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Robert Redford

Did Robert Redford Have a Business Exit Plan?

Did Robert Redford Have a Business Exit Plan?

Motley Fool’s recent article titled “What Robert Redford’s Sale of Sundance Can Teach Investors About Exit Planning” says that, in announcing the sale, Redford told the Salt Lake Tribune that he’s been thinking of selling for several years. However, he wanted to find the right partners. Broadreach and Cedar plan to upgrade the resort, add hotel rooms and build a new inn. The companies have also said that they will keep the resort sustainable and practicing measured growth, as well as also continuing to host the Sundance Film Festival.

The 2,600-acre resort has 1,845 acres of land saved from future development through a conservation easement and protective covenants. The 84-year-old actor has had a lifelong interest in the environment and in land stewardship. Redford and his family have also arranged with Utah Open Lands to create the Redford Family Elk Meadows Preserve at the base of Mt. Timpanogos. The gift will reduce Redford’s tax liability on his estate.

Both Broadreach and Cedar have extensive hospitality experience, but neither looks to have much ski resort experience. However, they’re working with Bill Jensen, an industry legend, who recently left his role as CEO of Telluride Ski and Golf Resort in Colorado.

Business exit and succession planning can be difficult—in part, because people don’t like to address such unwelcome topics. Most investors don’t have the luxury of waiting years to find the right buyer, but the Redford deal does show that planning ahead may be critical to creating a mechanism that supports the vision for the property.

When selling a large investment property, you must first understand why you’re selling, and your desired end result. Of course, a return on investment is nice, but there may be other considerations, like in Redford’s case. Another key is ascertaining the updated worth of what you’re selling. Get a valuation, especially with an irreplaceable asset.

The structure of the sale is important. You will likely be liable for tax on your capital gains, so ask an attorney. If you’re also structuring your estate plans at the same time, you’ll need to know what amount you can give and what your heirs may have to pay. Talk to an experienced estate planning attorney to be certain that you’re covering all the bases.

Reference: Motley Fool (Dec. 12, 2020) “What Robert Redford’s Sale of Sundance Can Teach Investors About Exit Planning”

Read more related articles at:

Estate Planning Terms

What Key Estate Planning Terms Should I Know?

What Key Estate Planning Terms Should I Know?

Estate planning can help you accomplish several objectives, including naming guardians for minor children, choosing healthcare agents to make decisions for you should you become ill, minimizing taxes so you can give more wealth to your heirs and saying how and to whom you would like to pass your estate at death.

Emmett Messenger Index’s recent article entitled “13 Estate Planning Terms You Need to Know” provides some important terms to understand as you consider your own estate plan.

Assets: This is anything a person owns. It can include a home and other real estate, bank accounts, life insurance, investments, furniture, jewelry, collectibles, art, and clothing.

Beneficiary: This is an individual or entity (like a charity) that gets a beneficial interest in an asset, such as an estate, trust, account, or insurance policy.

Distribution: A payment in cash or asset(s) to the beneficiary who’s designated to receive it.

Estate: All of the assets and debts left by a person at death.

Fiduciary: An individual with a legal obligation or duty to act primarily for another person’s benefit, such as a trustee or agent under a power of attorney.

Funding: The process of transferring or retitling assets to a trust. Note that a living trust will only avoid probate at the trustmaker’s death if it’s fully funded. A trustmaker also may be known as a grantor, settlor, or trustor.

Incapacitated or Incompetent: The situation when a person is unable to manage her own affairs, either temporarily or permanently, and often involves a lack of mental capacity.

Inheritance: These are assets received from someone who has died.

Probate: This is the orderly court-supervised process of distributing the assets of a person who has died.

Trust: This is a fiduciary relationship where a trustmaker gives a trustee the right to hold property or assets for the benefit of another party, known as the beneficiary. The trust is a written trust agreement that directs how the trust assets will be distributed to the beneficiary.

Will: A written document with directions for disposing of a person’s assets after their death. A will is enforced by a probate court. A will can provide for the nomination of a guardian for minor children.

