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Power of Attorney

The Second Most Powerful Estate Planning Document: Power of Attorney

The Second Most Powerful Estate Planning Document: Power of Attorney.  All too often, people wait until it’s too late to execute a power of attorney. It’s uncomfortable to think about giving someone full access to our finances, while we are still competent. However, a power of attorney can be created that is fully exercisable only when needed, according to a useful article “Power of attorney can be tailored to circumstances” from The News-Enterprise. Some estate planning attorneys believe that the power of attorney, or POA, is actually the second most important estate planning document after a will. Here’s what a POA can do for you.

The term POA is a reference to the document, but it also is used to refer to the person named as the agent in the document.

Generally speaking, any POA creates a fiduciary relationship, for either legal or financial purposes. A Medical or Healthcare POA creates a relationship for healthcare decisions. Sometimes these are for a specific purpose or for a specific period of time. However, a Durable POA is created to last until death or until it is revoked. It can be created to cover a wide array of needs.

Here’s the critical fact: a POA of any kind needs to be executed, that is, agreed to and signed by a person who is competent to make legal decisions. The problem occurs when family members or spouse do not realize they need a POA, until their loved one is not legally competent and does not understand what they are signing.

Incompetent or incapacitated individuals may not sign legal documents. Further, the law protects people from improperly signing, by requiring two witnesses to observe the individual signing.

The law does allow those with limited competency to sign estate planning documents, so long as they are in a moment of lucidity at the time of the signing. However, this is tricky and can be dangerous, as legal issues may be raised for all involved, if capacity is challenged later on.

If someone has become incompetent and has not executed a valid power of attorney, a loved one will need to apply for guardianship. This is a court process that is expensive, takes several months and leads to the court being involved in many aspects of the person’s life. The basics of this process: three professionals are needed to personally assess the “respondent,” the person who is said to be incompetent. The respondent loses all rights to make decisions of any kind for themselves. They also lose the right to vote.

A power of attorney can be executed quickly and does not require the person to lose any rights.

The biggest concern to executing a power of attorney, is that the person is giving an agent the control of their money and property. This is true, but the POA can be created so that it does not hand over this control immediately.

This is where the “springing” power of attorney comes in. Springing POA means that the document, while executed immediately, does not become effective for use by the agent, until a certain condition is met. The document can be written that the POA becomes in effect, if the person is deemed mentally incompetent by a doctor. The springing clause gives the agent the power to act if and when it is necessary for someone else to take over the individual’s affairs.

Having an estate planning attorney create the power of attorney that is best suited for each individual’s situation is the most sensible way to provide the protection of a POA, without worrying about giving up control while one is competent.

Reference: The News-Enterprise (Feb. 24, 2020) “Power of attorney can be tailored to circumstances”

Read More About this subject at:

9 Things You Need To Know About Power Of Attorney/Forbes

Power of Attorney/AmericanBarAssociation

Also read our previous Blogs at:

Why Do I Need a Power of Attorney?

C19 UPDATE: If You Have Not Yet Named Someone with Medical Power of Attorney, Do It Now

What Is the VA’s Plan for Long-Term Care for Baby Boomers?

What Is the VA’s Plan for Long-Term Care for Baby Boomers?  Teresa Boyd, Assistant Deputy Undersecretary for Health at the Veterans Health Administration recently told House Veterans Affairs Subcommittee on Health members they would have to wait another few weeks before the VA’s “Elderly Strategic Plan” will be ready for release. Even so, lawmakers asked the VHA official about issues found in a recent Government Accountability Office report.

Military.com’s recent article entitled “Lawmakers Scrutinize VA’s Plans to Provide Long-Term Care for Aging Baby Boomers” reports that there are currently about 3.2 million veterans aged 65 years or older using VA health care services. The GAO found that the VA anticipates the amount of long-term care provided to veterans with service-connected disabilities will increase by 18% from fiscal 2017 to 2037, plus another 5% to provide the services to post-9/11 veterans.

The government watchdog report identified three issues facing the VA, as it prepares for a generation of aging Baby Boomers:

  1. Staffing shortages
  2. Access to specialized providers; and
  3. Trouble getting to vets in rural areas.

Boyd said that the VA’s plan will address the concerns listed by the GAO.

