Legacy Planning Law Group
Weekly Blog

Estate & Elder Law

Protect Your Family. Preserve Your Legacy

If you’re interested in learning more about our process and the solution for you and your family, please book your free 15-minute call with us today!

Amanda Bynes

How Does Former Nickelodeon Star Amanda Bynes Pregnancy Impact Her Conservatorship?

Amanda Bynes, a former Nickelodeon star, went on her Instagram account to share an ultrasound photo and wrote “Baby on Board.”

Her fiancé, Paul Michael, also shared a photo on his account, writing “baby in the making.” However, both of these posts were deleted almost immediately and neither of the two has mentioned anything since. In addition, Amanda is reportedly seeking mental health treatment.

Amanda has been under conservatorship since 2014.

However, she recently went to court to discuss some of the terms of her conservatorship. After the hearing, she reportedly was to check in to a facility voluntarily. Her attorney released a statement and asked for the actress’s privacy, so that she could focus on “getting better.”

Amanda, her parents, and her fiancé Paul Michael, will all share physical custody of the baby. However, because of the conservatorship, only her parents and Paul will be able to make legal decisions for the baby. This would be a “best case scenario” for Amanda.

On the other hand, the worst case is that county social workers get involved and try to remove the baby, because they believe Amanda isn’t a fit parent.

As far as Amanda’s recent news that she’s engaged to Michael, the conservatorship would stipulate that her mother would have the final say as to whether or not the She’s the Man star could say “I do.”

If Amanda’s parents didn’t approve the marriage, they have the authority as her conservators to petition the court to annul the marriage, on the basis of their daughter’s “unsound mind.”

Although Amanda hasn’t said anything publicly about the alleged pregnancy, her lawyer David Esquibias spoke to TMZ and said that he would “not confirm” the supposed pregnancy.

“Because of that it’s premature for anyone to speculate about who would have custody of Amanda’s unborn child,” he said.

Amanda announced her engagement on Valentine’s Day. She teased fans with a photo of her engagement ring but didn’t divulge any details of her relationship.

Then, a few days later, she introduced her followers to Paul Michael. The couple reportedly briefly broke up, but Paul said that their social media accounts were hacked.

Reference: Inquisitr (March 25, 2020) “Amanda Bynes Reportedly Pregnant, Conservatorship Could Impact Custody Of Her Baby”

Read more related article at :

Amanda Bynes Reportedly Pregnant, Conservatorship Could Impact Custody Of Her Baby

Amanda Bynes’ Mom ‘Furious’ About the Star’s Pregnancy Amid Conservatorship

Also read another article about celebrities and conservatorships in one of our previous Blogs at:

What’s the Latest on Britney Spears’ Conservatorship?

 

in home care giving

C19 UPDATE: CDC Recommends Care Plans for Both Older Adults and Caregivers

C19 UPDATE: CDC Recommends Care Plans for Both Older Adults and Caregivers

Quick. You or your senior loved one is running a fever, coughing and struggling to breathe. You suspect COVID-19 and a full-blown medical emergency starts to unfold. Medical professionals will need to quickly know the patient’s health conditions, medications, healthcare providers and emergency contacts. The CDC Recommends care plans for both older adults and Caregivers.

Are you ready?

The Centers for Disease (CDC) recommends developing a Care Plan now as part of your emergency preparedness.

What is a Care Plan?

A care plan is a document that summarizes a person’s health conditions and current treatments for their care. The CDC offers a handy form you can use, Complete Care Plan. This is a fill-able form you can complete on your computer or print and complete by hand.

How Do You Develop a Care Plan?

The CDC offers these tips

  • Start a conversation about care planning with the person you take care of.
  • Talk to the doctor of the person you care for or another health care provider.
  • Ask about what care options are relevant to the person you care for.
  • Discuss any needs you have as a caregiver.

And remember, care plans can reduce emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and improve overall medical management, especially during a medical emergency. This is what the CDC Recommends about Care Plans for Both Older Adults and Caregivers

Resource: Centers for Disease Control, Coronavirus Disease 2019, https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/older-adults.html

Read more related articles at:

Caregiving for Family and Friends — A Public Health Issue

Care Plans Help Both Older Adults and Caregivers

Also read one of our previous Blogs at:

How Your Caregiver Can Get Paid and Treated Fairly

What is the Difference between Guardianship and Power of Attorney?

