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Online Wills

C19 UPDATE: Beware the Rush to Make Your Own Will Online

C19 UPDATE: Beware the Rush to Make Your Own Will Online   With COVID-19 affecting more and more Americans, people across the country are scrambling to set up wills and end-of-life directives. Over the last two weeks, online will companies have seen an explosion in users, according to the article, “Coronavirus Pandemic Triggers Rush by Americans to Make Online Wills,” published by CNBC.com.

However, as online wills grow in popularity, estate and elder lawyers increasingly caution against using them, for several reasons.

  • Will the documents be legally valid? Since most of these do-it-yourself wills are created and executed without any oversight from an attorney, a larger number of wills may not be executed in compliance with the proper will formalities, and that could end up invalidating the will.
  • Do you fully understand the questions and consequences of your answers? There are many nuances in estate planning, as well as a good bit of legal jargon. Confusion over the question or the consequences of a decision can result in costly mistakes … and could even mean your will won’t hold up to a challenge in court.
  • What about asset protection? There is more to estate planning than just giving your stuff away after you die. How you transfer ownership of your assets can mean the difference between a protected inheritance and legacy for many generations … or the squandering or loss of a person’s life’s work within a few years … or months … after they pass away.
  • Is there any planning for long-term care? It’s estimated that more than half of people turning age 65 who will need some type of long-term care services in their lifetimes. Proper estate planning should balance the possibility that you will need assistance paying for nursing home care (Medicaid), with other estate planning goals. Mistakes in this area could disqualify you from receiving assistance should you need it.

As COVID-19 keeps people home, meeting with a lawyer to create a will could not be easier. In most states, a lawyer’s services have been deemed “essential,” even during stay-at-home orders. We are doing everything we can to make our services as easy and convenient for you as possible, including meeting over telephone, online video services and other innovative ways to ensure you get the planning you need while complying with all safety measures.

Resource: Coronavirus Pandemic Triggers Rush by Americans to Make Online Wills, https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/25/coronavirus-pandemic-triggers-rush-by-americans-to-make-online-wills.html

Read more about this in related articles at:

Where You Can Go Wrong With a Do-It-Yourself Will/CNBC

The Problems With Do-It-Yourself Online Wills/Forbes

Also read our previous Blog at:

What Do Parents Need to Know About Writing a Will?

 

Power of Attorney

The Second Most Powerful Estate Planning Document: Power of Attorney

The Second Most Powerful Estate Planning Document: Power of Attorney.  All too often, people wait until it’s too late to execute a power of attorney. It’s uncomfortable to think about giving someone full access to our finances, while we are still competent. However, a power of attorney can be created that is fully exercisable only when needed, according to a useful article “Power of attorney can be tailored to circumstances” from The News-Enterprise. Some estate planning attorneys believe that the power of attorney, or POA, is actually the second most important estate planning document after a will. Here’s what a POA can do for you.

The term POA is a reference to the document, but it also is used to refer to the person named as the agent in the document.

Generally speaking, any POA creates a fiduciary relationship, for either legal or financial purposes. A Medical or Healthcare POA creates a relationship for healthcare decisions. Sometimes these are for a specific purpose or for a specific period of time. However, a Durable POA is created to last until death or until it is revoked. It can be created to cover a wide array of needs.

Here’s the critical fact: a POA of any kind needs to be executed, that is, agreed to and signed by a person who is competent to make legal decisions. The problem occurs when family members or spouse do not realize they need a POA, until their loved one is not legally competent and does not understand what they are signing.

Incompetent or incapacitated individuals may not sign legal documents. Further, the law protects people from improperly signing, by requiring two witnesses to observe the individual signing.

The law does allow those with limited competency to sign estate planning documents, so long as they are in a moment of lucidity at the time of the signing. However, this is tricky and can be dangerous, as legal issues may be raised for all involved, if capacity is challenged later on.

If someone has become incompetent and has not executed a valid power of attorney, a loved one will need to apply for guardianship. This is a court process that is expensive, takes several months and leads to the court being involved in many aspects of the person’s life. The basics of this process: three professionals are needed to personally assess the “respondent,” the person who is said to be incompetent. The respondent loses all rights to make decisions of any kind for themselves. They also lose the right to vote.

