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Young Family

Estate Planning Is For Everyone

Estate planning is something anyone who is 18 years old or older needs to think about, advises the article “Estate planning for every stage of life from the Independent Record. It includes much more than a person’s last will and testament. It protects you from incapacity, provides the legal right to allow others to talk to your doctors if you can’t and takes care of your minor children, if an unexpected tragedy occurs. Let’s look at all the ages and stages where estate planning is needed.

Parents of young adults should discuss estate planning with their children. While parents devote decades to helping their children become independent adults, sometimes life doesn’t go the way you expect. A college freshman is more concerned with acing a class, joining a club and the most recent trend on social media. However, a parent needs to think about what happens when the child is over 18 and has a medical emergency. Parents have no legal rights to medical information, medical decision making or finances, once a child becomes a legal adult. Hospitals may not release private information and doctors can’t talk with parents, even in an extreme situation. Young adults need to have a HIPAA release, a durable power of medical attorney and a power of attorney for their finances created.

New parents also need estate planning. While it may be hard to consider while adjusting to having a new baby in the house, what would happen to that baby if something unexpected were to affect both parents? The estate planning attorney will create a last will and testament, which is used to name a guardian for any minor children, in case both parents pass. This also includes decisions that need to be made about the child’s education, medical treatment and even their social life. You’ll need to name someone to be the child’s guardian, and to be sure that they will raise your child the same way that you would.

An estate plan includes naming a conservator, who is a person with control over a minor child’s finances. You’ll want to name a responsible person who is trustworthy and good with handling money. It is possible to name the same person as guardian and conservator. However, it may be wise to separate the responsibilities.

An estate plan also ensures that your children receive their inheritance, when you think they will be responsible enough to handle it. If a minor child’s parents die and there is no  plan, the parent’s assets will be held by the court for the benefit of the child. Once the child turns 18, he or she will receive the entire amount in one lump sum. Few who are 18-years old are able to manage large sums of money. Estate planning helps you control how the money is distributed. This is also something to consider, when your children are the beneficiaries of any life insurance policies. An estate planning attorney can help you set up trusts, so the monies are distributed at the right time.

When people enter their ‘golden’ years—that is, they are almost retired—it is the time for estate plans to be reviewed. You may wish to name your children as power of attorney and medical power of attorney, rather than a sibling. It’s best to have people who will be younger than you for these roles as you age. This may also be the time to change how your wealth is distributed. Are your children old enough to be responsible with an inheritance? Do you want to create a legacy plan that includes charitable giving?

Lastly, update your estate plan any time there are changes in the family structure. Divorce, death, marriage or individuals with special needs all require a different approach to the basic estate plan. It’s a good idea to revisit an estate plan anytime there have been major changes in your relationships, to the law, or changes to your financial status.

Reference: Independent Record (March 1, 2020) “Estate planning for every stage of life

Read more relevant articles at:   ESTATE PLANNING IS FOR EVERYONE/globalwealthadvisors

You’re never too Young to Estate Plan

Also Read our previous gs at :  Creating an Estate Plan Should Be a New Year’s Resolution

                                                          Am I Too Young to Think About Estate Planning?

 

 

 

COVID 19 AND SMALL BUSINESSES

C19 UPDATE: Small Businesses Hurt by COVID-19 May Qualify for SBA Disaster Relief Loans

C19 UPDATE: Small Businesses Hurt by COVID-19 May Qualify for SBA Disaster Relief Loans.  It’s estimated that some 30 million US small businesses may fall victim to the coronavirus through closures, cancellations and other revenue losses. With no clear end in sight, the Small Business Administration (SBA) is offering eligible businesses low-interest disaster relief loans to cover operating expenses.

These loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that can’t be paid because of the disaster’s impact. The interest rate is 3.75% for small businesses. The interest rate for non-profits is 2.75%. In order to keep payments affordable, they are offering long-term repayments, up to a maximum of 30 years. Terms are determined on a case-by-case basis, based upon each borrower’s ability to repay.

