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Estate Plan

Plan, Don’t Wait, for an Emergency

Plan, Don’t Wait, for an Emergency!

That sounds like something your mother might say, right? And how often have you wished that you’d followed mother’s good advice?

 

Nobody really wants to think in advance about accidents or illness. But if no advance planning has been done, and if an elderly parent has broken a hip, say, and is about to be discharged from the hospital, the family must make crucial decisions in a highly stressful situation. There may be little, if any, time to figure out which living option is the best.

 

So, listen to mother. Plan ahead with your parents, if possible, so you will have your strategy ready when it’s needed.

 

Would your parents want to stay home? Move to a retirement community? Relocate to be closer to children?

 

Research the options. You might be surprised at how attractive many retirement communities are. There are increasing opportunities for independent or assisted living. Some facilities also offer transition into memory care, if that becomes needed.

 

Look into Caring.com, or call 800.973.1540. This is a comprehensive resource that offers information and guidance nationally, for living options and caregivers. Then, when you have researched what’s out there, talk with your parents about the pros and cons of the various choices.

 

Most people want to stay home for as long as possible. In-home care might be an option.

 

To connect with caregiving services for older adults and families, consult Eldercare Locator, a service of the U.S. Administration on Aging, on-line at eldercare.acl.gov or at 1.800.677.1116. The Eldercare Locator also provides information on local Area Agencies on Aging. These can be very helpful.

 

A care manager might be an option. These people have the experience and expertise to coordinate the many elements involved in elder care: medical providers, financial planners, elder-law attorneys, and rehabilitation specialists. Or, such people can work on an hourly basis, to pick up prescriptions, accompany your parent to doctors’ appointments, and coordinate communication with long-distance family. Find care managers through the Aging Life Care Association, aginglifecare.org, or at 520.881.8008.

 

If possible, urge your parents to get their legal documents in order while they are still in good health.

 

That is the best time to make sure that your parents have done the necessary legal documents. They may want to visit our office by themselves, but suggest to them that they provide you with copies of the documents. That way you will have the papers ready when you need them, and you won’t have to search for them under time pressure.

 

You can hope for the best, or you can plan for your parents’ well-being.

 

Do both. Call us now at (904) 880-5554! Or Book a Call Here!

 

Read more related articles at:

Millennials, It’s Time To Talk Estate Planning With Your Parents from Financial Advisors Mag

Are You A Millennial? Talk to Your Parents About Estate Planning

Also, Read one of our previous Blogs at:

The Estate Planning Conversation To Have with Your Parents

April is Parkinson’s Awareness Month Get Your Estate Plan in Order NOW!

Every month of April, the global Parkinson’s community engages to support awareness of Parkinson’s disease (PD), a disease whose cause remains largely unknown although treatment options exist. This year the Parkinson’s Foundation campaign theme is #KnowMorePD. The goal of raising awareness can help make lives better for people with Parkinson’s disease, generate ideas to improve care, educate, and fundraise to help advance research toward finding a cure.

Effectively, Parkinson’s is a disease where nerve cells that normally deliver the neurotransmitter dopamine to other cells experience a reduction in numbers. The more cell death spreads to larger areas of the brain, the greater the body is affected. Symptoms of Parkinson’s typically develop slowly throughout the years, with symptom progressions varying from person to person because of the diversity of the disease. The neurodegenerative disorder can manifest itself through tremors, bradykinesia (slowness of movement), limb rigidity, and gait and balance problems. Dopamine reduction can also produce nonmotor symptoms, often preceding a PD diagnosis. These symptoms can include REM sleep behavioral disorder, automatic dysfunction, depressions, visual impairment, attention deficit, reduced sense of smell, and difficulties planning and acting on ordinary tasks. Parkinson’s disease is not in itself fatal; however, disease complications can be serious.

The PD Foundation website has offerings by state. Local impact, education, and support are hallmarks of the foundation’s work. Individuals can plug in their zip code on the website Parkinson’s Foundation in your area for their closest PD chapter to become involved. Whether your interest is in exercise classes, therapy services, research trials, or caregiving support, visiting a local PD website in any state can point you in the direction you need.

California’s large and diverse population makes it an ideal state to study and expand our understanding of Parkinson’s disease. The state’s Department of Health has a chronic disease surveillance and research branch (CDSRB) that collects data to measure PD’s incidence and prevalence. This research brings awareness to the disease through the California Parkinson’s Disease Registry. Statistics about how the disease is distributed among different population groups and whether the disease patterns are changing over time may lead to insights about PD about which we know surprisingly little.