Reference: Emmett Messenger Index (Oct. 28, 2020) “13 Estate Planning Terms You Need to Know”

Read more related articles at:

Estate Planning Glossary

Glossary of Estate Planning Terms ABA

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

Estate Planning Is a Gift and a Legacy for Loved Ones

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Retirement Planning

Why Planning Tasks Don’t Stop Because You’ve Retired

Why Planning Tasks Don’t Stop Because You’ve Retired

How you handle money and legal matters during retirement is more important than during your working years. It’s harder to bounce back from financial setbacks when you aren’t getting a regular paycheck. Managing finances and legal affairs to keep your savings intact and your estate plan current is part of your new responsibility as a retiree, says a recent article “7 Money Moves You Should Make After Retiring” from MoneyTalksNews.

  1. Review estate planning documents. One of the most important documents is your will, but you also need to review any power of attorney and trust documents. A will is used to specify what you want done with your property after you die. What happens if you die without a will? The state will step in and make those decisions for you.

If you marry, divorce, inherit or buy property, you should update your will to reflect your changed circumstances. The arrival of a new grandchild may make you want to change your beneficiaries.

Reviewing your will after retirement and then periodically afterwards can put your mind at ease. If you don’t have a will, now is the time to have one created with an experienced estate planning attorney. You may also need a living will, power of attorney and letter of intent.

  1. Review named beneficiaries. Beneficiary designations require updating anytime there is a change in your life. When you purchase life insurance, enroll in a pension plan or open an individual retirement account, you are often asked to name a beneficiary–the person who will inherit the proceeds when you die. These instructions take precedence over instructions in a will.
  2. Prepare for your funeral. No one wants to consider their own mortality, but helping your loved ones be financially prepared for your funeral is a gift. By planning your own funeral, including making arrangements for funds to be available to pay for it, you save your family of the burden of having to plan and pay for a funeral while they are grieving your loss. Planning in advance also gives you an opportunity to decide what type of funeral you want.
  3. Consider trimming transportation costs. If your household has two cars, but you could manage with one, consider paring down this expense. Seniors tend to pay higher rates than young people, so this is one way to trim your monthly expenses.
  4. Review emergency fund status. Having money set aside for unexpected expenses is more important now than when you were working. An emergency fund can help you avoid taking money out of retirement accounts, which costs you not only the funds themselves, but the potential growth of the funds and any taxes that might be due on withdrawals.
  5. Plan for Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) and taxes. Once you celebrate your 72nd birthday, you’ll need to start taking RMDs from tax-deferred retirement accounts. If you miss an RMD deadline or don’t take out enough, you may have to pay a 50% tax penalty on the amount of money you did not withdraw. RMDs are treated as taxable income, so they may impact your federal income tax rate, as well as the “combined income” formula used to determine the extent to which your Social Security benefits are taxable.
  6. Do you still need life insurance? If your family is not dependent upon your income, now might be the time to drop life insurance policies. The main purpose of life insurance is to provide an income stream for loved ones, if you should die unexpectedly when you are working and raising a family. However, if you are retired, your children are grown and your spouse is not relying on your income, it may be time to let the policies lapse. On the other hand, if you can afford the premiums and wish to leave the proceeds to a spouse or your children, by all means keep the policy. However, check the beneficiary designation.

Reference: MoneyTalksNews (Oct. 9, 2020) “7 Money Moves You Should Make After Retiring”

Read more related articles at:

Retirement Planning Doesn’t Stop When You Retire-Investopedia

Retirement Planning Doesn’t Stop When You Retire-Forbes

16 Retirement Mistakes You Will Regret Forever-Kiplinger

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

How Do I Include Retirement Accounts in Estate Planning?

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financial advisors

Why you should have a Financial Advisor help with your Estate Plan.

Why you should have a Financial Advisor help with your Estate Plan.

Why should you have a Financial Advisor help with your Estate Plan? Believe it or not, you have an estate. In fact, nearly everyone does. Your estate is comprised of everything you own— your car, home, other real estate, checking and savings accounts, investments, life insurance, furniture, personal possessions. No matter how large or how modest, everyone has an estate and something in common—you can’t take it with you when you die.

When that happens—and it is a “when” and not an “if”—you probably want to control how those things are given to the people or organizations you care most about. To ensure your wishes are carried out, you need to provide instructions stating whom you want to receive something of yours, what you want them to receive, and when they are to receive it. You will, of course, want this to happen with the least amount paid in taxes, legal fees, and court costs. Ref: What is Estate Planning?