What is the Difference between Guardianship and Power of Attorney? Protecting yourself or a loved one can take many different forms, since aging takes a toll on the ability to handle financial and medical decisions. In most situations, guardianship or a power of attorney does the trick, says the article “Guardianships vs. Powers of Attorney” from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.  How to know which is the best one to use?

A guardianship is a court-authorized assignment of surrogate decision-making power for the benefit of a person who has lost the ability to make informed decisions on their own, often described as a person who has become incapacitated. The decisions that another person can make on their behalf can be very broad, or they can be very specific.

If a person becomes incapacitated, either through a slowly progressing illness like dementia or quickly, as the result of an accident, a judge will appoint a person or sometimes an organization to handle health care and financial decisions. The court-appointed guardian or organization could be a person or agency you have never heard of and would not know your family or anything about you.

Yes, that is scary. However, guardianship takes place when families do not plan in advance to appoint a surrogate decision maker, also known as an “agent.”

Here’s even more scary news: once the court has appointed a guardian, that relationship may continue for the rest of the incapacitated person’s life. That means annual accountings and involvement with the court, legal fees and other professional fees the guardian or court deems necessary.

There are some guardians who have made headlines for stealing money and making care decisions that the individual and their families did not want.

Meeting with an estate planning attorney to prepare for incapacity as part of an overall estate plan is a far better way. Why don’t more people do it?

  • They aren’t aware of the importance of power of attorney.
  • They don’t want to spend the money.
  • They don’t know who to choose as their power of attorney
  • They don’t want to think about incapacity or death.

In contrast to a court-supervised lifetime guardianship, a properly drafted power of attorney can provide for an agent to make a variety of financial and medical decisions. The person named as a power of attorney (the agent) can serve for the person’s lifetime, just like a guardian.

This is the most fundamental estate planning document, after the last will and testament. Once it’s prepared, you can always change your mind and you or your agent never need to go to court. Hopefully this shed some light  on what the difference between a Guardianship and a Power of Attorney is.

Reference: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Feb. 24, 2020) “Guardianships vs. Powers of Attorney”

Read other articles pertaining to this subject at : THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POWERS  OF ATTORNEY AND GUARDIANSHIPS/AARP

                                                                                                          Power of attorney and guardianship: What’s the difference?/care.com

You can also read some of our previous Blogs at :

Will Florida’s New Legislation Help Seniors in Guardianships?

When Do I Need a Power of Attorney?

Young Family

Estate Planning Is For Everyone

Estate planning is something anyone who is 18 years old or older needs to think about, advises the article “Estate planning for every stage of life from the Independent Record. It includes much more than a person’s last will and testament. It protects you from incapacity, provides the legal right to allow others to talk to your doctors if you can’t and takes care of your minor children, if an unexpected tragedy occurs. Let’s look at all the ages and stages where estate planning is needed.

Parents of young adults should discuss estate planning with their children. While parents devote decades to helping their children become independent adults, sometimes life doesn’t go the way you expect. A college freshman is more concerned with acing a class, joining a club and the most recent trend on social media. However, a parent needs to think about what happens when the child is over 18 and has a medical emergency. Parents have no legal rights to medical information, medical decision making or finances, once a child becomes a legal adult. Hospitals may not release private information and doctors can’t talk with parents, even in an extreme situation. Young adults need to have a HIPAA release, a durable power of medical attorney and a power of attorney for their finances created.

New parents also need estate planning. While it may be hard to consider while adjusting to having a new baby in the house, what would happen to that baby if something unexpected were to affect both parents? The estate planning attorney will create a last will and testament, which is used to name a guardian for any minor children, in case both parents pass. This also includes decisions that need to be made about the child’s education, medical treatment and even their social life. You’ll need to name someone to be the child’s guardian, and to be sure that they will raise your child the same way that you would.

An estate plan includes naming a conservator, who is a person with control over a minor child’s finances. You’ll want to name a responsible person who is trustworthy and good with handling money. It is possible to name the same person as guardian and conservator. However, it may be wise to separate the responsibilities.

An estate plan also ensures that your children receive their inheritance, when you think they will be responsible enough to handle it. If a minor child’s parents die and there is no  plan, the parent’s assets will be held by the court for the benefit of the child. Once the child turns 18, he or she will receive the entire amount in one lump sum. Few who are 18-years old are able to manage large sums of money. Estate planning helps you control how the money is distributed. This is also something to consider, when your children are the beneficiaries of any life insurance policies. An estate planning attorney can help you set up trusts, so the monies are distributed at the right time.