The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering designated states and territories low-interest federal disaster loans for working capital to small businesses suffering substantial economic injury as a result of the Coronavirus (COVID-19). Upon a request received from a state’s or territory’s Governor, SBA will issue under its own authority, as provided by the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act that was recently signed by the President, an Economic Injury Disaster Loan declaration.

For more information on areas currently eligible for SBA disaster relief and to apply for a loan, visit the SBA website at https://www.sba.gov/disaster-assistance/coronavirus-covid-19 or call the SBA disaster assistance customer service center at 1-800-659-2955 (TTY: 1-800-877-8339) or e-mail  disastercustomerservice@sba.gov.

Resources: SBA Disaster Assistance in Response to the Coronavirus.

Read Related Articles at :

SBA to Provide Disaster Assistance Loans for Small Businesses Impacted by Coronavirus (COVID-19)

SBA Updates Criteria on States for Requesting Disaster Assistance Loans for Small Businesses Impacted by Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Also read one of our previous Blogs at:

C19 UPDATE: Paying for Covid-19 Testing and Treatment if You Have a High Deductible Insurance Plan

C19 UPDATE: Emergency Estate Planning Decisions to Make Right Now

Princes brother

How Does the Death of Prince’s Brother Impact the Late Rock Star’s Estate?

How Does the Death of Prince’s Brother Impact the Late Rock Star’s Estate?  Alfred Jackson was one of six of Prince’s siblings who were heirs to their brother’s fortune worth at least $100 million. But they sold 90% of his estate rights last year to Primary Wave, a well-funded and growing entertainment company that invests in music publishing and recording rights. Prince’s sister Tyka Nelson also struck a deal with Primary Wave, and was given cash up front as the estate proceedings drag on.

The StarTribune’s recent article entitled “Death of Prince heir complicates estate settlement even more” reports that because of these moves, about a third of Prince’s assets could wind up being controlled by parties who were not related to him—which adds to the tough job of settling the late rock star’s estate.

Just a few hours after signing with Primary Wave in August of 2019, the sixty-six-year-old Jackson succumbed to heart disease, while at his home in Kansas City. However, unlike Prince, he had signed a will. Jackson did not have a wife or children. However, in another twist, rather than leaving his estate to his siblings, he bequeathed all his assets to a friend, Raffles Van Exel, who claims to be an entertainment consultant. However, he’s best known for hanging out with Whitney Houston in her final days, as well as Michael Jackson’s family. Exel was also a creative force behind O.J. Simpson’s notorious “If I Did It” book project.

Primary Wave’s deal with Jackson is being reviewed by his own family, at least his siblings who aren’t related to Prince. They aim to contest his will.

Prince’s accidental death by fentanyl in 2016 created one of the largest and most complicated probate court proceedings in Minnesota history. That’s because the rock star failed to draft a will. The value of his estate is somewhere between $100 million to $300 million estate and is comprised of potential music royalties.

Prince’s heirs are unable to get their money from his estate until it is settled. Because the probate proceedings are dragging on, Primary Wave offered Prince’s heirs the chance to raise cash by selling their estate rights. These heirs are all approaching 60Jackson wanted to enjoy life now, rather than wait for the process to be finalized. The siblings, by that time, may be too old, sick or dead to enjoy their inheritance.

Primary Wave tried to get at least three of Prince’s siblings — Sharon, Norrine, and John Nelson, to sell their estate rights. However, the three refused and said in a recent court filing that they are concerned that Primary Wave will use its deep pockets to their detriment. The company’s involvement would only lead to more delays and tensions, the siblings said in a letter directly to the probate judge. With the case draining their “limited resources,” the three explained that they are unable to pay legal counsel in this case and are representing themselves.

