Legacy Planning Law Group
Weekly Blog

Estate & Elder Law

Protect Your Family. Preserve Your Legacy

If you’re interested in learning more about our process and the solution for you and your family, please book your free 15-minute call with us today!

Robert Redford

Did Robert Redford Have a Business Exit Plan?

Did Robert Redford Have a Business Exit Plan?

Motley Fool’s recent article titled “What Robert Redford’s Sale of Sundance Can Teach Investors About Exit Planning” says that, in announcing the sale, Redford told the Salt Lake Tribune that he’s been thinking of selling for several years. However, he wanted to find the right partners. Broadreach and Cedar plan to upgrade the resort, add hotel rooms and build a new inn. The companies have also said that they will keep the resort sustainable and practicing measured growth, as well as also continuing to host the Sundance Film Festival.

The 2,600-acre resort has 1,845 acres of land saved from future development through a conservation easement and protective covenants. The 84-year-old actor has had a lifelong interest in the environment and in land stewardship. Redford and his family have also arranged with Utah Open Lands to create the Redford Family Elk Meadows Preserve at the base of Mt. Timpanogos. The gift will reduce Redford’s tax liability on his estate.

Both Broadreach and Cedar have extensive hospitality experience, but neither looks to have much ski resort experience. However, they’re working with Bill Jensen, an industry legend, who recently left his role as CEO of Telluride Ski and Golf Resort in Colorado.

Business exit and succession planning can be difficult—in part, because people don’t like to address such unwelcome topics. Most investors don’t have the luxury of waiting years to find the right buyer, but the Redford deal does show that planning ahead may be critical to creating a mechanism that supports the vision for the property.

When selling a large investment property, you must first understand why you’re selling, and your desired end result. Of course, a return on investment is nice, but there may be other considerations, like in Redford’s case. Another key is ascertaining the updated worth of what you’re selling. Get a valuation, especially with an irreplaceable asset.

The structure of the sale is important. You will likely be liable for tax on your capital gains, so ask an attorney. If you’re also structuring your estate plans at the same time, you’ll need to know what amount you can give and what your heirs may have to pay. Talk to an experienced estate planning attorney to be certain that you’re covering all the bases.

Reference: Motley Fool (Dec. 12, 2020) “What Robert Redford’s Sale of Sundance Can Teach Investors About Exit Planning”

Read more related articles at:

How Can I Easily Pass My Home to My Only Child?

How Can I Easily Pass My Home to My Only Child?

This estate planning issue concerns a single retired parent of an only adult daughter and how to transfer the home to the daughter. Should the daughter simply sell the house when her mother dies, or should the daughter be added to the deed now while her mother is alive?

Also, is there a court hearing?

In many states, there is no reason or requirement to go before a judge to probate your estate, says nj.com in its recent article “Should I add my daughter’s name to my home’s deed?”

In estate planning, there are two primary questions to answer about the transfer of the home. First, there would possibly be some significant capital gains if the mom adds her daughter to the deed prior to death.

Also, if the mother winds up requiring Medicaid, Medicaid might put a lien against the home after she dies for the value of the services it provided.

Generally, when a home has been owned for a long time, the mother should try to preserve the step-up in basis for tax purposes that happens, if the real estate is still in the mom’s name at her passing.

Whether that step up is preserved, depends on how the daughter is added to the deed.

Adding the daughter as a joint tenant or tenant in common won’t preserve the step-up basis for taxes. Ask an elder law attorney what this means in your specific situation.

A better option may be to transfer the remainder interest in the property to the daughter in this scenario and withhold a life estate for the mom.

That will preserve the step-up in basis at death.

This can also get complicated when there’s an outstanding mortgage, so speak to an experienced elder law or estate planning attorney.

Reference: nj.com (Dec. 15, 2020) “Should I add my daughter’s name to my home’s deed?”

Read more related articles here:

Four ways to pass down your family home to your children

How to Pass Your Home to Your Children Tax-Free

Also, read one of our previous blogs at:

Is Transferring House to Children a Good Idea?

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

 

Vietnam Vets

Will Vietnam Vets with Serious Illnesses Get Presumptive Benefit Status in the Defense Budget Bill?