So, why should you have a Financial Advisor help with your Estate Plan? Estate planning can be complex, especially during your first consultation. Clients sometimes “blank” on questions because there is a lot of new information that they haven’t thought of until the time comes to plan for their future. Estate Plans are unique and tailored to each individual situation. Your financial advisor is an expert on your finances. It is your advisor’s job to know your financial goals and understand how your assets are titled. A good financial advisor knows how important it is to have a good estate plan to meet your long term financial goals.

What Is a Financial Advisor, and What Do They Do? Financial Advisors manage your money. They help you create a plan for meeting your financial goals, and they guide your progress along the way. They can help you save more, invest wisely, or reduce debt. A financial advisor offers assistance with, or, in some cases, conducts the complete management of your finances. The term “financial advisor” is used to describe a wide variety of people and services, including investment managers, financial consultants, and financial planners. The services provided by financial advisors will vary based on the type of advisor, but generally speaking, a financial advisor will assess your current financial situation including your assets, debts, and expenses, and identify areas for improvement. A good financial advisor will ask you about your goals and create a plan to help you reach them. That may mean calculating how much you should save for retirement, making sure you have an adequate emergency fund, offering tax-planning suggestions or helping you refinance or pay off debt.

Financial advisors also help invest your money, either by recommending specific investments or providing complete investment management. In some cases, you can choose which services you want or need based on the type of advisor you select. For example, a traditional in-person advisor will likely offer personalized, hands-on guidance for an ongoing fee.

Your Financial Advisor has your entire financial Blueprint, often at his or her fingertips. Estate Planning is often a much-advised step for your continued financial success. Estate Planning protects the hard work your Financial Planner has put into investing your finances and making the proper recommendations so that you can leave behind a financial Legacy to your loved ones. While Financial Advisors help you invest and grow your financial Nest Egg, Estate Planning Attorneys create plans that help you protect that Nest Egg throughout and beyond your lifetime. They provide peace of mind that all the hard work you’ve done amassing your personal wealth, and the care you’ve taken to save and invest, will be distributed exactly how you wish and will avoid as much taxation as possible. Estate Planning attorney’s can help you avoid Probate and future headaches for your loved ones at an already difficult time. Financial Advisors and Estate Planning Attorney’s work hand in hand to help you create and protect your Legacy.

Read more related articles here:

Here’s Why Financial Advisors are Important to an Estate Plan

Estate Planning Strategies: How Your Financial Advisor Can Help

Also, visit our website at:

For Professional Advisors

Also, read one of our previous blogs at;

Consider Funding a Trust with Life Insurance

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Pre Election

Pre-Election Estate Planning Includes a Vast Variety of Trusts

You might remember a flurry of activity in advance of the 2016 presidential election, when concerns about changes to the estate tax propelled many people to review their estate plans. In 2020, COVID-19 concerns have added to pre-presidential election worries. A recent article from Kiplinger, “Pre-Election Estate Planning Moves for High Net-Worth Families,” describes an extensive selection of trusts that can are used to protect wealth, and despite the title, not all of these trusts are just for the wealthy.

The time to make these changes is now, since there have been many instances where tax changes are made retroactively—something to keep in mind. The biggest opportunity is the ability to gift up to $11.58 million to another person free of transfer tax. However, there are many more.

Spousal Lifetime Access Trust (SLAT) The SLAT is an irrevocable trust created to benefit a spouse funded by a gift of assets, while the grantor-spouse is still living. The goal is to move assets out of the grantor spouse’s name into a trust to provide financial assistance to the spouse, while sheltering property from the spouse’s future creditors and taxable estate.

Beneficiary Defective Inheritor’s Trust (BDIT) The BDIT is an irrevocable trust structured so the beneficiary can manage and use assets but the assets are not included in their taxable estate.

Grantor Retained Annuity Trust (GRAT) The GRAT is also an irrevocable trust. The GRAT lets the grantor freeze the value of appreciating assets and transfer the growth at a discount for federal gift tax purposes. The grantor contributes assets in the trust and retains the right to receive an annuity from the trust, while earning a rate of return as specified by the IRS. GRATs are best in a low interest-rate environment because the appreciation of assets over the rate goes to the beneficiaries and at the end of the term of the trust, any leftover assets pass to the designated beneficiaries with little or no tax impact.

Gift or Sale of Interest in Family Partnerships. Family Limited Partnerships are used to transfer assets through partnership interests from one generation to the next. Retaining control of the property is part of the appeal. The partnerships may also be transferred at a discount to net asset value, which can reduce gift and estate tax liability.