The terms of Primary Wave’s deals with Tyka Nelson and Alfred Jackson are private. However, the company has been asserting its rights in Prince’s probate case. A 2019 court filing said that the company says it “stands in the shoes” of the two heirs. That is How  the Death of Prince’s Brother Impacts the Late Rock Star’s Estate.

Reference: StarTribune (February 22, 2020) “Death of Prince heir complicates estate settlement even more”

Read more related articles at: 

Death of Prince heir complicates estate settlement even more

Prince’s Posthumous Year In Business Was Full Of Weirdos And Chaos

Read about other Celebrity Estate stories on one of our previous Blogs at:

Luke Perry’s Estate Planning – How Well Did He Do?

Why is Angelina Jolie Leaving Her Total Estate to Just One of Her Kids?

 

Walt Disney and his Grandchild

What are Walt Disney’s Heirs Worth?

What are Walt Disney’s Heirs Worth?  It’s not known just how much the Disney family is worth. GOBankingRates estimated the company’s net worth to be roughly $130 billion. Roy O.’s grandson, Roy P., said at one point that the family owns less than 3% of the company. Even so, that would put their fortune around $3.9 billion (not counting any investments in addition to Disney holdings).

Wealth Advisor’s recent article entitled “Disney Family Feud As Heirs Battle For $400 Million Trust Fund” says that in 1925, Walt married Lillian Bounds, a studio inker. Eight years later, she gave birth to Diane, and the couple later adopted their daughter Sharon as a baby.

Walt Disney is said to have adored his 10 grandchildren. When he died in 1966 of lung cancer, he left numerous trusts and family foundations for his family and heirs.

Walt’s younger daughter, Sharon, adopted one child, Victoria, with her first husband, Robert Brown. She then had twins, Brad and Michelle, with her second husband, Bill Lund. She died from breast cancer in 1993 at age 56. Michelle has never had a job and owns three homes, spending a lot of time in Newport Beach, CA according to Gardner.

Victoria reportedly lived an extravagant lifestyle that included $5,000-a-night suites at the Royal Palms in Las Vegas. One report notes that she once went on a Disney cruise ship and destroyed her suite to such a degree that Michael Eisner, then-CEO of the company, had to ask the trustees to pay for the damages. Her share of the family fortune was added to Brad’s and Michelle’s after she died in 2002 from health complications. However, Sharon’s twins later became embattled in a years-long feud over their $400 million trust fund. That inheritance was supposed to be distributed in annual payments and lump sums at five-year intervals at ages 35, 40, and 45. However, the trustees dispersed the payments to Michelle and withheld Brad’s.

Michelle and the trustees argued that Brad wasn’t able to take care of his share because of a “chronic cognitive disability” and that Bill, their father, was taking advantage of this to gain money, according to NBC News.

Bill said that the trustees were manipulating his daughter Michelle. Bill was previously a trustee but resigned after an allegation that he used trust money to gain more than $3 million in kickbacks from a real-estate deal. He reportedly agreed to an annual settlement of $500,000.  So we truly do not know what the Walt Disney’s Heirs Worth.

Reference: Wealth Advisor (Feb. 11, 2020) “Disney Family Feud As Heirs Battle For $400 Million Trust Fund”

Read some related articles at:                  The Disney’s, not the happiest family on Earth. /nbcnews.com

Disney Family Networth: Meet the family behind the media empire/businessinsider.com

Also Read one of our previous Blogs:                Are You Considering the Impact of Your Estate Plan on your Heirs?

 

DIY Estate Planning

How Bad Can a Do-It-Yourself Estate Plan Be? Very!

How Bad Can a Do-It-Yourself Estate Plan Be? Very!  Here’s a real world example of why what seems like a good idea backfires, as reported in The National Law Review’s article “Unintended Consequences of a Do-It-Yourself Estate Plan.”