Will Vietnam Vets with Serious Illnesses Get Presumptive Benefit Status in the Defense Budget Bill?

 

Will Vietnam Vets with Serious Illnesses Get Presumptive Benefit Status in the Defense Budget Bill? If passed into law, the requirement would have the VA start granting fast-track disability status for roughly 34,000 veterans suffering from the three conditions. It would also be a major victory for veterans advocates, who have pushed for the change for many years.

Military Times’ recent article entitled “Vietnam veterans with bladder cancer, other serious illnesses would get presumptive benefit status in final defense budget bill” reports that the policy bill still faces a veto threat from President Trump on some unrelated issues.

VA officials have resisted the action to grant presumptive benefits status in recent years, while they conduct additional scientific research into the connection between the illnesses and exposure to chemical defoliants during the Vietnam War. Internal documents also show disagreements within the Trump administration over adding new Agent Orange-connected diseases.

Earlier research from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine linked the medical problems to Agent Orange exposure. However, Office of Management and Budget officials have questioned the validity of those findings, in light of the potential expense of new disability payouts.

House Armed Services Committee Chairman Adam Smith said the new veterans’ benefit was a win on “an extremely important issue.”

“The VA, I think, has been unfairly treating this issue for years and denying people coverage that they ought to have, saying things that can clearly be linked to Agent Orange exposure were not,” he said in an interview Wednesday.

“This will give people the coverage that they deserve, for what happened with Agent Orange exposure, and I think that’s huge.”

The issue of presumptive benefits status has been controversial in the veteran community for a long time. In most instances, veterans must prove (usually with a medical exams and service records) that their injuries and illnesses are associated with their service to receive disability benefits. However, in conflicts like Vietnam, where the chemical defoliant Agent Orange was used across the country with little clear record of when U.S. troops were exposed, the federal government has made exceptions to the standards of proof.

Now, those vets who served in the country and later suffered a series of 14 illnesses known to be connected to the chemical exposure receive presumptive exposure status and need not provide additional documentation to apply for benefits.

The new legislation will help roughly 34,000 vets who aren’t currently receiving full disability payouts. That will cost about $8 billion over the next 10 years.

President Trump has threatened to veto the bill because of provisions to rename bases honoring Confederate leaders, calling it an attack on U.S. military history. Nonetheless, lawmakers included the provision in their final draft. He also insisted on language in the authorization bill repealing legal protections for social media companies, since their conduct has become a national security issue. However, legislators rejected that notion. They said it was not relevant to the military budget measure and because it was not included in the separate drafts adopted in the House and Senate earlier this year.

Reference: Military Times (Dec. 2, 2020) “Vietnam veterans with bladder cancer, other serious illnesses would get presumptive benefit status in final defense budget bill”

Read More related articles at:

Vietnam veterans with bladder cancer, other serious illnesses would get presumptive benefit status in final defense budget bill

Defense Bill Would Add 3 New Diseases to Agent Orange Presumptive Conditions List

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

What Are the New Rules for Veterans’ Benefits?

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

COVID vaccine

What are Most Common Side Effects of COVID-19 Vaccines?

What are Most Common Side Effects of COVID-19 Vaccines?

AARP’s recent article entitled “What Are the Side Effects of COVID-19 Vaccines?” reports that the FDA says the most common side effects among participants in both the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna Phase 3 clinical trials were the following:

  • Injection site pain
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Chills
  • Joint pain; and
  • Fever.

These reactions are temporary and will “self-resolve” within a few days.

Side effects from vaccines aren’t uncommon. For example, the seasonal flu shot can cause fever and fatigue, or reactions.

Doctors say that a mild to moderate reaction is a good thing because it shows that the immune system is responding to the vaccine. However, the key, experts say, is temporary discomfort versus the long-term benefits of a potentially high level of protection from COVID-19, a disease that’s responsible for the deaths of more than 1.6 million people globally.

Federal analyses of both vaccine trials show that few adverse events, which the CDC defines as any health problem that happens after a shot (separate from the less serious side effects), were reported. There have been a few people who’ve reported severe allergic reactions — known as anaphylaxis —after receiving the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. As a result, the CDC is recommending that anyone who has ever had a severe allergic reaction to any ingredient in a COVID-19 vaccine not get it. The ingredients of authorized vaccines are on the FDA’s website. Talk to your doctor, if you have questions and keep in mind that serious reactions are relatively rare.