A power of attorney can be executed quickly and does not require the person to lose any rights.

The biggest concern to executing a power of attorney, is that the person is giving an agent the control of their money and property. This is true, but the POA can be created so that it does not hand over this control immediately.

This is where the “springing” power of attorney comes in. Springing POA means that the document, while executed immediately, does not become effective for use by the agent, until a certain condition is met. The document can be written that the POA becomes in effect, if the person is deemed mentally incompetent by a doctor. The springing clause gives the agent the power to act if and when it is necessary for someone else to take over the individual’s affairs.

Having an estate planning attorney create the power of attorney that is best suited for each individual’s situation is the most sensible way to provide the protection of a POA, without worrying about giving up control while one is competent.

Reference: The News-Enterprise (Feb. 24, 2020) “Power of attorney can be tailored to circumstances”

Read More About this subject at:

9 Things You Need To Know About Power Of Attorney/Forbes

Power of Attorney/AmericanBarAssociation

Also read our previous Blogs at:

Why Do I Need a Power of Attorney?

C19 UPDATE: If You Have Not Yet Named Someone with Medical Power of Attorney, Do It Now

What Is the VA’s Plan for Long-Term Care for Baby Boomers?

What Is the VA’s Plan for Long-Term Care for Baby Boomers?  Teresa Boyd, Assistant Deputy Undersecretary for Health at the Veterans Health Administration recently told House Veterans Affairs Subcommittee on Health members they would have to wait another few weeks before the VA’s “Elderly Strategic Plan” will be ready for release. Even so, lawmakers asked the VHA official about issues found in a recent Government Accountability Office report.

Military.com’s recent article entitled “Lawmakers Scrutinize VA’s Plans to Provide Long-Term Care for Aging Baby Boomers” reports that there are currently about 3.2 million veterans aged 65 years or older using VA health care services. The GAO found that the VA anticipates the amount of long-term care provided to veterans with service-connected disabilities will increase by 18% from fiscal 2017 to 2037, plus another 5% to provide the services to post-9/11 veterans.

The government watchdog report identified three issues facing the VA, as it prepares for a generation of aging Baby Boomers:

  1. Staffing shortages
  2. Access to specialized providers; and
  3. Trouble getting to vets in rural areas.

Boyd said that the VA’s plan will address the concerns listed by the GAO.

Despite the VA’s ongoing improvements to scholarship and student loan payback programs to attract more staff, Representative Conor Lamb, D-Pennsylvania, wasn’t as optimistic. He’s concerned the current administration’s actions against VA unions will detract those the VA is trying to court. The Trump administration had cut a type of pay union representatives receive, while pursuing grievances on behalf of bargaining units and requiring union staff to pay for office space.

“The type of people who are going to take a home health aide or assistance job are often the people who need that sort of protection and support the most,” he said. “And I think for us to recruit the best of the best in that category for the next generation, you want the people who are already there telling their friends, ‘Hey, VA’s a great place to work. They stick up for us; they pay us well; they take care of our needs if we get sick … ‘”

Lamb asked the VA to consider this, as it looks at the obstacles found in the GAO report.

Meanwhile, Brownley and other lawmakers advocated for more investments in the VA’s in-home, long-term care programs.

“In recent years, stakeholders have largely focused on VA’s community care and caregiver programs. While these are essential areas for VA to get right, the scale of the silver tsunami is something VA cannot afford to get wrong,” Brownley said. “Millions of veterans and their families are relying on us to ensure their later years are as dignified and healthy as possible.”

Boyd agreed that many seniors want to remain in their own homes as long as possible, rather than moving to a facility for their long-term care. Boyd reported that the results of one of the VA’s in-home programs, Choose Home, have played a role in developing the strategic plan to be released in the next few weeks.

Reference: military.com (March 9, 2020) “Lawmakers Scrutinize VA’s Plans to Provide Long-Term Care for Aging Baby Boomers”

Check out more related articles at :

The 2030 Problem: Caring for Aging Baby Boomers

Long-term Care Planning for Baby Boomers: Addressing an Uncertain Future

You can also read one of our previous Blogs at :

Do I Need Long-Term Care and Why?

What Do I Need to Know Before I have Mom Move in with My Family?