Mrs. Ann Aldrich wrote her own will, using a preprinted legal form. She listed her property, including account numbers for her financial accounts. She left each item of property to her sister, Mary Jane Eaton. If Mary Jane Eaton did not survive, then Mr. James Aldrich, Ann’s brother, was the designated beneficiary.

A few things that you don’t find on forms: wills and trusts need to contain a residuary, and other clauses so that assets are properly distributed. Ms. Aldrich, not being an experienced estate planning attorney, did not include such clauses. This one omission became a costly problem for her heir that led to litigation.

Mary Jane Eaton predeceased Ms. Aldrich. As Mary Jane Eaton had named Ms. Aldrich as her beneficiary, Ms. Aldrich then created a new account to receive her inheritance from Ms. Eaton. She also, as was appropriate, took title to Ms. Eaton’s real estate.

However, Ms. Aldrich never updated her will to include the new account and the new real estate property.

After Ms. Aldrich’s death, James Aldrich became enmeshed in litigation with two of Ms. Aldrich’s nieces over the assets that were not included in Ms. Aldrich’s will. The case went to court.

The Florida Supreme Court ruled that Ms. Aldrich’s will only addressed the property specifically listed to be distributed to Mr. James Aldrich. Those assets passed to Ms. Aldrich’s nieces.

Ms. Aldrich did not name those nieces anywhere in her will, and likely had no intention for them to receive any property. However, the intent could not be inferred by the court, which could only follow the will.

This is a real example of two basic problems that can result from do-it-yourself estate planning: unintended heirs and costly litigation.

More complex problems can arise when there are blended family or other family structure issues, incomplete tax planning or wills that are not prepared properly and that are deemed invalid by the court.

Even ‘simple’ estate plans that are not prepared by an estate planning lawyer can lead to unintended consequences. Not only was the cost of litigation far more than the cost of having an estate plan prepared, but the relationship between Ms. Aldrich’s brother and her nieces was likely damaged beyond repair.  that is how bad a Do-It-Yourself Estate Plan Be!

Reference: The National Law Review (Feb. 10, 2020) “Unintended Consequences of a Do-It-Yourself Estate Plan”

Read more about this at : Do it yourself Estate Planning by the American Bar Association

Is Do-it- yourself Estate Planning a Valid option? from Forbes

You can also read one of our previous Blogs at:  Do it yourself Wills go wrong- Fast

 

 

Kirk Douglas

The Latest on Kirk Douglas’ Estate

What is The Latest on Kirk Douglas’ Estate? Wealth Advisor’s recent article entitled “Kirk Douglas Lived Well, Died Rich And May Trigger $200M Los Angeles Range War” explains that Douglas worked steadily in a four-decade period but slowed down after the early 1980s. Since that’s almost 40 years ago, one might think that what would be considered a modest legacy by modern standards would be whittled down considerably. However, Kirk Douglas died extremely rich, despite a long life and decades of semi-retirement.

Douglas was one of the first to ask to participate in the profit of his movies and was one of the first stars to form his own production company. For example, Spartacus was big enough to gross $30 million on its $12 million budget. When he started his company, he refused to pay himself for that film. Instead he took 60% of the profit and wound up about $3 million ahead. His company owned the films and sold off distribution rights.

His widow Anne is now the only shareholder of record. She’s rolled the money into a family trust that over the decades created numerous tiers of holding companies and joint ventures. One of those joint ventures ended up owning half the land under Marina Del Rey’s high-rise Shores apartment complex, a property that cost a reported $165 million to build. The land is nearly priceless.

Now that it’s only Anne, the successor trustees will one day need to decide what to do with the land. She called the shots on the accounting side. Kirk remarked that he didn’t even know where the money was. However, when he found out, he got eager to give it all away. Tens of millions have already been committed to hospitals, schools and theaters.

Estate tax won’t be an issue because Kirk and Anne conducted thorough estate planning so that any wealth that goes to the family will transfer via a trust. That way, they’ll get a portion of the income without triggering estate tax concerns.