In 2021, about one million people live with Parkinson’s disease, with approximately 600,000 receiving a PD diagnosis each year, with men 1.5 times more likely to have Parkinson’s than women. Estimates are that direct and indirect costs of Parkinson’s, including treatment, lost income, and social security payments account for nearly 52 billion in US expenditure annually. Just the medication averages about 2,500 dollars per year, and the cost of therapeutic surgery can be upwards of 100,000 dollars per individual.

The terms incidence (new cases arising in a population over a given time) and prevalence (a measure of all individuals affected by the disease at a particular time) are often cited when discussing who suffers from Parkinson’s disease. Does prevalence vary by study, population group, and geography? Statistics generated by studying larger and more diverse populations can address these questions. Considering the last major prevalence study was in 1978, Parkinson’s disease studies are long overdue.

The statistics matter as the Parkinson’s Foundation continues to attract state and federal government and the pharmaceutical industry to address the urgent, growing need to understand and hopefully prevent PD. As a nation, we need to understand better who develops Parkinson’s and why. Much of the research focuses on ways to identify PD biomarkers, leading to earlier diagnosis and tailored treatments to slow down the disease process. While all current therapies can slow the process and improve symptoms, they do not slow or halt the disease progression. Idiopathic Parkinson’s disease progression tends to be variable and slow, making research all the more difficult, particularly when comorbidities are present.

On social media platforms and other online forums such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Reddit, Linkedin, WhatsApp, and more, #KnowMorePD for this April’s Parkinson’s Awareness theme helps to promote the foundation’s campaign cross-platform. The goal is to have conversations among loved ones, family, friends, neighbors, care teams, and the community will lead to more education, action, funding, and understanding of Parkinson’s disease.

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with Parkinsons’ disease, there are a number of ways we can help. For example, we can create a comprehensive legal plan to make sure you or your loved one has the proper documents in place to cover care decisions, financial decisions, and what to do in the event of a disability. We welcome the opportunity to speak with you in a confidential setting to determine how we might help.

Read more related articles at:

Exercise May Slow Cognitive Decline in At-Risk Patients With Parkinson Disease

Exercise May Slow Cognitive Decline in Some With Early Parkinson Disease

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

The Latest Treatments for Alzheimer’s Disease

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

Estate Battle with Millions at Stake in New Orleans

Estate Battle with Millions at Stake in New Orleans

Jessica Fussell Brandt filed an eviction petition against her daughter, Julie Hartline, her son-in-law Darryl Hartline and two grandchildren, Alexis and Zachary Hartline. She is pitted against them in a legal fight over an estate valued at more than $300 million, reports nola.com in the article “In Ray Brandt estate battle, widow tries to evict family from Old Metairie compound.”

Before auto magnate Ray Brandt died at age 72 from pancreatic cancer, the entire family shared a compound that includes two mansions located next to the Metairie Country Club. Brandt has been trying to sell the property which belongs to the estate, as its executrix. The family members living there don’t want to move, even taking down “For Sale” signs from the lawn.

Her attempt to evict them comes after she won a case in her attempt to maintain control of her late husband’s estate, which includes a large number of auto dealerships and collision centers across Louisiana and Mississippi.

On January 25, a Jefferson Parish judge invalidated the last will and testament that Ray Brandt signed just weeks before his death and another last will drafted in 2015. The district judge ruled that both last wills contained a flaw in how they were notarized: neither notarization specified that Ray Brandt, the witnesses, and the notary were together when it was signed.

The decision is being appealed, but it appears to leave the fate of Brandt’s empire to a last will he made in 2010. Unlike the others, this last will places Jessica Brandt in full control of his estate and trust, including the auto dealerships, until her death.

Ultimately, Ray Brandt directed that her grandchildren, who he legally adopted as adults before he died, would split the estate’s assets.

Despite issuing a statement saying that Jessica was “pleased with the prospect beginning the healing process,” after the Jefferson Parish decision, the eviction filing revealed that Jessica’s attorneys sent an email urging family members to leave the property by January 31, 2021.

Jessica made a statement that her wish to evict family members was a result of the multiple citations issued by Jefferson Parish for continuing violations at the compound. The latest one was for a trailer and mud buggy parked in a driveway on a vacant lot. She also said that the family members own two other homes, one in Metairie and one in Fort Beauregard.