When people enter their ‘golden’ years—that is, they are almost retired—it is the time for estate plans to be reviewed. You may wish to name your children as power of attorney and medical power of attorney, rather than a sibling. It’s best to have people who will be younger than you for these roles as you age. This may also be the time to change how your wealth is distributed. Are your children old enough to be responsible with an inheritance? Do you want to create a legacy plan that includes charitable giving?

Lastly, update your estate plan any time there are changes in the family structure. Divorce, death, marriage or individuals with special needs all require a different approach to the basic estate plan. It’s a good idea to revisit an estate plan anytime there have been major changes in your relationships, to the law, or changes to your financial status.

Reference: Independent Record (March 1, 2020) “Estate planning for every stage of life

Read more relevant articles at:   ESTATE PLANNING IS FOR EVERYONE/globalwealthadvisors

You’re never too Young to Estate Plan

Also Read our previous gs at :  Creating an Estate Plan Should Be a New Year’s Resolution

                                                          Am I Too Young to Think About Estate Planning?

 

 

 

Ozzy and Sharon estate Plan

Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne Have an Estate Plan

Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne Have an Estate Plan.  Heavy metal rock star Ozzy Osbourne and his talk show host wife, Sharon Osbourne say that they have a plan to pass the lion’s share of their estate to their children.

Ozzy rose to fame during the 1970s as the lead vocalist of the heavy metal band Black Sabbath, and Sharon became a household name more recently, thanks to her role in the MTV reality show “The Osbournes” and her job as a daytime talk show host.

Sharon explained the couple’s plan on The Talk, while reacting to news that the late Kirk Douglas bequeathed most of his $80 million fortune to charity when he died in February 2020 at age 103, reports I Heart Radio’s recent article entitled “Ozzy, Sharon Osbourne’s Children Will Determine The Fate Of Their Fortune.”

“Everybody is different,” Sharon said. “And I just know that my husband’s body of work, that he’s written, and kept us all in the lifestyle that we love, goes to my children.”

The children will also be entrusted with determining what will happen to Ozzy’s image and likeness, Sharon also said.

“I don’t want someone that never met my husband owning his name and likeness and selling T-shirts everywhere and whatever. No, it stays in the Osbourne family.”

Ozzy’s latest solo album, Ordinary Man—which is his 12th overall—already ranks as his highest-charting solo debut ever in the United Kingdom.

Between Ozzy’s equity in Black Sabbath, the solo recordings that he and Sharon have worked so hard to control and the hours of television in which the two have starred, it’s not hard to see the fruits of the couple’s labor benefitting several future generations of Osbournes.

Estate planning is important in every field and for everyone. However, it’s particularly important in the entertainment business, where will contests and questions about inheritances frequently are publicized in the press. To that end, the estates of celebrated artists like Frank Zappa, Kurt Cobain, Prince, Tom Petty, Chris Cornell and many others have been the subject of public battles in recent years.

Even if you are not about to release your latest solo album, you still need to work with an experienced estate planning attorney to make certain that your plans for your assets and property are carried out after your death.  That probably is why Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne Have an Estate Plan.

Reference: I Heart Radio (March 2, 2020) “Ozzy, Sharon Osbourne’s Children Will Determine The Fate Of Their Fortune”

Read more about this at:    OZZY OSBOURNE Will Leave His ‘Body Of Work’ To His Children, Says SHARON OSBOURNE

Also this might be interesting :   15 Kids Who Won’t Inherit A Dime From Their Celeb Parents (And 5 Who Are Already Millionaires)

Read about other Celebrities and their Estate planning from one of our previous Blogs: The Latest on Kirk Douglas’ Estate

How Can Celebrities’ Estate Planning Be Impacted by Alzheimer’s?

Walt Disney and his Grandchild

What are Walt Disney’s Heirs Worth?

What are Walt Disney’s Heirs Worth?  It’s not known just how much the Disney family is worth. GOBankingRates estimated the company’s net worth to be roughly $130 billion. Roy O.’s grandson, Roy P., said at one point that the family owns less than 3% of the company. Even so, that would put their fortune around $3.9 billion (not counting any investments in addition to Disney holdings).

Wealth Advisor’s recent article entitled “Disney Family Feud As Heirs Battle For $400 Million Trust Fund” says that in 1925, Walt married Lillian Bounds, a studio inker. Eight years later, she gave birth to Diane, and the couple later adopted their daughter Sharon as a baby.

Walt Disney is said to have adored his 10 grandchildren. When he died in 1966 of lung cancer, he left numerous trusts and family foundations for his family and heirs.