Thanks to all of Kirk’s films—many of which he owned like Spartacus—he compiled tens of millions of dollars in cash and stock during his lifetime. In almost 70 years of marital bliss, his planning added up to a lot of marital property. It was good life with good things yet to come.

It’s a testament to the power of long-term thinking. Kirk Douglas’ fortune has remained intact for generations and will undoubtedly keep helping the world for many years to come.

So that is the Latest on Kirk Douglas’ Estate.

Reference:  Wealth Advisor (Feb. 4, 2020) “Kirk Douglas Lived Well, Died Rich And May Trigger $200M Los Angeles Range War”

Read these articles for more information:    Kirk Douglas gives most of $61M fortune to charity, leaving nothing for son Michael

                                                                                             Kirk Douglas leaves most of his $80 million fortune to charity

Also read one of our previous Blogs about other celebrities who left their Estate’s to charity:

George Michael’s Charity Continues

If you are interested in leaving part of your Estate to charity, we also have experience in this area. Visit our Website at:

Charitable Planning In Northeast Florida

 

IRA COUPLE

Am I Better Off Investing Earlier in My IRA?

Am I Better Off Investing Earlier in My IRA? Remember that you’re able to make an IRA contribution for a given year anytime between January 1 and the tax-filing deadline of the following year (usually April 15). That means that you can make a 2020 IRA contribution between Jan’ 1, 2020, and April 15, 2021. However, don’t wait. Why not?

Vanguard’s recent article entitled “IRA contributions: The earlier, the better” notes that you invest to earn money, and the amount of money you earn depends primarily on three factors—two you can control.

  1. Investment performance. There’s no way to control investment performance and all investing involves risk. The main cause of risk is market movement, which impacts your investment earnings.
  2. The amount you invest. You earn your money with compounding, when your investment earnings make their own earnings. If you contribute more, you have more money to generate earnings. That means you have more earnings to generate additional earnings. You can control the amount you invest, provided you keep within the annual IRA contribution limit.
  3. Your investment timing. If you wait until April to make an IRA contribution, you’ve missed 15 months of compounding, so if you have the financial flexibility to decide when you contribute to your IRA, do it ASAP.

As an illustration, let’s imagine that you invest $5,500 in your IRA each year for 30 years, and your average annual return is 4%. In Situation A, you make a lump-sum investment every January, and your end balance is $323,967. That includes $158,967 in earnings. In Situation B, you make a lump-sum investment every April and your end balance is $308,467. That includes $143,467 in earnings, which is $15,500 less than you’d earn in the first scenario. In each situation, you’re contributing a total of $165,000 to your IRA over the span of 30 years.

This illustration shows some what-if scenarios that aren’t always possible to do in real life. For instance, you may not be able to invest the same amount each year or have to skip a few years. However, you should make small steps toward saving 12%–15% of your gross income (including employer contributions) every year. If you don’t have the financial flexibility to make a lump-sum investment in your IRA—in January or April (or in any other month as a matter of fact), try to set up recurring automatic bank transfers. If you make bi-weekly contributions over the course of 30 years (for a total contribution of $165,000) and earn a 4% average annual return, the end balance is smaller than Situation A but larger than Situation B.

However, remember that you can’t contribute more than you’ve earned for the year.

Reference: Vanguard (Jan. 21, 2020) “IRA contributions: The earlier, the better”

Read more about this at: When is the Best Time to put money in your IRA-Forbes

   The Best Age to Open an IRA and start investing

Also read our previous blog at:    Can I Place My IRA in a Trust?

 

Medicare Mistakes

The High Cost of Medicare Mistakes

The High Cost of Medicare Mistakes can be daunting. A 68-year-old woman knew that she had to sign up at age 65 for Medicare Part A for hospital care and Part B for outpatient care, since she did not have employer provided health insurance from an employer with 20 or more employees. She knew also that if she did not have health insurance from an employer and didn’t sign up immediately, she’d face a penalty with higher Part B and Part D premiums for the rest of her life when eventually she did sign up, reports Forbes in the article “Beware Medicare’s Part B Premium Penalty And Surcharge Traps.”