The compound where the family settled seven years ago is estimated to be worth more than $8 million.

The heart of the dispute pits Jessica Brandt against Archbishop Rummel High School principal Marc Milano, who Ray Brandt named as a trustee to oversee the auto group and the rest of the estate until Jessica Brandt dies. Milano has accused Jessica of taking money from the estate and trying to claim an ownership interest in the dealership. She sued him for defamation.

Now the grandchildren have filed their own legal action, challenging a petition to put Ray Brandt’s last will into effect. Their argument is the trust that Ray Brandt set up in 2015 makes it clear that he meant for Milano to oversee the assets.

This estate battle will no doubt keep the Jefferson Parish courts and newspapers busy for some time. It’s a lesson to keep your family’s business private, by ensuring that your estate plan is properly prepared and up to date.

Reference: nola.com (Feb. 3, 2021) “In Ray Brandt estate battle, widow tries to evict family from Old Metairie compound”

Read more related articles at:

Fate of Ray Brandt’s auto empire in doubt amid roiling family squabble over estate

‘Stop all of this!’ Ray Brandt’s widow bemoans the family battle over his massive estate

In Ray Brandt estate battle, widow tries to evict family from Old Metairie compound

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

Celebrity Estates: Battle Over Inheritances

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

What happens to Debt when you die

What Happens to Debt when You Die?

What Happens to Debt when You Die?

When a person dies, it’s not unusual for them to leave behind some unpaid debt. What happens to that debt depends upon how their estate was organized, says the article “This is how your unpaid debts are handled if you pass away” from CNBC.com. The estate consists of whatever is owned, whether the person was wealthy or not. It includes financial accounts, real estate and personal possessions.

For surviving spouses, this can be worrisome. In most instances, they are not responsible for their spouse’s debt, but there are some exceptions. Here’s how it works.

Paying off all debts and then distributing the remaining assets is part of the probate process. Every state has its own laws regarding how long creditors have to make a claim against the estate. In some states, it’s a few months, in others it can last a few years. An estate planning attorney in your state will know how long the estate is vulnerable to creditors.

In most states, funeral expenses take priority, then the cost of administering the estate, followed by taxes and hospital and medical bills. However, not all assets are necessarily part of the estate, and this is where estate planning is important.

Life insurance policies, qualified retirement accounts and other assets with named beneficiaries go directly to the beneficiaries and do not pass through probate. The same goes for assets placed in trusts, as does jointly owned property, as long as it has been properly titled.

With the right planning, it is possible that an entire estate, including one that is insolvent, could be passed on to heirs outside of probate, leaving creditors high and dry. However, there are a handful of states that have “community property laws” that make debt more complicated.

The law in these states views both assets and certain debt accumulated during the marriage as being owned by both spouses, even if it is only in the decedent’s name. That includes debt like medical expenses or a mortgage. However, that’s not the final word. A well-structured letter with a copy of the death certificate can sometimes lead to the debt being discharged. During the probate process, the company holding the debt should be advised that the estate has little or no assets to cover the debt and ask that it be forgiven.

This does not apply to co-signing on a loan. Although the request can be made, it is not likely to be honored. Federal student loans are forgiven if the student dies, which seems a matter of kindness. Parent PLUS loans, which are loans taken out by parents to help pay for education, are usually discharged, if the student or parent dies.

Your estate planning attorney can help structure your estate to protect your surviving spouse and family members from creditors.

Reference: CNBC.com (July 31, 2020) “This is how your unpaid debts are handled if you pass away”

Read more related articles at:

What Happens to Credit Card Debt When You Die?

Who Is Responsible for Your Debt After Your Death?

Also, read one of our previous blogs at:

Does My Mom Have to Pay My Dad’s Credit Card Debt after He Dies?

Click here to check out our Master Class!

Kenny Rogers

Did ‘The Gambler’ Have Estate Planning?

Did ‘The Gambler’ Have Estate Planning?

An article from Wealth Advisor entitled “What Kenny Rogers Leaves Behind After Four Divorces And Restaurant Armageddon,” says that he was a hit machine, racking up an estimated $250 million through extensive touring, TV appearances, and constant radio play.

Rogers was a singer, songwriter, actor, record producer and entrepreneur.