Charitable Lead Trust (CLT). The CLT lets a grantor make a gift to a charitable organization while they are alive, while creating tax benefits for the grantor or their heirs. An annuity is paid to a charity for a set term, and when the term expires, the balance of the trust is available for the trust beneficiary.

Charitable Remainder Trust (CRT) The CRT is kind of like a reverse CLT. In a CRT, the grantor receives an income stream from the trust for a certain number of years. At the end of the trust term, the charitable organization receives the remaining assets. The grantor gets an immediate income tax charitable deduction when the CRT is funded, based on the present value of the estimated assets remaining after the end of the term.

These are a sampling of the types of trusts used to protect family’s assets. Your estate planning attorney will be able to determine if a trust is right for you and your family, and which one will be most advantageous for your situation.

Reference: Kiplinger (Aug. 16, 2020) “Pre-Election Estate Planning Moves for High Net-Worth Families”

Read more related articles at:

Pre-Election Estate Planning Moves for High-Net-Worth Families

Estate Planning in the 2020 Election Year

Also, read one of our previous blogs at:

Different Trusts for Different Estate Planning Purposes

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Distributions of Estate Planning

Estate Planning for Asset Distribution

Estate Planning for Asset Distribution

Without proper planning, your will determines who inherits your property—everything from your home, car, bank accounts and personal possessions. Your spouse may not necessarily be your heir—and that’s just one of many reasons to have an estate plan.

An estate plan avoids a “default” distribution of your possessions, says the recent article “Asset distribution when we die” from LimaOhio.com.

Let’s say someone names a nephew as the beneficiary of his life insurance policy. The life insurance company has a contractual legal responsibility to pay the nephew, when the policy owner dies. In turn, the nephew will be required to provide a death certificate and prove that he is indeed the nephew. This is an example of an asset governed by a contract, also described as a named beneficiary.

Assets that are not governed by a contract are distributed to whoever a person directs to get the asset in their will, aka their last will and testament. If there is no will, the state law will determine who should get the assets in a process known as “intestate probate.”

In this process, when there is a last will, the executor is in charge of the assets. The executor is overseen by the probate court judge, who reviews the will and must give approval before assets can be distributed. However, the probate court’s involvement comes with a price, and it is not always a fast process. It is always faster and less costly to have an asset be distributed through a contract, like a trust or by having a beneficiary named to the asset.

If a will only provides limited instructions, the state’s law will fill in the gaps. Therefore, any assets that pass-through contracts will be distributed directly, assets noted in the will go through probate and anything else will go usually to the next of kin.

A better course of action is to have an estate attorney review all of your assets, determine who you want to receive your property and make up a plan to make this happen in a smooth, tax-efficient manner.

Reference: LimaOhio.com (Aug. 22, 2020) “Asset distribution when we die”

Read more related articles at:

Estate Planning Strategies by Asset

Managing estate planning

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

Be Even and Fair in Estate Distribution

Click here to check out our Master Class!

Funding a Living Trust

What Happens If I Don’t Fund My Trust?

What Happens If I Don’t Fund My Trust?

Trust funding is a crucial step in estate planning that many people forget to do.

However, if it’s done properly, funding will avoid probate, provide for you in the event of your incapacity and save on estate taxes.

Forbes’s recent article entitled “Don’t Overlook Your Trust Funding” looks at some of the benefits of trusts.

Avoiding probate and problems with your estate. If you’ve created a revocable trust, you have control over the trust and can modify it during your lifetime. You are also able to fund it, while you are alive. You can fund the trust now or on your death. If you don’t transfer assets to the trust during your lifetime, then your last will must be probated, and an executor of your estate should be appointed. The executor will then have the authority to transfer the assets to your trust. This may take time and will involve court. You can avoid this by transferring assets to your trust now, saving your family time and aggravation after your death.

Protecting you and your family in the event that you become incapacitated. Funding the trust now will let the successor trustee manage the assets for you and your family, if your become incapacitated. If a successor trustee doesn’t have access to the assets to manage on your behalf, a conservator may need to be appointed by the court to oversee your assets, which can be expensive and time consuming.