Here’s where it got sticky: she thought that Medicare provided an eight-month special enrollment period after one job ended to apply penalty free. She is employed on a sporadic basis, so she thought she had a window of time. Between the ages of 65 and 68, she had several jobs with large employers, and was never out of work for more than eight months.

She was out of work for 25 months total between ages 65 and 68, when she was not enrolled in Medicare. She thought that since she was never out of work for more than eight months, she didn’t have to sign up until she officially stopped working and would then enroll penalty free in traditional Medicare Parts A, B, and D.

She had read information on the Medicare website and her interpretation of the information was wrong. It was a costly mistake.

In determining whether you need to permanently pay a Medicare Part B penalty, Medicare counts up all the months between age 65 and the month you first enroll in Part B, even if you have a job with a large employer with no gaps in employment for more than eight months.

She got hit with a 20% lifetime Medicare Part B premium penalty. For every 12 months that you’re not covered by Medicare B after reaching 65 and before you enroll, the penalty is an additional 10%. And making things worse, she was hit with a Medicare Part B penalty based on the cumulative (not consecutive, which is an important difference) 25 months that she went without credible prescription drug coverage.

This is the sort of problem that does not self-resolve or get better over time. In this case, another mistake in timing is going to hurt her. She sold some assets and realized a capital gain in 2018, which increased her Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI). In 2020, she’s going to have to pay the Income Related Monthly Adjustment Amount (IRMAA). If your MAGI, two years before the current year, is less than $87,000, you are exempt from IRMAA in the current year. Her cost: $1,735.20 more this year. Had she instead realized those capital gains over the course of several years, her 2018 MAGI might not have crossed the $87,000 threshold. Most people are not aware of the IRMAA and take capital gains in larger amounts than they need.

This is a harsh lesson to learn, at a time in life when there’s not a lot of flexibility or time to catch up. Talking with an estate planning lawyer about Medicare and about tax planning, as well as having an estate plan created, would have spared this woman, and countless others, from the harsh consequences of her mistakes.

Reference: Forbes (Jan. 29, 2020) “Beware Medicare’s Part B Premium Penalty And Surcharge Traps”

Read More about this from CNBC at: Don’t make these common, costly Medicare mistakes

And from AARP:  How to Avoid Mistakes When enrolling in Medicare

Also check out our previous Blog:  New Medicare Rule Makes it Harder to Receive Home Care

Business Owners Should Start End-Game Planning Now

Most parents understand that the ultimate goal of child-rearing is to help a child become an independent adult. For the business owner, this means building a business that would continue after they have retired or passed away. However, when it comes to estate planning, says the article “Why Business Owners Should Think About Estate Planning Sooner Than Later,” from Forbes, many business owners think only about their personal assets and their children. Business Owners Should Start End-Game Planning Now!

For a successful business owner who wants to see their business continue long after they have moved on to the next chapter in their lives, the best time to start succession planning is now.

Succession and estate planning should not be something you wait to do until the end of your life. Most people make this mistake. They don’t want to think about their own mortality or what will happen after they’ve died. Very rarely do people realize the value of estate planning and succession planning when they are engaged in a start-up or when their companies are just getting solid footing. They are too busy with the day-to-day concerns of running a business than they are with developing a succession plan.

However, any estate planning attorney who has been practicing for more than a few years knows that this is a big mistake. Securing assets and business planning sooner, not later, is a far better way to go.

Business continuity is the first concern for entrepreneurs. It’s not an easy topic. It’s far better to have this addressed when the owner is well and the business is flourishing. Therefore, the business owner is making decisions and not others, who may be emotionally invested but not knowledgeable about the business.