What Do I Need to Know Before I have Mom Move in with My Family?   Multigenerational living can help an aging parent avoid the sense of isolation and depression that may come with living alone. However, by this time in life, you have a set way of doing things. Your likes, dislikes, value, and personalities have also changed over time.

AARP’s article from 2018 asks “Considering Moving Your Loved One into Your Home?” This is still a timely article. It notes that, regardless of how close and loving your relationship may be, adding another person to your household changes the dynamics for the entire family. The journey will be smoother, if you and your loved one go in with some clear parameters.

First, prior to moving your parent into the guest room, ask yourself a few questions:

  • How will the move impact my spouse, children and my siblings?
  • How will my parent’s presence impact my family routine, activities and privacy?
  • Will I need to remodel the house or add a bedroom or bath?
  • Will my siblings help with some expenses?
  • Can we afford to do this?
  • Should part of my parent’s income be used to help defray living expenses?
  • Will this change require me to alter my work schedule?
  • How will I create boundaries?
  • How does my parent feel about moving in with my family?
  • How do I feel about this change?

Next, your parent should consider these questions.

  • Will this move take me away from people or activities I enjoy?
  • Do I like being with this family for long periods of time?
  • Are they expecting me to contribute some of my income or savings to living expenses?
  • If the home requires remodeling to accommodate me, am I able to help pay for it?
  • Will my other children help out?
  • If I don’t like something my child does, am I comfortable talking to him about it?
  • What are my feelings about being dependent?

You should then have an open and frank discussion about expectations, fears, finances and any lingering issues. It may be as easy as telling each other what bothers you (since the other person may not otherwise know and would be happy to make a change).

After this, create a list of the positive aspects and refer to it when you have a bad day with the arrangement.

Next, conduct a pair of meetings. Let your children know that they’re not the cause of their grandparent’s possible negative reactions, such as anger, weeping or fear. Tell them that the whole family needs to contribute, but they aren’t responsible for caregiving or fixing their grandparent. Discuss ways that the children can help their grandparent.

The other meeting is with your siblings. In addition to acknowledging that your parent needs help and will likely need more, it can be an emotional realization for all of you. Talk it out. You also shouldn’t be shy about asking for help.

Gifts of time are important in helping you manage other responsibilities in your life. Let your siblings know about your anticipated needs, like serving as a back-up and respite care, help with chores, meals delivered, grocery and prescription pickup and money to offset increased living expenses or to hire an aide.

Reference: AARP (Jan. 22, 2018) “Considering Moving Your Loved One into Your Home?”

Read more about this subject at:

Should Your Aging Parent Move in with You?

Preparing for a Parent Living with you

Also check out one of our previous Blogs at:

Caring for Your Aging Parents – An Elder Law Attorney’s Top 5 Questions and Answers

POA COVID

C19 UPDATE: If You Have Not Yet Named Someone with Medical Power of Attorney, Do It Now

C19 UPDATE: If You Have Not Yet Named Someone with Medical Power of Attorney, Do It Now!  Stop procrastinating and get this crucial planning in place now.

What is a Medical Power of Attorney?

A medical power of attorney is a legal document you use to give someone else authority to make medical decisions for you when you can no longer make them yourself.  This person, also known as an agent, can only exercise this power if your doctor says you are unable to make key decisions yourself.

Other Terms for Medical Power of Attorney

Depending on the state where you live, the medical power of attorney may be called something else. You may have seen this referred to as a health care power of attorney, an advance directive, advance health care directive, a durable power of attorney for health care, etc. There are many variations, but they all mean fundamentally the same thing.

Be aware that each state has their own laws about medical powers of attorney, so it’s important to work with a qualified estate planning attorney to ensure your decisions will be enforced through legally binding documents. Also, some states may not honor documents from other states, so even if you made these decisions and created documents in another state, it’s wise to review with an estate attorney to ensure they are legally valid in your state now.

What Can My Medical Agent Do for Me?    What Is a Health Care Agent?

Just like there are many different terms for the medical power of attorney, there also are different terms for the medical agent – this person may be referred to as an attorney-in-fact, a health proxy, or surrogate.