People must continue their prevention efforts to help slow the spread of the disease: mask wearing, social distancing and frequent handwashing. Note that it typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity to a disease after vaccination, so it’s possible you can get sick with COVID-19 even after you’ve been vaccinated. Experts also aren’t certain if the vaccines also block transmission of the virus.

Remember that it takes time to build up herd immunity, where enough of the population is protected from the virus that transmission slows significantly. Scientists aren’t sure what the magic number is to obtain herd immunity for COVID-19, but they think it’s around 70% of the population, which could take months to achieve through vaccination.

Reference: AARP (Dec. 21, 2020) “What Are the Side Effects of COVID-19 Vaccines?”

Read more related articles at:

What to Expect after Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine

Not Sure About the COVID-19 Vaccine? Get the Facts, Then Decide

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

The Most Common Myths about COVID Vaccine

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

 

Special Needs and the Secure Act

SECURE Act has Changed Special Needs Planning

SECURE Act has Changed Special Needs Planning

The SECURE Act eliminated the life expectancy payout for inherited IRAs for most people, but it also preserved the life expectancy option for five classes of eligible beneficiaries, referred to as “EDBs” in a recent article from Morningstar.com titled “Providing for Disabled Beneficiaries After the SECURE Act.” Two categories that are considered EDBs are disabled individuals and chronically ill individuals. Estate planning needs to be structured to take advantage of this option.

The first step is to determine if the individual would be considered disabled or chronically ill within the specific definition of the SECURE Act, which uses almost the same definition as that used by the Social Security Administration to determine eligibility for SS disability benefits.

A person is deemed to be “chronically ill” if they are unable to perform at least two activities of daily living or if they require substantial supervision because of cognitive impairment. A licensed healthcare practitioner certifies this status, typically used when a person enters a nursing home and files a long-term health insurance claim.

However, if the disabled or ill person receives any kind of medical care, subsidized housing or benefits under Medicaid or any government programs that are means-tested, an inheritance will disqualify them from receiving these benefits. They will typically need to spend down the inheritance (or have a court authorized trust created to hold the inheritance), which is likely not what the IRA owner had in mind.

Typically, a family member wishing to leave an inheritance to a disabled person leaves the inheritance to a Supplemental Needs Trust or SNT. This allows the individual to continue to receive benefits but can pay for things not covered by the programs, like eyeglasses, dental care, or vacations. However, does the SNT receive the same life expectancy payout treatment as an IRA?

Thanks to a special provision in the SECURE Act that applies only to the disabled and the chronically ill, a SNT that pays nothing to anyone other than the EDB can use the life expectancy payout. The SECURE Act calls this trust an “Applicable Multi-Beneficiary Trust,” or AMBT.

For other types of EDB, like a surviving spouse, the individual must be named either as the sole beneficiary or, if a trust is used, must be the sole beneficiary of a conduit trust to qualify for the life expectancy payout. Under a conduit trust, all distributions from the inherited IRA or other retirement plan must be paid out to the individual more or less as received during their lifetime. However, the SECURE Act removes that requirement for trusts created for the disabled or chronically ill.

However, not all of the SECURE Act’s impact on special needs planning is smooth sailing. The AMBT must provide that nothing may be paid from the trust to anyone but the disabled individual while they are living. What if the required minimum distribution from the inheritance is higher than what the beneficiary needs for any given year? Let’s say the trustee must withdraw an RMD of $60,000, but the disabled person’s needs are only $20,000? The trust is left with $40,000 of gross income, and there is nowhere for the balance of the gross income to go.

In the past, SNTs included a provision that allowed the trustee to pass excess income to other family members and deduct the amount as distributable net income, shifting the tax liability to family members who might be in a lower tax bracket than the trust.

Special Needs Planning under the SECURE Act has raised this and other issues, which can be addressed by an experienced estate planning attorney.

Reference: Morningstar.com (Dec. 9, 2020) “Providing for Disabled Beneficiaries After the SECURE Act”

Read more related articles at:

New Retirement Law Changes Special Needs Planning

Can a special needs trust avoid SECURE Act rules?