He was elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2013 and charted more than 120 hit singles.  He topped the country and pop album charts for more than 200 individual weeks in the U.S. alone. He sold more than 100 million records worldwide during his lifetime, making him one of the best-selling music artists of all time.

However, Rogers may not have left a lot of that money behind. He built a 425-restaurant chain in the 1990s that should have been his retirement plan. However, those restaurants closed everywhere, except in Asia. He had no licensing fees for use of the name, so there’s no revenue for his heirs.

The issue is whether Rogers accumulated sufficient wealth in life to support the lifestyles of his family. He left a wife (his fifth) and five adult kids behind. Kenny paid out $60 million to settle his fourth divorce in 1993, which was half his fortune.

While it was a while after his commercial peak, he started working on a smaller scale and married again, raising his two youngest kids. Kenny continued to tour and record, but his health became an issue. He decided the 2017 tour would be his last— and he was forced to cancel that one as well.

Kenny most likely only had whatever cash he set aside in conventional investment accounts, working real estate and other retirement assets. It’s unclear how much that was, but it’s probably enough to keep his widow comfortable for the rest of her life. That’s another challenge with late marriages. Roger died at 81, and wife No. 5 is just 57.

So, in theory, she needs those assets to last another 40 years to maintain her lifestyle.

Reference: Wealth Advisor (March 23, 2020) “What Kenny Rogers Leaves Behind After Four Divorces And Restaurant Armageddon”

Read more related articles at :

What Kenny Rogers Leaves Behind After Four Divorces And Restaurant Armageddon

Kenny Rogers’ Net Worth: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

Also, read one of our previous blogs at:

Did Little Richard Have a Smart Estate Plan?

Click here to check out our Master Class!

LLC for Estate Planning

Should I Create an LLC for Estate Planning?

Should I Create an LLC for Estate Planning?

If you want to transfer assets to your children, grandchildren or other family members but are worried about gift taxes or the weight of estate taxes your beneficiaries will owe upon your death, a LLC can help you control and protect assets during your lifetime, keep assets in the family and lessen taxes owed by you or your family members.

Investopedia’s article entitled “Using an LLC for Estate Planning” explains that a LLC is a legal entity in which its owners (called members) are protected from personal liability in case of debt, lawsuit, or other claims. This shields a member’s personal assets, like a home, automobile, personal bank account or investments.

Creating a family LLC with your children lets you effectively reduce the estate taxes your children would be required to pay on their inheritance. A LLC also lets you distribute that inheritance to your children during your lifetime, without as much in gift taxes. You can also have the ability to maintain control over your assets.

In a family LLC, the parents maintain management of the LLC, and the children or grandchildren hold shares in the LLC’s assets. However, they don’t have management or voting rights. This lets the parents purchase, sell, trade, or distribute the LLC’s assets, while the other members are restricted in their ability to sell their LLC shares, withdraw from the company, or transfer their membership in the company. Therefore, the parents keep control over the assets and can protect them from financial decisions made by younger members. Gifts of shares to younger members do come with gift taxes. However, there are significant tax benefits that let you give more, and lower the value of your estate.

As far as tax benefits, if you’re the manager of the LLC, and your children are non-managing members, the value of units transferred to them can be discounted quite steeply—frequently up to 40% of their market value—based on the fact that without management rights, LLC units become less marketable.

Your children can now get an advance on their inheritance, but at a lower tax burden than they otherwise would’ve had to pay on their personal income taxes. The overall value of your estate is reduced, which means that there is an eventual lower estate tax when you die. The ability to discount the value of units transferred to your children, also permits you to give them gifts of discounted LLC units. That lets you to gift beyond the current $15,000 gift limit, without having to pay a gift tax.

You can give significant gifts without gift taxes, and at the same time reduce the value of your estate and lower the eventual estate tax your heirs will face.

Speak to an experienced estate planning attorney about a family LLC, since estate planning is already complex. LLC planning can be even more complex and subject you to heightened IRS scrutiny. The regulations governing LLCs vary from state to state and evolve over time. In short, a family LLC is certainly not for everyone and it appropriately should be vetted thoroughly before creating one.

Reference: Investopedia (Oct. 25, 2019) “Using an LLC for Estate Planning”

Read more related articles at: 

How Limited Liability Companies Can Help with Estate Planning

LLC: The Estate Planning Tool

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at :

Small Business Owners Need Business Succession and Estate Planning

Click here to check out our Master Class!

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