Some of the things a medical POA authorizes your agent to decide for you:

  • Which doctors or facilities to work with and whether to change
  • Give consent for additional testing or treatment
  • How aggressively to treat
  • Whether to disconnect life support

We are ready to help walk you through these decisions, understand the ramifications of your choices, and memorialize your plans in binding legal documents. We are currently offering no-contact initial conferences remotely if you prefer. Book a call now and let us help you make the right choices for yourself and your loved ones.

Read other related articles at :  Power of Attorney/AmericanBarAssociaton

Powers of Attorney: Crucial Documents for Caregiving

Also view our previous Posts at : 

What to Know About a Power of Attorney?

Why Is a Power of Attorney Important?

What is the Difference between Guardianship and Power of Attorney?

What is the Difference between Guardianship and Power of Attorney? Protecting yourself or a loved one can take many different forms, since aging takes a toll on the ability to handle financial and medical decisions. In most situations, guardianship or a power of attorney does the trick, says the article “Guardianships vs. Powers of Attorney” from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.  How to know which is the best one to use?

A guardianship is a court-authorized assignment of surrogate decision-making power for the benefit of a person who has lost the ability to make informed decisions on their own, often described as a person who has become incapacitated. The decisions that another person can make on their behalf can be very broad, or they can be very specific.

If a person becomes incapacitated, either through a slowly progressing illness like dementia or quickly, as the result of an accident, a judge will appoint a person or sometimes an organization to handle health care and financial decisions. The court-appointed guardian or organization could be a person or agency you have never heard of and would not know your family or anything about you.

Yes, that is scary. However, guardianship takes place when families do not plan in advance to appoint a surrogate decision maker, also known as an “agent.”

Here’s even more scary news: once the court has appointed a guardian, that relationship may continue for the rest of the incapacitated person’s life. That means annual accountings and involvement with the court, legal fees and other professional fees the guardian or court deems necessary.

There are some guardians who have made headlines for stealing money and making care decisions that the individual and their families did not want.

Meeting with an estate planning attorney to prepare for incapacity as part of an overall estate plan is a far better way. Why don’t more people do it?

  • They aren’t aware of the importance of power of attorney.
  • They don’t want to spend the money.
  • They don’t know who to choose as their power of attorney
  • They don’t want to think about incapacity or death.

In contrast to a court-supervised lifetime guardianship, a properly drafted power of attorney can provide for an agent to make a variety of financial and medical decisions. The person named as a power of attorney (the agent) can serve for the person’s lifetime, just like a guardian.

This is the most fundamental estate planning document, after the last will and testament. Once it’s prepared, you can always change your mind and you or your agent never need to go to court. Hopefully this shed some light  on what the difference between a Guardianship and a Power of Attorney is.

Reference: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Feb. 24, 2020) “Guardianships vs. Powers of Attorney”

Read other articles pertaining to this subject at : THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POWERS  OF ATTORNEY AND GUARDIANSHIPS/AARP

                                                                                                          Power of attorney and guardianship: What’s the difference?/care.com

You can also read some of our previous Blogs at :

Will Florida’s New Legislation Help Seniors in Guardianships?

When Do I Need a Power of Attorney?

Young Family

Estate Planning Is For Everyone

Estate planning is something anyone who is 18 years old or older needs to think about, advises the article “Estate planning for every stage of life from the Independent Record. It includes much more than a person’s last will and testament. It protects you from incapacity, provides the legal right to allow others to talk to your doctors if you can’t and takes care of your minor children, if an unexpected tragedy occurs. Let’s look at all the ages and stages where estate planning is needed.

Parents of young adults should discuss estate planning with their children. While parents devote decades to helping their children become independent adults, sometimes life doesn’t go the way you expect. A college freshman is more concerned with acing a class, joining a club and the most recent trend on social media. However, a parent needs to think about what happens when the child is over 18 and has a medical emergency. Parents have no legal rights to medical information, medical decision making or finances, once a child becomes a legal adult. Hospitals may not release private information and doctors can’t talk with parents, even in an extreme situation. Young adults need to have a HIPAA release, a durable power of medical attorney and a power of attorney for their finances created.