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

What is a Special Needs Trust?

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

Family Estate Planning

How Can Estate Planning Address the Troubled Child?

How Can Estate Planning Address the Troubled Child?

Every family has unique challenges when planning for the future, and every family needs to consider its individual beneficiaries in an honest light, even when the view isn’t pretty. Concerns may range from adults with substance abuse problems, an inability to make good decisions, or siblings with worrisome marriages. These situations can be addressed through estate planning documents, says the article “Estate Planning for ‘Black Sheep’ Beneficiaries” from Kiplinger.

How can you prepare your estate, when a problem child has grown into an adult with problems?

You have the option of not dividing your estate equally to beneficiaries.

Disinheriting a beneficiary occurs for a variety of reasons and is more common than you might think. If you have already given one child a down payment on a home, while another has gone through two divorces, you may want to make plans for one child to receive their share of the inheritance through a trust to protect them.

A family member who is disabled may benefit from a more generous inheritance than a successful sibling—although that inheritance must be structured properly, if the disabled person is to continue receiving support from government programs.

No matter the reason for unequal distributions, discuss the reasons for the difference in your estate plan with your family, or if your estate planning attorney advises it, include a discussion of your reasons in a document. This buttresses your plan against any claims against the estate and may prevent hard feelings between siblings.

You can change your mind about your estate plan if your ‘wild child’ gets his life together.

A regular evaluation of your estate plan—every three or four years, or whenever big life events occur—is always recommended. If your wayward child finds his footing and you want to change how he is treated in your estate plan, you can do that.

Your estate plan can include incentives, even after you are gone.

Specific provisions in a trust can be used to reward behavior. An incentive trust sets certain goals that must be met before funds are distributed, from completing college to maintaining employment or even to going through rehabilitation. Many estate plans stagger the distribution of funds, so heirs receive distributions over time, rather than all at once. An example: 1/3 at age 25, 1/2 at age 30 and the balance at age 40. This prevents the beneficiary from squandering all of his inheritance at once. Ideally, his financial skills grow, so he is better equipped to preserve a large sum at age 40.

Trusts are not that complicated, and their administration is not overly difficult.

People think trusts are for the wealthy only or are complicated and expensive. None of that is true. Trusts are excellent tools, considered the “Swiss Army Knife” of estate planning. Your estate planning attorney can craft trusts that will help you control how money flows to heirs, protect a special needs individual, minimize taxes and create a legacy. For families who have one or more “black sheep,” the trust is a perfect tool to protect your loved ones from themselves and their life choices.

Reference: Kiplinger (Dec. 8, 2020) “Estate Planning for ‘Black Sheep’ Beneficiaries”

Read more related articles at:

The Dilemma of Troubled Adult Child Beneficiaries

Estate planning for an Irresponsible Child & Why it is important?

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

5 Strategies to Keep Your Heirs From Blowing Their Inheritance

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

 

My Will

What Do I Need to Know about Creating a Will?

What Do I Need to Know about Creating a Will?

A simple or basic will allows you to specifically say the way in which you want your assets to be distributed among your beneficiaries after your death. This can be a good starting point for creating a comprehensive estate plan because you may need more than just a basic will.

KAKE’s recent article entitled “What Is a Simple Will and How Do You Make One?” explains that a last will and testament is a legal document that states what you want to happen to your property and “worldly goods” when you die. A simple will can be used to designate an executor for the will and a legal guardian for minor children and specify who (or which organizations) should inherit your assets when you die.

A will must be approved in the probate process when you pass away. After the probate court reviews the will to make sure it’s valid, your executor will take care of the collection and distribution of assets listed in the will. Your executor would also be responsible for paying any debts owed by your estate.

Whether you need a basic will or something more complex, usually depends on a few factors, including your age, the size of your estate and if you have children (and their ages).

Having a will in place can be a good starting point for estate planning. However, deciding if it should be simple or complex can depend on a number of factors, such as:

  • The size of your estate
  • The amount of estate tax you expect to owe
  • The type of assets and property you own
  • Whether you own a business
  • The number of beneficiaries you want to name
  • Whether the beneficiaries are individuals or organizations (like charities)
  • Any significant life changes you anticipate, like marriages, divorces, or having more children; and
  • Whether any of your children or beneficiaries have special needs.