A living trust and will can put in place certain parameters that a trustee can carry out. This should include naming the individuals who are trusted to make decisions. Having those names and decisions made will minimize the amount of arguing between recipients of assets. Let them be mad at you for your choices, rather than squabbling between each other.

Create a business succession plan that designates successor trustees who will be in charge of managing the business, in the event of the owner’s incapacity or death. A power of attorney document is used to nominate a fiduciary agent to act on your behalf if you should become incapacitated, but a trust should be considered to provide for a smoother transition of the business to successor trustees.

By transferring a business to a trust, the inconvenience and costs of probate may be avoided and assets will be passed along to chosen beneficiaries. Timely planning also preserves business assets, since they can take advantage of advanced tax planning strategies.

Estate and succession planning is usually not top-of-mind for young business owners, but it is essential planning. Talk with an experienced estate planning attorney to get yourself and your business ahead of the game.

Reference: Forbes

Also read these related articles:

Managing the Trickiest Parts of a Family Business

Estate planning for business owners: What happens to your business when you leave?

And check out our Previous Blog:   Why Should I Pair my Business Succession and Estate Planning?

Estate and Business Succession Planning is Critical

Small Business Owners Need Business Succession and Estate Planning

For the entrepreneurial-minded person, nothing beats the excitement of having a vision for a business, and then making that dream come true. However, have you ever wondered what will happen to that business after you are gone? Business succession planning and personal estate planning are critical.

A comprehensive estate plan, says Bakersfield.com, in the recent article “Estate planning tips for small business owners,” provides a plan that can protect your life’s work.

It makes sense. You’ve likely spent decades building your business throughout your working life. You’re proud of what you have accomplished, and you should be. You should then protect it with a well-thought-out plan. Your estate planning attorney will be able to help you design a two-pronged plan for your business and your personal life. For business owners, these two are intertwined.

Can you avoid taxes? Reviewing your personal and business assets, as part of an estate plan, is the best way to minimize the tax exposure of your estate and facilitate an organized sale or succession plan for your business. You can’t completely avoid taxes, but good planning will help them from being excessive.

There are a number of IRS sections that can help, and your estate planning attorney will know them. For example, Section 6166 gives your loved ones more time to pay the tax, by paying in ten annual installments. Another Section, 303, lets your family redeem stock with few tax penalties. Talk with your attorney and CPA to find out if your business is eligible for either of these strategies. Create a plan and talk about it in detail with survivors to help them navigate the transition.

Do you have a buy-sell agreement in place? This is critical, if more than one person owns the business. The buy-sell agreement dictates how the partnership or LLC is distributed upon the death or incapacity of one of the owners. Without one, family members may be stuck owning a company they don’t want or don’t know anything about. Alternatively, your former partners may find themselves partnered with people with whom they never intended to go into business.

The buy-sell agreement creates a plan so, when an owner passes, the shares of the company must be bought out by the other owners at a fair market price. The agreement can even establish a sale price, so family members will know exactly what they can expect to receive from the sale. In addition, a buy-sell agreement can be used to block certain individuals from taking a role in the business. For many family businesses, that’s enough of a reason to make sure to have a buy-sell agreement.

How are life insurance policies used by small business owners? Maybe you want the business to die with you. Some small businesses provide a stable income for the owner, but there’s no plan for the business to be passed to another family member or to survive the passing of the owner. If that is your situation, and you want your family to have income, you’ll need a life insurance policy.

A life insurance policy can also be used to help partners with the capital they’ll need to purchase your shares, if that is how your buy-sell agreement has been set up.

As a small business owner and a family breadwinner, you want to be sure your family and your business are prepared for your passing. Talk with your estate planning attorney to make sure both are protected, in the event of your passing.

Learn what might happen to your business if you do not undertake business succession and estate planning.

Reference: Bakersfield.com (July 15, 2019) “Estate planning tips for small business owners”

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