articles at:

Estate Planning Glossary

Glossary of Estate Planning Terms ABA

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

Estate Planning Is a Gift and a Legacy for Loved Ones

Click here to check out our Master Class!

Retirement Planning

Why Planning Tasks Don’t Stop Because You’ve Retired

Why Planning Tasks Don’t Stop Because You’ve Retired

How you handle money and legal matters during retirement is more important than during your working years. It’s harder to bounce back from financial setbacks when you aren’t getting a regular paycheck. Managing finances and legal affairs to keep your savings intact and your estate plan current is part of your new responsibility as a retiree, says a recent article “7 Money Moves You Should Make After Retiring” from MoneyTalksNews.

  1. Review estate planning documents. One of the most important documents is your will, but you also need to review any power of attorney and trust documents. A will is used to specify what you want done with your property after you die. What happens if you die without a will? The state will step in and make those decisions for you.

If you marry, divorce, inherit or buy property, you should update your will to reflect your changed circumstances. The arrival of a new grandchild may make you want to change your beneficiaries.

Reviewing your will after retirement and then periodically afterwards can put your mind at ease. If you don’t have a will, now is the time to have one created with an experienced estate planning attorney. You may also need a living will, power of attorney and letter of intent.

  1. Review named beneficiaries. Beneficiary designations require updating anytime there is a change in your life. When you purchase life insurance, enroll in a pension plan or open an individual retirement account, you are often asked to name a beneficiary–the person who will inherit the proceeds when you die. These instructions take precedence over instructions in a will.
  2. Prepare for your funeral. No one wants to consider their own mortality, but helping your loved ones be financially prepared for your funeral is a gift. By planning your own funeral, including making arrangements for funds to be available to pay for it, you save your family of the burden of having to plan and pay for a funeral while they are grieving your loss. Planning in advance also gives you an opportunity to decide what type of funeral you want.
  3. Consider trimming transportation costs. If your household has two cars, but you could manage with one, consider paring down this expense. Seniors tend to pay higher rates than young people, so this is one way to trim your monthly expenses.
  4. Review emergency fund status. Having money set aside for unexpected expenses is more important now than when you were working. An emergency fund can help you avoid taking money out of retirement accounts, which costs you not only the funds themselves, but the potential growth of the funds and any taxes that might be due on withdrawals.
  5. Plan for Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) and taxes. Once you celebrate your 72nd birthday, you’ll need to start taking RMDs from tax-deferred retirement accounts. If you miss an RMD deadline or don’t take out enough, you may have to pay a 50% tax penalty on the amount of money you did not withdraw. RMDs are treated as taxable income, so they may impact your federal income tax rate, as well as the “combined income” formula used to determine the extent to which your Social Security benefits are taxable.
  6. Do you still need life insurance? If your family is not dependent upon your income, now might be the time to drop life insurance policies. The main purpose of life insurance is to provide an income stream for loved ones, if you should die unexpectedly when you are working and raising a family. However, if you are retired, your children are grown and your spouse is not relying on your income, it may be time to let the policies lapse. On the other hand, if you can afford the premiums and wish to leave the proceeds to a spouse or your children, by all means keep the policy. However, check the beneficiary designation.

Reference: MoneyTalksNews (Oct. 9, 2020) “7 Money Moves You Should Make After Retiring”

Read more related articles at:

Retirement Planning Doesn’t Stop When You Retire-Investopedia

Retirement Planning Doesn’t Stop When You Retire-Forbes

16 Retirement Mistakes You Will Regret Forever-Kiplinger

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

How Do I Include Retirement Accounts in Estate Planning?

Click here to check out our Master Class!

Join Our eNews