With these situations, you may need a more detailed will to plan how you want your assets to be distributed. In any event, work with an experienced estate planning attorney. With life or financial changes, you may need to create a more complex will or consider a trust. It is smart to speak with an estate planning attorney, who can help you determine which components to include in your plan and help you keep it updated.

Reference: KAKE (Nov. 23, 2020) “What Is a Simple Will and How Do You Make One?”

Read more related articles here:

Here’s what you need to know about creating a will

All You Need To Know About Creating A Will

Also, read one of our previous Blog’s here:

Do You Have a Will?

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

bills as inheritance

Will I Get A Bill as My Inheritance?

Will I Get A Bill as My Inheritance?

Will I Get A Bill as My Inheritance? When someone dies and leaves debts, you may ask if you have any personal liability to pay them. The answer is typically no, even though those debts don’t automatically disappear. However, there are situations in which you may have to address issues with a loved one’s creditors after they are gone, says KAKE’s recent article entitled “Can I Inherit Debt?”

The responsibility for ensuring the estate’s debts are paid, is typically that of the executor. An executor performs several tasks to wrap up a person’s estate after death. They include:

  • Obtaining a copy of the deceased’s will, if they had one, and filing it with the probate court
  • Notifying creditors and other entities of the person’s death (like the Social Security Administration to stop benefits)
  • Creating an inventory of the deceased’s assets and their value
  • Liquidating assets to pay off any debts owed by the estate; and
  • Distributing the remaining property to the individuals or organizations named in the deceased’s will (if they had one) or according to inheritance laws, if they didn’t.

In terms of debt repayment, executors must notify creditors who may have a claim against the estate. Creditors are given a set period of time to make a financial claim against the estate’s assets for repayment of debts. It’s not that uncommon for a disreputable creditor to attempt to get paid by the deceased’s relatives.

Any assets in the estate that have a named beneficiary, such as a life insurance policy, a 401(k), individual retirement account, payable on death accounts or annuity, would be transferred to that beneficiary automatically and cannot be touched by creditors.

You typically don’t inherit debts of another like you might inherit property or other assets from them. Thus, if a debt collector tries get money from you, you’re under no legal obligation to pay.

However, if you cosigned a loan with the deceased or opened a joint credit card account or line of credit, those debts are legally yours, just as much as they are the person who died. If they pass away, you’d be solely responsible for repaying them.

You should also know that you may be liable for long-term care costs incurred by your parents, while they were alive. Many states require children to cover nursing home bills, although they aren’t always enforced.

As for spouses, the same rules of debt responsibility apply. However, for debts that are in one spouse’s name only, it’s important to understand how living in a community property state can impact your liability for marital debts. If you live in a community property state (Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington and Wisconsin), debts incurred after the marriage by one spouse can be treated as a shared financial obligation.

Reference: KAKE (December 2, 2020) “Can I Inherit Debt?”

Read more related articles at:

What if your inheritance turns out to be just a pile of bills?

Can you inherit your dead parent’s debts?

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

What Debts Must Be Paid after I Die?

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

Kenny Rogers

What’s Going on with the Estate of Kenny Rogers?

What’s Going on with the Estate of Kenny Rogers?

TMZ reported that the estate of the late Kenny Rogers alleged that Kelly Junkermann convinced the country and pop singer to allow him to film his last tour.

Kenny supposedly agreed but did so under the strict condition that the footage be only for personal use.

Rogers’ estate now says that Junkermann disregarded that agreement and attempted to commercially release a DVD called “Kenny Rogers — The Gambler’s Last Deal.”

Wealth Advisor’s recent article entitled “Kenny Rogers estates sues longtime friend over unauthorized tour DVD” reports that the lawsuit states that Junkermann consistently asked for approval to use the content he’d collected but was always denied.

Regardless of this rejection, he moved forward and inked a deal to distribute the footage.

The lawsuit states that the tour footage is filled with “priceless and irreplaceable audio, video, photographic and audiovisual content that were compiled over the course of Kenny Rogers’ decades-long career.”