Despite the VA’s ongoing improvements to scholarship and student loan payback programs to attract more staff, Representative Conor Lamb, D-Pennsylvania, wasn’t as optimistic. He’s concerned the current administration’s actions against VA unions will detract those the VA is trying to court. The Trump administration had cut a type of pay union representatives receive, while pursuing grievances on behalf of bargaining units and requiring union staff to pay for office space.

“The type of people who are going to take a home health aide or assistance job are often the people who need that sort of protection and support the most,” he said. “And I think for us to recruit the best of the best in that category for the next generation, you want the people who are already there telling their friends, ‘Hey, VA’s a great place to work. They stick up for us; they pay us well; they take care of our needs if we get sick … ‘”

Lamb asked the VA to consider this, as it looks at the obstacles found in the GAO report.

Meanwhile, Brownley and other lawmakers advocated for more investments in the VA’s in-home, long-term care programs.

“In recent years, stakeholders have largely focused on VA’s community care and caregiver programs. While these are essential areas for VA to get right, the scale of the silver tsunami is something VA cannot afford to get wrong,” Brownley said. “Millions of veterans and their families are relying on us to ensure their later years are as dignified and healthy as possible.”

Boyd agreed that many seniors want to remain in their own homes as long as possible, rather than moving to a facility for their long-term care. Boyd reported that the results of one of the VA’s in-home programs, Choose Home, have played a role in developing the strategic plan to be released in the next few weeks.

Reference: military.com (March 9, 2020) “Lawmakers Scrutinize VA’s Plans to Provide Long-Term Care for Aging Baby Boomers”

Check out more related articles at :

The 2030 Problem: Caring for Aging Baby Boomers

Long-term Care Planning for Baby Boomers: Addressing an Uncertain Future

You can also read one of our previous Blogs at :

Do I Need Long-Term Care and Why?

POA COVID

C19 UPDATE: If You Have Not Yet Named Someone with Medical Power of Attorney, Do It Now

C19 UPDATE: If You Have Not Yet Named Someone with Medical Power of Attorney, Do It Now!  Stop procrastinating and get this crucial planning in place now.

What is a Medical Power of Attorney?

A medical power of attorney is a legal document you use to give someone else authority to make medical decisions for you when you can no longer make them yourself.  This person, also known as an agent, can only exercise this power if your doctor says you are unable to make key decisions yourself.

Other Terms for Medical Power of Attorney

Depending on the state where you live, the medical power of attorney may be called something else. You may have seen this referred to as a health care power of attorney, an advance directive, advance health care directive, a durable power of attorney for health care, etc. There are many variations, but they all mean fundamentally the same thing.

Be aware that each state has their own laws about medical powers of attorney, so it’s important to work with a qualified estate planning attorney to ensure your decisions will be enforced through legally binding documents. Also, some states may not honor documents from other states, so even if you made these decisions and created documents in another state, it’s wise to review with an estate attorney to ensure they are legally valid in your state now.

What Can My Medical Agent Do for Me?    What Is a Health Care Agent?

Just like there are many different terms for the medical power of attorney, there also are different terms for the medical agent – this person may be referred to as an attorney-in-fact, a health proxy, or surrogate.

Some of the things a medical POA authorizes your agent to decide for you:

  • Which doctors or facilities to work with and whether to change
  • Give consent for additional testing or treatment
  • How aggressively to treat
  • Whether to disconnect life support

We are ready to help walk you through these decisions, understand the ramifications of your choices, and memorialize your plans in binding legal documents. We are currently offering no-contact initial conferences remotely if you prefer. Book a call now and let us help you make the right choices for yourself and your loved ones.

Read other related articles at :  Power of Attorney/AmericanBarAssociaton

Powers of Attorney: Crucial Documents for Caregiving

Also view our previous Posts at : 

What to Know About a Power of Attorney?

Why Is a Power of Attorney Important?

What is the Difference between Guardianship and Power of Attorney?