Taking advantage of estate tax savings. If you’re married, you may have created a trust that contains terms for estate tax savings. This will often delay estate taxes until the death of the second spouse, by providing income to the surviving spouse and access to principal during his or her lifetime while the ultimate beneficiaries are your children. Depending where you live, the trust can also reduce state estate taxes. You must fund your trust to make certain that these estate tax provisions work properly.

Remember that any asset transfer will need to be consistent with your estate plan. Your beneficiary designations on life insurance policies should be examined to determine if the beneficiary can be updated to the trust.

You may also want to move tangible items to the trust, as well as any closely held business interests, such as stock in a family business or an interest in a limited liability company (LLC). Ask an experienced estate planning attorney about the assets to transfer to your trust.

Fund your trust now to maximize your updated estate planning documents.

Reference: Forbes (July 13, 2020) “Don’t Overlook Your Trust Funding”

Read more related articles at:

What Happens to Assets Left Out of Your Trust?

Do All Accounts Need to be Included in a Revocable Trust?

ESTATE PLANNING: Mom didn’t fund the trust

Also, read one of our previous Blogs at:

Why Is Trust Funding Important in Estate Planning?

Click here to check out our Master Class!

Celebrity Estate Planning Mistakes

Which Stars Made the Biggest Estate Planning Blunders?

Which Stars Made the Biggest Estate Planning Blunders?

Mistakes in the estate planning of high-profile celebrities are one very good way to learn the lessons of what not to do.

Forbes’ recent article entitled “Eight Lessons From Celebrity Estates” discussed some late celebrities who made some serious experienced estate planning blunders. Hopefully, we can learn from their errors.

James Gandolfini. The “Sopranos” actor left just 20% of his estate to his wife. If he’d left more of his estate to her, the estate tax on that gift would have been avoided in his estate. But the result of not maximizing the tax savings in his estate was that 55% of his total estate went to pay estate taxes.

James Brown. One of the hardest working men in show business left the copyrights to his music to an educational foundation, his tangible assets to his children and $2 million to educate his grandchildren. Because of ambiguous language in his estate planning documents, his girlfriend and her children sued and, years later and after the payment of millions in estate taxes, his estate was finally settled.

Michael Jackson.  Jackson created a trust but never funded the trust during his lifetime. This has led to a long and costly battle in the California Probate Court over control of his estate.

Howard Hughes. Although he wanted to give his $2.5 billion fortune to medical research, there was no valid written will found at his death. His fortune was instead divided among 22 cousins. The Hughes Aircraft Co. was bequeathed to the Hughes Medical Institute before his death and wasn’t included in his estate.

Michael Crichton. The author was survived by his pregnant second wife, so his son was born after his death. However, because his will and trust didn’t address a child being born after his death, his daughter from a previous marriage tried to cut out the baby boy from his estate.

Doris Duke. The heir to a tobacco fortune left her $1.2 billion fortune to her foundation at her death. Her butler was designated as the one in charge of the foundation. This led to a number of lawsuits claiming mismanagement over the next four years, and millions in legal fees.

Casey Kasem. The famous DJ’s wife and the children of his prior marriage fought over his end-of-life care and even the disposition of his body. It was an embarrassing scene that included the kidnapping and theft of his corpse.

Prince and Aretha Franklin. Both music legends died without a will or intestate. This has led to a very public, and in the case of Prince, a very contentious and protracted settlement of their estates.

So, what did we learn? Even the most famous (and the richest) people fail to carefully plan and draft a complete estate plan. They make mistakes with tax savings (Gandolfini), charities (Brown and Hughes), providing for family (Crichton), whom to name as the manager of the estate (Duke) and failing to prevent family disputes, especially in mixed marriages (Kasem).

If you have an estate plan, be sure to review your existing documents to make certain that they still accomplish your wishes. Get the help of an experienced estate planning attorney.

Reference: Forbes (July 16, 2020) “Eight Lessons From Celebrity Estates”

Read more related articles at:

The Biggest Estate Planning Blunders of All Time

6 Estate-Planning Mistakes Celebrities Made

Also, Read one of our previous Blogs at:

Celebrity Estates: Battle Over Inheritances

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Roth IRA Conversion

What COVID-19 Does to Roth Conversions

What COVID-19 Does to Roth Conversions

With a combination of lowered 2020 tax liability, the potential for future tax increases and potentially lower portfolio values, we are in uncharted financial waters. However, all of these factors may make a Roth conversion more attractive than ever, according to the article “Covid-19 and the CARES Act enhance the Roth conversion game” from the Jacksonville Business Journal.