One of the reasons the estate wants Junkermann’s DVD blocked, is that it has its own DVD of the final tour and doesn’t want fans to be confused. The estate also says that Junkermann’s DVD isn’t up to Kenny’s high standards.

TMZ reported that the estate blocked the release of Junkermann’s DVD earlier in 2020, but it cost nearly $300,000 in legal fees to be accomplished.

The Rogers estate is formally suing for damages and for an injunction blocking the DVD from Junkermann from ever coming out.

The country music icon, who passed away in March at age 81, announced his Gambler’s Last Deal Tour in 2015 and completed it two years later. Officially, the star’s last show was in October 2017 at a star-studded farewell concert in Nashville. However, he played a few shows after that, until he canceled all remaining performances after April 2018.

Junkermann’s DVD was actually set for presale in late 2019, but links to online vendors and video trailers are no longer working.

Junkermann also had a forward written for the package.

Reference: Wealth Advisor (Dec. 1, 2020) “Kenny Rogers estates sues longtime friend over unauthorized tour DVD”

Read more related articles at:

False claim: Kenny Rogers’ wife donated half his estate to Donald Trump’s re-election campaign

Kenny Rogers Net Worth

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

Which Stars Made the Biggest Estate Planning Blunders?

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.

COVID vaccine

The Most Common Myths about COVID Vaccine

The Most Common Myths about COVID Vaccine

The unprecedented speed of the development of the vaccine to fight COVID-19 has led to several misconceptions and rumors that have created some skepticism among some Americans. AARP’s recent article entitled “7 Myths About Coronavirus Vaccines” provides some of the most prevalent coronavirus vaccine myths and the truth about the medicines that will fight COVID-19:

Myth #1: If you’ve had COVID-19 already, you don’t need to get vaccinated. Unsure. It’s not certain how long you are protected from COVID-19 after a previous infection (natural immunity).

Myth #2: Once you receive the coronavirus vaccine, you’re immune for life. Perhaps. It’s not yet clear how long immunity from a coronavirus vaccine will last and if it’ll need to be administered more than once, or even on a regular basis, like the flu shot.

Myth #3: You can stop wearing your mask after you get vaccinated. Wrong. The vaccine is just one tool that can help slow the spread of the coronavirus. However, we still need to end the pandemic, which will require mask wearing, social distancing, frequent handwashing and testing. It will take months to get the majority of Americans who want a coronavirus vaccine vaccinated, and until a good percentage of the population develops resistance to COVID-19 and so-called herd immunity is reached, the virus will continue to spread and sicken people. Protection also isn’t immediate. We also don’t know if the vaccine will block virus transmission.

Myth #4: The vaccines use a live version of the coronavirus. No. None of the vaccines in late-stage development in the U.S. use the live virus that causes COVID-19, the CDC says. The vaccine may cause side effects, such as injection site pain, fatigue, headaches, chills and muscle aches.

Myth #5: mRNA vaccines can change your DNA. No. Two of the four vaccine candidates in late-stage U.S. trials (the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, which was authorized by the federal government on Dec. 11, and the Moderna/NIH vaccine) use a new type of technology called messenger RNA, or mRNA for short. It is like an instruction manual that tells your body to build an immune response to a specific infection.  There are now no licensed mRNA vaccines in the U.S., but a myth on social media claims that mRNA vaccines can alter human DNA. However, the CDC says this is not true.

Myth #6: You’re not required to get both doses of the two-dose vaccines. That’s incorrect. All but one of the vaccines require two doses that are administered a few weeks apart. Skipping the second shot isn’t wise. The CDC explains that the first shot starts building protection, then the second shot boosts that protection and “is needed to get the most protection the vaccine has to offer.”

Myth #7: If you got the flu shot recently, you don’t need a coronavirus vaccine. Not true! It is accurate that the flu and COVID-19 share a similar list of symptoms, but they’re two different illnesses, caused by two different viruses. You should get both types of vaccines.

Reference: AARP (Dec. 14, 2020) “7 Myths About Coronavirus Vaccines”

Read more related articles at:

COVID-19 vaccine myths debunked

The real facts about common COVID-19 vaccine myths

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

How Can Estate Planning Protect Me from COVID-19?

Click here to check out our On Demand Video about Estate Planning.