What is the Difference between Guardianship and Power of Attorney? Protecting yourself or a loved one can take many different forms, since aging takes a toll on the ability to handle financial and medical decisions. In most situations, guardianship or a power of attorney does the trick, says the article “Guardianships vs. Powers of Attorney” from the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.  How to know which is the best one to use?

A guardianship is a court-authorized assignment of surrogate decision-making power for the benefit of a person who has lost the ability to make informed decisions on their own, often described as a person who has become incapacitated. The decisions that another person can make on their behalf can be very broad, or they can be very specific.

If a person becomes incapacitated, either through a slowly progressing illness like dementia or quickly, as the result of an accident, a judge will appoint a person or sometimes an organization to handle health care and financial decisions. The court-appointed guardian or organization could be a person or agency you have never heard of and would not know your family or anything about you.

Yes, that is scary. However, guardianship takes place when families do not plan in advance to appoint a surrogate decision maker, also known as an “agent.”

Here’s even more scary news: once the court has appointed a guardian, that relationship may continue for the rest of the incapacitated person’s life. That means annual accountings and involvement with the court, legal fees and other professional fees the guardian or court deems necessary.

There are some guardians who have made headlines for stealing money and making care decisions that the individual and their families did not want.

Meeting with an estate planning attorney to prepare for incapacity as part of an overall estate plan is a far better way. Why don’t more people do it?

  • They aren’t aware of the importance of power of attorney.
  • They don’t want to spend the money.
  • They don’t know who to choose as their power of attorney
  • They don’t want to think about incapacity or death.

In contrast to a court-supervised lifetime guardianship, a properly drafted power of attorney can provide for an agent to make a variety of financial and medical decisions. The person named as a power of attorney (the agent) can serve for the person’s lifetime, just like a guardian.

This is the most fundamental estate planning document, after the last will and testament. Once it’s prepared, you can always change your mind and you or your agent never need to go to court. Hopefully this shed some light  on what the difference between a Guardianship and a Power of Attorney is.

Reference: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Feb. 24, 2020) “Guardianships vs. Powers of Attorney”

Read other articles pertaining to this subject at : THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN POWERS  OF ATTORNEY AND GUARDIANSHIPS/AARP

                                                                                                          Power of attorney and guardianship: What’s the difference?/care.com

You can also read some of our previous Blogs at :

Will Florida’s New Legislation Help Seniors in Guardianships?

When Do I Need a Power of Attorney?

COVID 19 AND SMALL BUSINESSES

C19 UPDATE: Small Businesses Hurt by COVID-19 May Qualify for SBA Disaster Relief Loans

C19 UPDATE: Small Businesses Hurt by COVID-19 May Qualify for SBA Disaster Relief Loans.  It’s estimated that some 30 million US small businesses may fall victim to the coronavirus through closures, cancellations and other revenue losses. With no clear end in sight, the Small Business Administration (SBA) is offering eligible businesses low-interest disaster relief loans to cover operating expenses.

These loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that can’t be paid because of the disaster’s impact. The interest rate is 3.75% for small businesses. The interest rate for non-profits is 2.75%. In order to keep payments affordable, they are offering long-term repayments, up to a maximum of 30 years. Terms are determined on a case-by-case basis, based upon each borrower’s ability to repay.

The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering designated states and territories low-interest federal disaster loans for working capital to small businesses suffering substantial economic injury as a result of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). Upon a request received from a state’s or territory’s Governor, SBA will issue under its own authority, as provided by the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act that was recently signed by the President, an Economic Injury Disaster Loan declaration.

For more information on areas currently eligible for SBA disaster relief and to apply for a loan, visit the SBA website at https://www.sba.gov/disaster-assistance/coronavirus-covid-19 or call the SBA disaster assistance customer service center at 1-800-659-2955 (TTY: 1-800-877-8339) or e-mail  disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.

Resources: SBA Disaster Assistance in Response to the Coronavirus.