A quick look first at essentials of the traditional and Roth IRAs:

Tradition IRA contributions are tax deductible.

  • Growth inside the account is tax-deferred,
  • Qualified distributions are taxed as ordinary income, and
  • Required minimum distributions must begin at age 72.

Roth IRA contributions are not tax deductible.

  • Growth inside the account is tax free,
  • Qualified distributions are tax free, and
  • There are no required minimum distributions.

Roth IRAs are an essential part of both estate and retirement planning. Converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA lets you decide when you or your beneficiaries pay taxes. Convert all of your IRA to a Roth, and pay the taxes up front, based on the year the conversion is made. If you have a low-income year, and the value of your IRAs is low, that’s the time to do the conversion.

Just be mindful that making this move for a large amount of money could potentially move you into a higher tax bracket. Being strategic and moving a portion of your IRA could make more sense, especially if you expect that you’ll be in a higher tax bracket during retirement, or if you anticipate that your ultimate beneficiary may be in a higher tax bracket within ten years following their inheritance. (As a result of the SECURE Act, inherited IRA accounts must be emptied within ten years after they are received.)

You’ll also need a plan to pay the taxes on that conversion. In a perfect world, those taxes would be paid from funds outside of your retirement accounts. If the only way to pay this tax is by using funds from your IRA, you can have the funds withheld during the conversion. Be sure to run the numbers before doing the conversion. If you pull money from your IRA account to do the conversion, there will be less money to grow long-term for you, and it will be included in your taxable income for the year.

We all like something for nothing, but there are costs to Roth conversions. The five-year rule requires that a Roth needs to exist for five years, before you can take out money tax free. You’ll need to be sure that you have enough cash on hand to live on for five years after the conversion. However, that’s not all. There are a number of different variations on the five-year rule, depending on your situation. If you are under age 59½ and take a distribution of profits before the five years, you will get hit with a 10% penalty without an allowable exception on the amount you converted. An experienced estate planning attorney will be able to help you make a strategically sound decision.

Reference: Jacksonville Business Journal (July 13, 2020) “Covid-19 and the CARES Act enhance the Roth conversion game”

Rad more related articles at:

Opinion: COVID-19 crisis creates a perfect opportunity for Roth IRA conversions

Roth IRA Conversions Rise Amid Pandemic

Also read one of our previous Blogs at :

Are You Making the Most of the SECURE and CARES Acts?

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funding a trust

Why Is Trust Funding Important in Estate Planning?

Why Is Trust Funding Important in Estate Planning?

Trust funding is a crucial part of estate planning that many people forget to do. If done properly with the help of an experienced estate planning attorney, trust funding will avoid probate, provide for you in the event of your incapacity and save on estate taxes, says Forbes’ recent article entitled “Don’t Overlook Your Trust Funding.”

If you have a revocable trust, you have control over the trust and can modify it during your lifetime. You can also fund the trust while you’re alive. This will save your family time and aggravation after your death.

You can also protect yourself and your family, if you become incapacitated. Your revocable trust likely provides for you and your family during your lifetime. You are able to manage your assets yourself, while you are alive and in good health. However, who will manage the assets in your place, if your health declines or if you are incapacitated?

If you go ahead and fund the trust now, your successor trustee will be able to manage the assets for you and your family if you’re not able. However, if a successor trustee doesn’t have access to the assets to manage on your behalf, a conservator may need to be appointed by the court to oversee your assets, which can be expensive and time consuming.

If you’re married, you may have created a trust that has terms for estate tax savings. These provisions will often defer estate taxes until the death of the second spouse, by providing income to the surviving spouse and access to principal during her lifetime. The ultimate beneficiaries are your children.

You’ll need to fund your trust to make certain that these estate tax provisions work properly.

Any asset transfer will need to be consistent with your estate plan. Ask an experienced estate planning attorney about transferring taxable brokerage accounts, bank accounts and real estate to the trust.

You may also want to think about transferring tangible items to the trust and a closely held business interests, like stock in a family business or an interest in a limited liability company (LLC).

Reference: Forbes (July 13, 2020) “Don’t Overlook Your Trust Funding”

Read more related articles at:

Understanding Funding Your Living Trust

What Is Funding a Trust?

Also read one of our previous Blogs at :

10 Reasons Why You Need A Trust

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