Walt’s younger daughter, Sharon, adopted one child, Victoria, with her first husband, Robert Brown. She then had twins, Brad and Michelle, with her second husband, Bill Lund. She died from breast cancer in 1993 at age 56. Michelle has never had a job and owns three homes, spending a lot of time in Newport Beach, CA according to Gardner.

Victoria reportedly lived an extravagant lifestyle that included $5,000-a-night suites at the Royal Palms in Las Vegas. One report notes that she once went on a Disney cruise ship and destroyed her suite to such a degree that Michael Eisner, then-CEO of the company, had to ask the trustees to pay for the damages. Her share of the family fortune was added to Brad’s and Michelle’s after she died in 2002 from health complications. However, Sharon’s twins later became embattled in a years-long feud over their $400 million trust fund. That inheritance was supposed to be distributed in annual payments and lump sums at five-year intervals at ages 35, 40, and 45. However, the trustees dispersed the payments to Michelle and withheld Brad’s.

Michelle and the trustees argued that Brad wasn’t able to take care of his share because of a “chronic cognitive disability” and that Bill, their father, was taking advantage of this to gain money, according to NBC News.

Bill said that the trustees were manipulating his daughter Michelle. Bill was previously a trustee but resigned after an allegation that he used trust money to gain more than $3 million in kickbacks from a real-estate deal. He reportedly agreed to an annual settlement of $500,000.  So we truly do not know what the Walt Disney’s Heirs Worth.

Reference: Wealth Advisor (Feb. 11, 2020) “Disney Family Feud As Heirs Battle For $400 Million Trust Fund”

Read some related articles at:                  The Disney’s, not the happiest family on Earth. /nbcnews.com

Disney Family Networth: Meet the family behind the media empire/businessinsider.com

Also Read one of our previous Blogs:                Are You Considering the Impact of Your Estate Plan on your Heirs?

 

Special Needs

Special Needs Guardianship Can Be a Challenge

Special Needs Guardianship Can Be a Challenge. A person who’s diagnosed with autism should have a named guardian before turning 18. At that point, the person can sign binding contracts, make health care decisions and sign IEPs (Individualized Education Plan) without parental involvement.

Autism Parenting’s recent article entitled “A Brief Overview of Special Needs Guardianship” explains that guardianship is a legal process in which a responsible person is named as the final decision maker for another. When it’s the parent and their child with autism, the parent can become the guardian of the 18-year-old with autism in a specific legal process. Guardianship gives the parent the final say, on all decisions regarding the child.

It’s not uncommon for a parent to be hesitant about becoming the guardian, especially if the child is developing well and has several abilities. One question to ask in this situation concerns the intellectual or developmental age of my child. If the honest answer is below the age 18 (like 14 or 12 years old), then you’ll want to ask yourself if you’d allow your 14-year-old make all healthcare, education, housing and financial decisions and have those decisions be legally binding. Probably not. In that case, you should look into guardianship.

If your adult child continues to develop and at some point down the road can make decisions on her own, the guardian can petition the court to have relationship revoked.

Another important time period that guardianship needs to be considered is when the parents die. The appointed guardian then will be responsible for day-to-day care or decisions on that day to day care. The selection of a guardian for this situation is often a large roadblock to finishing up a family’s plan.

The reason is because parents must make this decision before completing their will. If parents have trouble with choosing a potential guardian, consider these criteria when considering each person: location, family circumstances, their personality qualities and demeanor, their age, their experience with special needs individuals, the fact that the person knows your family member, your parent or your loved one knows the individual, their financial position, marital status and work schedule.

By the following factors, parents can rank each possible future guardian and settle on the best possible choice.

Although the guardian might never be as committed as a parent, if you use a more objective process (like the criteria above), parents will be better able to find a qualified future guardian.

Special Needs Guardianship Can Be a Challenge but with careful planning it can be achieved.

Reference: Autism Parenting (undated) “A Brief Overview of Special Needs Guardianship”

For More Information on this subject Click here: Guardianship and Conservatorship | Autism Speaks

Special Needs Children turning 18 Years Old -Caregiver.com

Also Read our Previous Blog at :  Estate Planning for Special Needs Family Members

 

long term care givers

How Can Long-Distance Caregivers Help Loved Ones?

How Can Long-Distance Caregivers Help Loved Ones? A recent article noted that long-distance caregivers have the same concerns and pressures as local caregivers, perhaps even more. They spend about twice as much on caregiving as people caring for a loved one nearby, because they’re more likely to need to hire help, take uncompensated time off work and pay for travel. A huge challenge for this group is just staying informed and assured that the person needing care is in good hands. As a result, long-distance caregivers must have good communication and a solid team on the ground.