Read Related Articles at :

SBA to Provide Disaster Assistance Loans for Small Businesses Impacted by Coronavirus (COVID-19)

SBA Updates Criteria on States for Requesting Disaster Assistance Loans for Small Businesses Impacted by Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Also read one of our previous Blogs at:

C19 UPDATE: Paying for Covid-19 Testing and Treatment if You Have a High Deductible Insurance Plan

C19 UPDATE: Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now

Alzheimer’s

New Blood Test May Make Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Easier

New Blood Test May Make Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Easier.  Researchers at the University of California – UC San Francisco have analyzed the blood test in more than 300 patients and believe that they will see such a test available in doctor’s offices within five years, according to a press release from The University of California- San Francisco’s entitled “New Blood Test Could Make Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Easier Than Ever.”

“This test could eventually be deployed in a primary care setting for people with memory concerns to identify who should be referred to specialized centers to participate in clinical trials or to be treated with new Alzheimer’s therapies, once they are approved,” said Adam Boxer, MD, PhD, neurologist at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center and senior author of the study published in Nature Medicine. Boxer also is affiliated with the UCSF Weill Institute for Neurosciences.

There is currently no blood test for either condition. Alzheimer’s diagnoses can only be confirmed by a PET scan of the brain, which can be expensive or an invasive lumbar puncture to test cerebrospinal fluid.

If approved, the new blood test could make screening easier and help increase the number of patients eligible for clinical trials—vital to the search for drugs to stop or slow dementia. Patients who know whether they have Alzheimer’s or FTD are also better able to manage their symptoms.

In the new study, scientists collected blood samples from 362 people aged 58 to 70, including 56 individuals who’d been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, 190 diagnosed with FTD, 47 with mild cognitive impairment, plus 69 healthy controls.

Researchers checked the blood samples for proteins that could serve as signs of dementia. One protein, called pTau181, is known to aggregate in tangles in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s. Blood levels of pTau181 were about 3½ times higher in people with Alzheimer’s as opposed to their healthy peers. People with FTD had normal levels of pTau181, and those with mild cognitive impairment due to underlying Alzheimer’s had an intermediate increase.

When researchers followed the patients for two years, they saw that higher levels of pTau181 predicted more rapid cognitive decline in those with Alzheimer’s or mild cognitive impairment.

The researchers note the new blood test has the same degree of accuracy as current PET scans and lumbar punctures in distinguishing Alzheimer’s from FTD. It would be less expensive and easier.

Alzheimer’s impacts nearly 6 million Americans and comprises two-thirds of dementia cases. FTD includes a broad group of brain disorders often linked with degeneration of the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. So this New Blood Test May Make Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Easier.

Reference: UCSF (March 2, 2020) “New Blood Test Could Make Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Easier Than Ever”

Read more related articles at: 

Simple Blood Test May be Able to Diagnose Alzheimer’s Disease

Blood test is highly accurate at identifying Alzheimer’s before symptoms arise

How to Pay for a Loved One’s Memory Care and Manage Their Finances

Also read our previous Blogs at: 

How Do I Prepare my Parents for Alzheimer’s?

How Do We Live Our Lives When A Loved One Has Alzheimer’s?

 

 

 

Grandparents and Family

Can an Elder Law Attorney Help My Family?

Can an Elder Law Attorney Help My Family?  The right elder law attorney can counsel a family through the difficult details and requirements of the situations that may come up to protect the rights and welfare of seniors and their families. An elder law attorney may help with issues, such as guardianship, conservatorship, power of attorney, estate planning, Medicaid planning, probate and estate administration and advanced directives.

The Senior List’s recent article entitled “What is Elder Law and How Can an Elder Law Attorney Help Me?” explains that because the laws on the care of the elderly differ in each state, and are always subject to change, it is essential to find an elder law attorney who is skilled, knowledgeable and up-to-date on elder law policy and legal issues.

Before meeting with an elder law attorney, create a list of the specific concerns for the present and foreseeable future, so you know what qualifications and capabilities your attorney will need. You want a lawyer who’s experienced and educated, as well as comfortable to speak with and relatable.

You can ask these questions of your elder law attorney to help you make your decision:

  • How long have you been practicing in elder law?
  • Do you stay up to date on this area of law, by ongoing study and attending seminars on this subject matter?
  • Take a look at the required services we think will be needed. Can you fulfill them?
  • Do you have litigation experience?
  • What type of fee schedule do you offer?

