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Programs That Can Pay for Some Caregiver Services
Caregiver with senior woman

Programs That Can Pay for Some Caregiver Services

If you have a loved one who needs caregiver services, you might be looking for ways to help the person pay for the care. Your state might offer assistance with more caregiver services, or might not cover some of the items in this article, but here is a general overview of government programs that can pay for some caregiver services.

Short-Term Caregiver Services and Medicare

If your loved one is eligible for Medicare, he might get a limited amount of short- term care through Medicare. The requirements for these services include:

  • He is recuperating from an injury or illness.
  • His doctor expects him to return to his previous level of health.
  • He meets the Medicare eligibility criteria.
  • His doctor created a plan of care for him.
  • The services are reasonable and necessary to treat his illness or injury.
  • He only needs the services on a temporary basis.

If your loved one does not need medical treatment or needs services 24 hours a day, Medicare will not provide an aide. Medicare does not give assistance for personal services only. Help with preparing meals, dressing, bathing and similar items are personal care and not covered under Medicare in the absence of necessary medical treatment.

Long-Term Care to Stay Out of the Nursing Home

The government realized it can be far less expensive to provide services that allow a person to continue living at home, rather than pay for residence in a nursing home. When a person lives at home, she pays for her housing, utilities, insurance, food and other expenses.

One such plan is the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). If your loved one is a Medicare or Medicaid enrollee, he can get nursing-home level care in his own home. The recipient does not have to pay a deductible or copayment for the services, medical treatment, or even prescription drugs. PACE can provide skilled nursing, hospice and an in-home caregiver. It is whatever his PACE health care team decides he needs.

The PACE requirements include:

  • Enrollment in Medicaid or Medicare
  • Being 55 years or older
  • Meeting his state’s certification rules for needing nursing home-level care
  • With PACE services, he can live safely in the community.
  • He lives in an area that PACE serves. Some states do not participate in the PACE program.

If your loved one is not on Medicare or your state does not offer the PACE program, he might qualify for Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS), also called the waiver program. This program can help your loved one get a high level of care at home, so she does not have to move into a nursing home or another institutional facility.

The requirements for and services of the Medicaid waiver program vary from state to state. In general, she needs to:

  • Be enrolled in Medicaid.
  • Meet her state’s criteria for level-of-care and functional eligibility.
  • Have a plan of care from her doctor.
  • Meet the income and asset restrictions for her state.

Once she qualifies, depending on the circumstances, she can get a home health aide, skilled nursing, hospice, adult day services and personal care. Some states offer meal programs, transportation to medical care, case management and help with shopping, bill paying and other services.

Learn how government benefits can pay for long-term care.

References:

AARP. “Need Help Paying for Your Loved One’s Caregiver?” (accessed June 12, 2019) https://www.aarp.org/caregiving/home-care/info-2018/help-paying-for-caregiver.html?intcmp=AE-CAR-LEG-EOA2

Think of Estate Planning as Stewardship for the Future
Good Estate Planning Involves Stewardship

Think of Estate Planning as Stewardship for the Future

Despite our love of planning, the one thing we often do not plan for, is the one thing that we can be certain of. Our own passing is not something pleasant, but it is definite. Estate planning is seen as an unpleasant or even dreaded task, says The Message in the article “Estate planning is stewardship.” However, think of estate planning as a message to the future and stewardship of your life’s work.

Some people think that if they make plans for their estate, their lives will end. They acknowledge that this doesn’t make sense, but still they feel that way. Others take a more cavalier approach and say that “someone else will have to deal with that mess when I’m gone.”

However, we should plan for the future, if only to ensure that our children and grandchildren, if we have them, or friends and loved ones, have an easier time of it when we pass away.

A thought-out estate plan is a gift to those we love.

Start by considering the people who are most important to you. This should include anyone in your care during your lifetime, and for whom you wish to provide care after your death. That may be your children, spouse, grandchildren, parents, nieces and nephews, as well as those you wish to take care of with either a monetary gift or a personal item that has meaning for you.

This is also the time to consider whether you’d like to leave some of your assets to a house of worship or other charity that has meaning to you. It might be an animal shelter, community center, or any place that you have a connection to. Charitable giving can also be a part of your legacy.

Your assets need to be listed in a careful inventory. It is important to include bank and investment accounts, your home, a second home or any rental property, cars, boats, jewelry, firearms and anything of significance. You may want to speak with your heirs to learn whether there are any of your personal possessions that have great meaning to them and figure out to whom you want to leave these items. Some of these items have more sentimental than market value, but they are equally important to address in an estate plan.

There are other assets to address: life insurance policies, annuities, IRAs and other retirement plans, along with pension accounts. Note that these assets likely have a beneficiary designation and they are not distributed by your will. Whoever the beneficiary is listed on these documents will receive these assets upon your death, regardless of what your will says.

If you have not reviewed these beneficiary designations in more than three years, it would be wise to review them. The IRA that you opened at your first job some thirty years ago may have designated someone you may not even know now! Once you pass, there will be no way to change any of these beneficiaries.

Work with an experienced estate planning attorney to create your last will and testament. For most people, a simple will can be used to transfer assets to heirs.

Many people express concern about the cost of estate planning. Remember that there are important and long-lasting decisions included in your estate plan, so it is worth the time, energy and money to make sure these plans are created properly.

Compare the cost of an estate plan to the cost of buying tires for a car. Tires are a cost of owning a car, but it’s better to get a good set of tires and pay the price up front, than it is to buy an inexpensive set and find out they don’t hold the road in a bad situation. It’s a good analogy for estate planning.

Learn how a trust can prevent a child from getting too much too fast.

Reference: The Message (June 14, 2019) “Estate planning is stewardship.”