AARP’s recent article entitled “Long-Distance Caregiving: 5 Key Steps to Providing Care From Afar” provides us with five steps to staying informed and effective as a long-distance caregiver and thoughts for implementing the measures.

  1. Be sure you have access to information. Having a means of receiving good information and possessing legal authority to make financial and health-care decisions is critical for all primary caregivers, but it’s even greater for ones caring from a distance. Arrange as much as you can during an in-person visit.
  • Start the discussion on finances and map out with your loved one how to pay for health care and everyday expenses.
  • Ask whether your parent or other senior is able to sign the forms or make the calls necessary to give doctors, hospitals and insurers permission to share information with you or another trusted family member. This should include banks and utilities.
  • Be sure the senior has designated a durable power of attorney for health care and financial decisions.
  • Know what to do in an emergency, as far as access to the home by a neighbor, if needed.
  1. Create your on-the-ground support team. Don’t try to do it all, especially if your loved one has more serious or complicated health issues. In addition to healthcare professionals, ask friends, family and community groups to join a network of caregiving helpmates. Remember to add your loved one as part of the team.
  • Assign roles and tasks, that the members of the team are willing and able to do.
  • Create a list with contact info for everyone and keep it up to date.
  1. Consider hiring a reputable caregiving professional. They’re often called a geriatric care manager, aging life care manager, or eldercare navigator or coordinator. These professionals are frequently licensed nurses or social workers who can also be valuable mediators or sounding boards, when family members disagree on care decisions.
  • Verify the person’s professional certifications, see how long the person has been in the field and request references.
  • Care managers can charge $50 to $200 an hour. Medicare doesn’t cover this service, nor do most health insurance plans. However, if you can handle it financially, an experienced manager may be able to save your family time, money and stress with even a short call.
  1. Find ways to communicate regularly with your local support group and loved one. You should leverage technology. With permission, place video monitors, wearable activity trackers, remote door locks to prevent wandering (if the care recipient has dementia) and even electronic pill dispensers that can tell you if someone has taken the prescribed medications.
  2. Leverage your visits. Nothing’s better than an in-person visit. When you can manage one, come with a list of things you need to know or discuss.
  • Interview possible home aides or house cleaners or meet with social workers or other professionals involved in your loved one’s care to discuss any concerns.
  • Look for signs of abuse, which means monitoring your senior’s checking account and see if there are any irregularities and look for red flags of physical or emotional mistreatment, like bruises, unexplained injuries, or a sudden change in personality. Note if your family member talks about a person you’ve never met who visits often and has been “very helpful.”

Although you may have several practical tasks to tick off your list, it’s important to spend quality time with your loved one. And seek the advice of a qualified elder law attorney, if you have any questions. This is some of the ways Long-Distance Caregivers can  help Loved Ones?

Reference: AARP (Oct. 30, 2019) “Long-Distance Caregiving: 5 Key Steps to Providing Care From Afar”

Read more about this topic at:

Getting Started with Long-Distance Caregiving

8 Tips for Long Distance Care Giving

You can also read one of our previous blogs at:  How your caregiver can get paid and treated fairly

Medicare Mistakes

The High Cost of Medicare Mistakes

The High Cost of Medicare Mistakes can be daunting. A 68-year-old woman knew that she had to sign up at age 65 for Medicare Part A for hospital care and Part B for outpatient care, since she did not have employer provided health insurance from an employer with 20 or more employees. She knew also that if she did not have health insurance from an employer and didn’t sign up immediately, she’d face a penalty with higher Part B and Part D premiums for the rest of her life when eventually she did sign up, reports Forbes in the article “Beware Medicare’s Part B Premium Penalty And Surcharge Traps.”

Here’s where it got sticky: she thought that Medicare provided an eight-month special enrollment period after one job ended to apply penalty free. She is employed on a sporadic basis, so she thought she had a window of time. Between the ages of 65 and 68, she had several jobs with large employers, and was never out of work for more than eight months.

She was out of work for 25 months total between ages 65 and 68, when she was not enrolled in Medicare. She thought that since she was never out of work for more than eight months, she didn’t have to sign up until she officially stopped working and would then enroll penalty free in traditional Medicare Parts A, B, and D.

She had read information on the Medicare website and her interpretation of the information was wrong. It was a costly mistake.