If you’d like to try to stay up to date on what’s happening within elder law, go online and search for “aging and disability” as well as the name of the state in which the senior lives. Every state government has a department in charge of these matters (the official names will vary).

While caring for a love done can be stressful, understanding what options are available to them and to you, can make it all much easier. This is why it is good to know if  an Elder Law Attorney Can Help My Family?

Reference: The Senior List (Oct. 10, 2019) “What is Elder Law and How Can an Elder Law Attorney Help Me?”

Read More related to this topic at :    Why elder law is a growing, ‘anything-can-happen practice’

 What Does An Elder Law Attorney Do?

Also read some of our previous Blogs at:      When Do I Need an Elder Law Attorney?

 Caring for Your Aging Parents – An Elder Law Attorney’s Top 5 Questions and Answers

Ozzy and Sharon estate Plan

Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne Have an Estate Plan

Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne Have an Estate Plan.  Heavy metal rock star Ozzy Osbourne and his talk show host wife, Sharon Osbourne say that they have a plan to pass the lion’s share of their estate to their children.

Ozzy rose to fame during the 1970s as the lead vocalist of the heavy metal band Black Sabbath, and Sharon became a household name more recently, thanks to her role in the MTV reality show “The Osbournes” and her job as a daytime talk show host.

Sharon explained the couple’s plan on The Talk, while reacting to news that the late Kirk Douglas bequeathed most of his $80 million fortune to charity when he died in February 2020 at age 103, reports I Heart Radio’s recent article entitled “Ozzy, Sharon Osbourne’s Children Will Determine The Fate Of Their Fortune.”

“Everybody is different,” Sharon said. “And I just know that my husband’s body of work, that he’s written, and kept us all in the lifestyle that we love, goes to my children.”

The children will also be entrusted with determining what will happen to Ozzy’s image and likeness, Sharon also said.

“I don’t want someone that never met my husband owning his name and likeness and selling T-shirts everywhere and whatever. No, it stays in the Osbourne family.”

Ozzy’s latest solo album, Ordinary Man—which is his 12th overall—already ranks as his highest-charting solo debut ever in the United Kingdom.

Between Ozzy’s equity in Black Sabbath, the solo recordings that he and Sharon have worked so hard to control and the hours of television in which the two have starred, it’s not hard to see the fruits of the couple’s labor benefitting several future generations of Osbournes.

Estate planning is important in every field and for everyone. However, it’s particularly important in the entertainment business, where will contests and questions about inheritances frequently are publicized in the press. To that end, the estates of celebrated artists like Frank Zappa, Kurt Cobain, Prince, Tom Petty, Chris Cornell and many others have been the subject of public battles in recent years.

Even if you are not about to release your latest solo album, you still need to work with an experienced estate planning attorney to make certain that your plans for your assets and property are carried out after your death.  That probably is why Ozzy Osbourne and Sharon Osbourne Have an Estate Plan.

Reference: I Heart Radio (March 2, 2020) “Ozzy, Sharon Osbourne’s Children Will Determine The Fate Of Their Fortune”

Read more about this at:    OZZY OSBOURNE Will Leave His ‘Body Of Work’ To His Children, Says SHARON OSBOURNE

Also this might be interesting :   15 Kids Who Won’t Inherit A Dime From Their Celeb Parents (And 5 Who Are Already Millionaires)

Read about other Celebrities and their Estate planning from one of our previous Blogs: The Latest on Kirk Douglas’ Estate

How Can Celebrities’ Estate Planning Be Impacted by Alzheimer’s?

COVID

C19 UPDATE: Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now

C19 UPDATE: Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now.

Though it may be hard not to panic when the grocery store shelves are empty, the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 keeps rising, and we see sobering statistics across the globe … we will not overcome this challenge with a panicked response.

Nonetheless, there are certain things we all need to be doing right now – and your public health officials are the best resource on how to stay personally safe and help prevent the virus from spreading. In fact, a March 16, 2020 Kiplinger article notes that the current crisis is serving as a wake-up call for many people to meet with their estate planning lawyer and get their estate plan in order.