New parents also need estate planning. While it may be hard to consider while adjusting to having a new baby in the house, what would happen to that baby if something unexpected were to affect both parents? The estate planning attorney will create a last will and testament, which is used to name a guardian for any minor children, in case both parents pass. This also includes decisions that need to be made about the child’s education, medical treatment and even their social life. You’ll need to name someone to be the child’s guardian, and to be sure that they will raise your child the same way that you would.

An estate plan includes naming a conservator, who is a person with control over a minor child’s finances. You’ll want to name a responsible person who is trustworthy and good with handling money. It is possible to name the same person as guardian and conservator. However, it may be wise to separate the responsibilities.

An estate plan also ensures that your children receive their inheritance, when you think they will be responsible enough to handle it. If a minor child’s parents die and there is no  plan, the parent’s assets will be held by the court for the benefit of the child. Once the child turns 18, he or she will receive the entire amount in one lump sum. Few who are 18-years old are able to manage large sums of money. Estate planning helps you control how the money is distributed. This is also something to consider, when your children are the beneficiaries of any life insurance policies. An estate planning attorney can help you set up trusts, so the monies are distributed at the right time.

When people enter their ‘golden’ years—that is, they are almost retired—it is the time for estate plans to be reviewed. You may wish to name your children as power of attorney and medical power of attorney, rather than a sibling. It’s best to have people who will be younger than you for these roles as you age. This may also be the time to change how your wealth is distributed. Are your children old enough to be responsible with an inheritance? Do you want to create a legacy plan that includes charitable giving?

Lastly, update your estate plan any time there are changes in the family structure. Divorce, death, marriage or individuals with special needs all require a different approach to the basic estate plan. It’s a good idea to revisit an estate plan anytime there have been major changes in your relationships, to the law, or changes to your financial status.

Reference: Independent Record (March 1, 2020) “Estate planning for every stage of life

Read more relevant articles at:   ESTATE PLANNING IS FOR EVERYONE/globalwealthadvisors

You’re never too Young to Estate Plan

Also Read our previous gs at :  Creating an Estate Plan Should Be a New Year’s Resolution

                                                          Am I Too Young to Think About Estate Planning?

 

 

 

COVID 19 AND SMALL BUSINESSES

C19 UPDATE: Small Businesses Hurt by COVID-19 May Qualify for SBA Disaster Relief Loans

C19 UPDATE: Small Businesses Hurt by COVID-19 May Qualify for SBA Disaster Relief Loans.  It’s estimated that some 30 million US small businesses may fall victim to the coronavirus through closures, cancellations and other revenue losses. With no clear end in sight, the Small Business Administration (SBA) is offering eligible businesses low-interest disaster relief loans to cover operating expenses.

These loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that can’t be paid because of the disaster’s impact. The interest rate is 3.75% for small businesses. The interest rate for non-profits is 2.75%. In order to keep payments affordable, they are offering long-term repayments, up to a maximum of 30 years. Terms are determined on a case-by-case basis, based upon each borrower’s ability to repay.

The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering designated states and territories low-interest federal disaster loans for working capital to small businesses suffering substantial economic injury as a result of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). Upon a request received from a state’s or territory’s Governor, SBA will issue under its own authority, as provided by the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act that was recently signed by the President, an Economic Injury Disaster Loan declaration.

For more information on areas currently eligible for SBA disaster relief and to apply for a loan, visit the SBA website at https://www.sba.gov/disaster-assistance/coronavirus-covid-19 or call the SBA disaster assistance customer service center at 1-800-659-2955 (TTY: 1-800-877-8339) or e-mail  disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.

Resources: SBA Disaster Assistance in Response to the Coronavirus.

Read Related Articles at :

SBA to Provide Disaster Assistance Loans for Small Businesses Impacted by Coronavirus (COVID-19)

SBA Updates Criteria on States for Requesting Disaster Assistance Loans for Small Businesses Impacted by Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Also read one of our previous Blogs at:

C19 UPDATE: Paying for Covid-19 Testing and Treatment if You Have a High Deductible Insurance Plan

C19 UPDATE: Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now

Alzheimer’s

New Blood Test May Make Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Easier

New Blood Test May Make Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Easier.  Researchers at the University of California – UC San Francisco have analyzed the blood test in more than 300 patients and believe that they will see such a test available in doctor’s offices within five years, according to a press release from The University of California- San Francisco’s entitled “New Blood Test Could Make Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Easier Than Ever.”