In determining whether you need to permanently pay a Medicare Part B penalty, Medicare counts up all the months between age 65 and the month you first enroll in Part B, even if you have a job with a large employer with no gaps in employment for more than eight months.

She got hit with a 20% lifetime Medicare Part B premium penalty. For every 12 months that you’re not covered by Medicare B after reaching 65 and before you enroll, the penalty is an additional 10%. And making things worse, she was hit with a Medicare Part B penalty based on the cumulative (not consecutive, which is an important difference) 25 months that she went without credible prescription drug coverage.

This is the sort of problem that does not self-resolve or get better over time. In this case, another mistake in timing is going to hurt her. She sold some assets and realized a capital gain in 2018, which increased her Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI). In 2020, she’s going to have to pay the Income Related Monthly Adjustment Amount (IRMAA). If your MAGI, two years before the current year, is less than $87,000, you are exempt from IRMAA in the current year. Her cost: $1,735.20 more this year. Had she instead realized those capital gains over the course of several years, her 2018 MAGI might not have crossed the $87,000 threshold. Most people are not aware of the IRMAA and take capital gains in larger amounts than they need.

This is a harsh lesson to learn, at a time in life when there’s not a lot of flexibility or time to catch up. Talking with an estate planning lawyer about Medicare and about tax planning, as well as having an estate plan created, would have spared this woman, and countless others, from the harsh consequences of her mistakes.

Reference: Forbes (Jan. 29, 2020) “Beware Medicare’s Part B Premium Penalty And Surcharge Traps”

Read More about this from CNBC at: Don’t make these common, costly Medicare mistakes

And from AARP:  How to Avoid Mistakes When enrolling in Medicare

Also check out our previous Blog:  New Medicare Rule Makes it Harder to Receive Home Care

Elder Law

When Do I Need an Elder Law Attorney?

Elder law is different from estate law, but they frequently address many of the same issues. Estate planning contemplates your finances and property to best provide for you and your family while you’re still alive but incapacitated. It also concerns itself with the estate you leave to your loved ones when you die, minimizing probate complications and potential estate tax bills. Elder law contemplates these same issues but also the scenario when you may need some form of long-term care, even your eligibility for Medicaid should you need it.

A recent article from The Balance’s asks “Do You or a Family Member Need to Hire an Elder Law Attorney?” According to the article there are a variety of options to adjust as economically and efficiently as possible to plan for all eventualities. An elder law attorney can discuss these options with you.

Medicaid is a complicated subject, and really requires the assistance of an expert. The program has rigid eligibility guidelines in the event you require long-term care. The program’s benefits are income- and asset-based. However, you can’t simply give everything away to qualify, if you think you might need this type of care in the near future. There are strategies that should be implemented because the “spend down” rules and five-year “look back” period reverts assets or money to your ownership for qualifying purposes, if you try to transfer them to others. An elder law attorney will know these rules well and can guide you.

You’ll need the help and advice of an experienced elder law attorney to assist with your future plans, if one or more of these situations apply to you:

  • You’re in a second (or later) marriage;
  • You’re recently divorced;
  • You’ve recently lost a spouse or another family member;
  • Your spouse is incapacitated and requires long-term care;
  • You own one or more businesses;
  • You have real estate in more than one state;
  • You have a disabled family member;
  • You’re disabled;
  • You have minor children or an adult “problem” child;
  • You don’t have children;
  • You’d like to give a portion of your estate to charity;
  • You have significant assets in 401(k)s and/or IRAs; or
  • You have a taxable estate for estate tax purposes.

If you have any of these situations, you should seek the help of an elder law attorney.

If you fail to do so, you’ll most likely give a sizeable percentage of your estate to the state, an ex-spouse, or the IRS.

State probate laws are very detailed as to what can and can’t be included in a will, trust, advance medical directive, or financial power of attorney. These laws control who can and can’t serve as a personal representative, trustee, health care surrogate, or attorney-in-fact under a power of attorney.

Hiring an experienced elder law attorney can help you and your family avoid simple but expensive mistakes, if you or your family attempt this on your own.

Reference: The Balance (Jan. 21, 2020) “Do You or a Family Member Need to Hire an Elder Law Attorney?”

Read more at:

What Does An Elder Law Attorney Do?

What is Elder Law and How Can an Elder Law Attorney Help Me?

Also read one of our previous blogs at :

Elder Law Attorney Can Help Plan for Long-Term Care Costs

Join Our eNews

WATCH OUR MASTERCLASS