When it comes to the seriousness of this outbreak, however, there also are some critical estate planning decisions you should make – or review – right now.

Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Who will make medical decisions for me should I become severely ill and unable to make these decisions myself?
  2. Who will make my financial decisions in that same situation — for example, who will be authorized to sign my income tax return, write checks or pay my bills online?
  3. Who is authorized to take care of my minor children in the event of my severe illness? What decisions are they authorized to make? How will they absorb the financial burden?
  4. If the unthinkable happens – what arrangements have I made for the care of my minor children, any family members with special needs, my pets or other vulnerable loved ones?
  5. How will my business continue if I were to become seriously ill and unable to work, even remotely … or in the event of my death?

These are the most personal decisions to make right now to protect yourself and your loved ones during this emergency. Now is also a good time to ask yourself if you have plans in place for the smooth transfer of your assets and preservation of your legacy.

We are ready to help walk you through these decisions, understand the ramifications of your choices, and memorialize your plans in binding legal documents. We are currently offering no-contact initial conferences remotely if you prefer. Book a call now and let us help you make the right choices for yourself and your loved ones. We can help you with Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now!

Check out these related articles:     

Trump declares coronavirus outbreak a national emergency/ Washingtonpost

Coronavirus Legal Advice: Get Your Business and Estate in Order Now

Also read one of our previous Blogs:         Health Crisis Strikes, Do you have a plan?

Medicare premiums

Can I Appeal More Expensive Medicare Premiums?

Can I Appeal More Expensive Medicare Premiums?  The standard monthly premium for Medicare Part B is $144.60 in 2020, but some beneficiaries pay as much as $491.60. If your income varies from what the Social Security used to calculate whether you’re subject to those surcharges, there is a way to request the agency to reconsider.

CNBC’s recent article entitled “Here’s how to appeal higher Medicare premiums” explains that the annual income of older Americans could decrease substantially from one year to the next for many reasons, such as retirement, the death of a spouse, or the sale of your business. However, it can take Medicare — which charges higher earners more for premiums — several years to adjust when your income drops below the threshold.

If you’re paying more than the standard premiums for Medicare Part B (outpatient services) and Part D (prescription drugs) through income-related monthly adjustment amounts, or IRMAAs, the difference can mean hundreds of dollars per month. The surcharge is also frequently derived from your tax return from two years before, which may not accurately reflect your current financial situation. When this happens, seniors must contact Social Security and prove that they’re not earning that amount any longer.

For individuals, IRMAAs are triggered if your modified adjusted gross income is greater than $87,000, and for married couples filing joint tax returns, IRMAAs begin above $174,000.

The process to show that your current income is lower, requires you to ask the agency to reconsider its assessment. You also have to complete a form and attach supporting documents. Everyone’s situation is different, but in many cases, suitable proof may include a more recent tax return, a letter from your former employer stating that you retired, more recent pay stubs or something similar showing that your income has dropped.

The form includes a list of “life-changing” events that qualify as reasons for reducing or eliminating the IRMAAs. These include marriage, the death of a spouse, divorce, the loss of pension, or that you stopped working or reduced your hours. If you satisfy one of the qualifying reasons, it usually gets adjusted. If it doesn’t, you can appeal the decision to an administrative law judge. However, that process can be time consuming and you must keep paying the surcharges in the meantime.

The SSA reevaluates your situation every year. This means the IRMAAs (or whether you pay them) could change annually, based upon the volatility of your income.

You should also be aware that the SSA’s decision could leave you financially vulnerable, if your long-term health unexpectedly changes or a one-time health event requires prescription drugs. You also could be hit with late-enrollment penalties, if you don’t qualify for an exception. The same is true for enrolling late in Part B. This should help explain if you can  Appeal More Expensive Medicare Premiums?

Reference: CNBC (February 25, 2020) “Here’s how to appeal higher Medicare premiums”

Read more about this at :         Medicare perscription drug coverage appeals/medicare.gov

                                                               Medicare part B Premium Appeals/HHS.gov

You can also read one of our previous Blogs at :  The High Cost of Medicare Mistakes

 

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