“This test could eventually be deployed in a primary care setting for people with memory concerns to identify who should be referred to specialized centers to participate in clinical trials or to be treated with new Alzheimer’s therapies, once they are approved,” said Adam Boxer, MD, PhD, neurologist at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center and senior author of the study published in Nature Medicine. Boxer also is affiliated with the UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences.

There is currently no blood test for either condition. Alzheimer’s diagnoses can only be confirmed by a PET scan of the brain, which can be expensive or an invasive lumbar puncture to test cerebrospinal fluid.

If approved, the new blood test could make screening easier and help increase the number of patients eligible for clinical trials—vital to the search for drugs to stop or slow dementia. Patients who know whether they have Alzheimer’s or FTD are also better able to manage their symptoms.

In the new study, scientists collected blood samples from 362 people aged 58 to 70, including 56 individuals who’d been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, 190 diagnosed with FTD, 47 with mild cognitive impairment, plus 69 healthy controls.

Researchers checked the blood samples for proteins that could serve as signs of dementia. One protein, called pTau181, is known to aggregate in tangles in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s. Blood levels of pTau181 were about 3½ times higher in people with Alzheimer’s as opposed to their healthy peers. People with FTD had normal levels of pTau181, and those with mild cognitive impairment due to underlying Alzheimer’s had an intermediate increase.

When researchers followed the patients for two years, they saw that higher levels of pTau181 predicted more rapid cognitive decline in those with Alzheimer’s or mild cognitive impairment.

The researchers note the new blood test has the same degree of accuracy as current PET scans and lumbar punctures in distinguishing Alzheimer’s from FTD. It would be less expensive and easier.

Alzheimer’s impacts nearly 6 million Americans and comprises two-thirds of dementia cases. FTD includes a broad group of brain disorders often linked with degeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. So this New Blood Test May Make Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Easier.

Reference: UCSF (March 2, 2020) “New Blood Test Could Make Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Easier Than Ever”

Read more related articles at: 

Simple Blood Test May be Able to Diagnose Alzheimer’s Disease

Blood test is highly accurate at identifying Alzheimer’s before symptoms arise

How to Pay for a Loved One’s Memory Care and Manage Their Finances

Also read our previous Blogs at: 

How Do I Prepare my Parents for Alzheimer’s?

How Do We Live Our Lives When A Loved One Has Alzheimer’s?

 

 

 

Corona Virus signing Docs

Coronavirus Trusts? Suddenly Estate Planning Is More Popular

Coronavirus Trusts? Suddenly Estate Planning Is More Popular than ever.

Coronavirus Trusts? Suddenly Estate Planning More Popular Than Stockpiling Food as Advisors Arrange Wills and Trusts for Elderly Clients

The global pandemic of COVID-19 has numerous people thinking a question they have refused to face – what if? But now that they are, they are now also facing their own mortality, and realizing that they do not have the basic estate planning documents.

As stated in a recent article, to protect yourself and your loved ones, now’s a good time to make sure that you have the following four documents prepared and updated.

  • A will or revocable trust.
    • Many people choose a trust for the passage of assets to loved ones at death without the need for probate, but others can choose a will, especially those that have modest estates.
  • Beneficiary designations on financial accounts.
    • Many assets do not pass through a will or trust, such as an IRA, 401(k) account, or life insurance policy, and instead the proceeds go to the person you name as beneficiary of that account.
  • Healthcare durable power of attorney.
    • A durable power of attorney for healthcare will give the person you designate as your agent the ability to make the medical decisions you specify on your behalf. Check with your healthcare provider to see what they prefer to see in a healthcare power of attorney to ensure a smooth transition if you become incompetent.
  • Financial durable power of attorney.
    •  In the chance that you become incompetent, financial responsibilities continue. You can tailor your financial power of attorney as narrowly or broadly as you want, ranging from simply being able to pay bills on your behalf to making major changes to your investment portfolio. It’s no wonder Corona Virus Trusts are suddenly making estate planning more popular!

For related articles click here:   Impact of COVID-19 on Estate Planning/TheNationalLawReview

   Estate Planning During the Coronavirus Pandemic

 

Also view our previous Blog at :

C19 UPDATE: Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now

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